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Full text of "Voyage in search of La Pérouse : performed by order of the Constituent Assembly, during the years 1791, 1792, 1793, and 1794"

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Darlington Memorial Library 

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Y A G E 

IN SEARCH OF , Q 



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LA PEROUSE 

PERFORMED »Y ORDER OF 

. THE CONSTITUENT ASSEMBLY, 

DURING THE 

yp:ars 1791, 1792, 1793, AND 1794, 

AND DRAWN U? 

BY M. LABILLARDIERE, 

rORRESPONDENT OF THE ACADEMY OF SCIENCES hi 

PARIS, MEMBER. OF THE SOCIETY OF NATURAL 

His TORY, AND ONE OF THE NATURALIST:. 

ATTACHED TO THE, EXPEDITION. 

TRANS L AT ED FR OM THE FR EPlCH. 



ILLUSTRATED WITH FORTY-SIX PLATLci. 



IN T\VO VOLUMES, 

VOL. If. 



Sm»li>-}z'»<S=M» 



PRINTED FOi. JOHN. STOCKDALE, PIOCADILL'ir; 
1800- 



CONTENTS 



OF 



THE SECOND VOLUME. 



CHAP. X. 

Stay m RocJ:y Bay — Various Excurfions into the Coun- 
try — Goodnefs of the Soil — SmguJar Orgamzatiort of 
the Bark.offeveral Trees peculiar to New Holland- — 
Difficulty of penetrafwg into the Woods — The Trees 
wiihiji land are not hollowed by Fire like thofe near the 
Sea — Pit Coal to the North IV eft of South Cape — In- 
' Terviem with' the Savages — Their CondiiB towards 
ns very peaceahle-^One of them came to take a View 
of us at Night while we voere af.eep — Several of them 
accompany us through the Woods — Various other In- 
terviews with the Inhabitants — -They broil Shell FiJJi, 
to eat them — Polygamy efiablijlied amon^ thefe People 
Their Manner of f filing — The Women fearch for Shell 
Fifh, fometimes by diving to a great Depth — One of 
the Savages vifiis us 071 lioard — Their Knowledge of 
Botany ■ - ' - p3ge 9 

CHAP. XI. 

Departure from Rocky Bay to pafs. through Dentre- 
cajleuux Strait — The Ships run aground in this -Strait 

. —-^y arious 




COXTENtS. 

- — Vitrious Excnrfio-nshito the ne'ighhouring Country-^ 
Interview iv'iih the ISIathes — They had Jefi their 
fVeapons in the Woods, a7id reftimed them on their 
Reiurn-^We anvhor in Adventure Bay page ^B 

CHAP. XII. 

departure from Adventure Bay — TS^e pafs clofe by the 
North End of New Zeala?id — Interview with the 
Itdjuhitants—Dlfcovery of fever ai Ifuinds hitherto un- 
hmwri-^Anchor at Tojigatahoo^ one of the Friendly 
Iflandi — iLagernefs of the Natives to come on hoard 
and furnijh us with frejh Provi/wn — We: fait a great 
Number of Hogs — The IJlanders greatly addicted to 
Theft — One of our Sentinels knocked down in the Night 
by a Native, who flole his Mujket — The AJfaJfin de- 
livered to General Dentrecajieaux by King Toobou, 
who refiores the Mujket that had beenjiolen — Queen 
Tine comes on board — Toobou gives a Feaji to the 
Getieral — Queen Tine alfo does the fame — The Smith 
of the Reclierche is knocked dowri with Clubs by the 
Natives, who afterwards Jirlp him, in open Day, ifi 
Sight of our Fejfels — Some y dung Bread-Fruit Trees 
are taken on board to enrich our Colonies with this va* 
habk Frodu5tlo7i - - page 85 

CHAP. xni. 

Departure from Tongataboo — IVe get Sight of the 
Southern Part of the^ Archipelago of the Tierra del 
Ffpiritu Santo, (Neiv Hebrides) — Dlfcovery of the 
IJland of Beaupri — We A^ichor at New Caledonia 

— Intervkws 



CONTENTS. 7 

..^Tfiterviews with tli& Natives — Defcription of their 
JJnis-r—Thefe Savages are Canriihah-^Their hipu- 
dence toward us — They eat great Piec$s of Steatite^ 
to appeafe their Hunger — Their Attempts to/eize upon 
our Boats — Different Excurfions into the interior 
Part of the JJlarJ — De.ifh of Captain Huon — Neiv 
Species of Spider, on which the Savages of New 
Caledonia feed - - page iS6 

CHAP. XIV. 

JOeparture from New Caledonia — Interview with the 
Inhahitants of the IJIand'of St. Croix — Their Trea^ 
chery — One of thefe Savages Jlightly pierces with an 
Arrow the Forehead of one of our Seamen, who died 

fome Time after in Confequence of the Wound — Singu- 
lar ConjiruBion of their Canoes- — View of the Southern 
Fart of the Archipelago of Solomon — Interview 
with its Inhahitants — Their Perfidy — The Northern 
Coafl of Louifiade reconnoitred — Interviezv with its 

Inhahitants — Dangers of that Navigation Sail 

through Dampiers Straits in order to reconnoitre the 
North Coaji of New Britain — Death of General 

■ Dentrecajleaux — The Scurvy mahes great Ravages in 
hoth Ships — Death of the Baker of the Recherche — 
Cafl anchor at Waygiou - - P^ge 258 

C H A P. XV. 

Abode at Waygiou — Scorhutic Patients are fpeedily re- 
lieved — Interviews with the Nalives — Anclior at 
Bourou — Paffage through the Straits ef Bouton-^ 

Ravages 



8 CONTENTl^. 

■■ Rava^eyproduccciT>y the Dyfenfery—Anclicr at Sou^ 

^'- rahii^o^^Ahodc at Samaran^—My DefenUonat Fort 

''j4ny,\'nYiir Batavia-^'Ahod^'at JJli de^ FruTK'e-^ 

Return to France -^ . ' " pisige 298 



"••^E**" 



APPEN-DIX. 

Vocabulary of the Malay Language - \ 
Language of the Savages of Die^ 

mens Lam} - - - 43 
' — . . ■■ iMuguage of the Natlvei -of Kezv 

Caledonhf r. - <r " \5S 

' — '■ "'^'> ' ' v ' Langrtageof the Naiii^^s of JVuy- 

S'i'^^' - - - ~ "^V,'..^.68 

*TAiij.E& x>f the Rout of the Ff^erance - ' 73 



VOYAGE 



VOYAGE 

> IN SEARCH OF 

LA PEROUSE. 



CHAP. X. 

^tay hi Rocky Bay — Various Excnrjtons into the 
Country — Goodnefs of theSo'il — Singular Orga- 
mzation of tJie Bark of federal Trees peculiar to 
New Holland — Difficulty of p^}ietrati7tg into the 
Woods — "The Trees within Land are not hollowed 
by Fire, like tho/e near the Sea — Pit Ccal to the 
North-lFefl of South Cape — Interview with the 
Savages — Their ConduSl towards us very peace- 
able — One of them came to take a View of us at 
Night J while we were qfleep — Several of them ac- . 
company us through the Woods — Various other 
- hiterviews with the hihabitants — They broil 
Shell Fijh, to eat them — Folygamy eflahliflied 
among thefe People — Their Manner of fjhing-^ 
The Women fearchfor Shell Fifli, fomctimes by 
diving to a great Depthy^One of the Savages 
viftts us on Board — Their Knowledge of Botany. 

24th January, 17Q3. 

A T five o'clock in the morning I landed near 

the entrance of our anchoring-place. Along 

the fhore I obferved blocks of fand-llone, the de- 

VoL.II. B compofition 



10 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [ijQS, 

compofition of which had furnifhed the very fine 
quartzofe fand, on which I walked for fome time. 
The Elperance had ahcady found a waterins:- 
placc, in a Httle cove to the north- weft, where 
there was very good water, eafily procured. The 
brook that furnifhed it fell into the fea from a 
height of more than three feet, fo that it would 
readily run into the long-boat through wooden 
troughs. 

We foon reached the head of the bay, where 
we found a hut, which the favages had conftru6l- 
ed with much art. The ingenuity with which 
they had dilpofed the bark that covered ' its roof, 
excited our admiration ; the heavieft rain could 
not penetrate it. It had an opening in the fide 
towards the fea, and curiofity induced us to enter. 
Some of the people on board the Efperance^had 
told us, that the evening before they had feen 
three natives, fitting round a fmall fire, clofe to 
the hut, who, being frightened by the found of 
a gun difcharged at a bird, had fled with precipi- 
tation. We had ibon another proof of their pre- 
fetice at this extremity of the bay ; and it appeared 
to us, that they came regularly to fieep in this 
hut. In a very fliort time we repented our en- 
tering into it ; for the vermin that ftuck to our 
clothes, bit us in a very difagrecable manner. 
The tide of flood had raifed the fea to a height 

that 



Jan.] of la perouse. 11 

that enabled it to flow within the land, where 
we faw on it many ducks ; but they would not 
let us approach within a confiderable diftance of 
them. From their being thus afraid of man, I 
infer^ that they are not fafe from the attacks of 
the natives. 

In the woods we found few infects ; but for 
this we were amply compenfated when we re- 
turned to the fea-fide. As the weather was very 
fine, the infers had flown thither from all parts ; 
and among the great number of thofe that had 
attempted to crofs the bay, many termites, and 
various coleoptera, of very ilrange fhapes. The 
w^ind had driven them upon the fand, where we 
could colle6l them w'ith great eafe. 

Next morning, at day-break, we landed near 
the head of the bay, whence we entered a large 
valley, which ftretchcs to the fouth-weft, between 
fome very high hills. From the top of one of the 
higheft we could fee all the country, as far as the 
foot of the great mountain, that bore north-well 
from our fliips. .The fnow^ ftill remaining on its 
fummit, rendered the view very pi<5lurefque, and 
by its contraft heightened the beautiful verdure 
of the large trees, which appeared to grow on it 
with great vigour. 

Many fpecies of emhotJirium werfc obferved on 
the declivity of the hills w^here we were. Lower 

B 2 down 



12 VOYAGE IN SEARCIt [l/O^. 

down we perceived fprings of clear water, creep- 
ing out at feyeral places, and running into a lakc> 
■where I fa,w fbme pelicans ;. but \mfortunateIy I j 
was able to fire at thon only from a great dif- 
%ap.ce. This lake is in the midil of a large plain, 
the foil of which, in the lowefl parts, eonfiils of 
clay thoroughly drenched vsith water, and covered 
with roots of different plants, which form a bad 
kind of turf on a fnakins; bottom. Throu2:h this 
are openings in fcveral places a few feet broad^ 
difplaying a very thin mud, covered with water. 
Near thefe bogs, I had the. pleafure of colle(5ling 
a great number of plants,''among wdiieh I remark- 
ed feveral n€w fpecies of caheolqiia and drofera, 
(fun- dew.) - 

Continuing our walk, we foon had a vegetable 
mould under our i^tt^ which I found the fame 
at more than half a yard deep throughout the 
whole breadth, of the valley. The temperature 
of the ciima,ts would be extremply favourable ta 
the, cultivation of moft of the ve<retables of Eu- 
rope ; and a few trenches, dug in proper places, 
would give a fufHcicnt difcharge to the water, 
to drain almoft all the marflies found there, and 
convert them into fertile foil. 

As night approached, we had, reached the fpot 
where we landed, and faw there feveral heaps ol 
0} fi:cr-f]iells-, brought by the nati^■es, -which had 

induced 



Jan.] of la perouse. 13 

induced ourfifhersto fearch for. them in the bay- 
At low water they difcovercd, very near this 
place, an oyftcr-bank, from v, hich they took a 
large quantity ; and the flood brought in with 
it fevcral fpccics of ray, foine of which they 
caught aifo. 

The whole of the 2l)th I fpcnt in defcribing 
and preparing every thing I had CGlle(5led fince 
our arrival in Rocky Bay. I was aftoniflied at 
the great variety of produ<5iions ftill afforded me 
by this part of New Holland, where I had been 
very diligent in my refearches for more than a 
month the preceding year ; though, it is true, fe- 
veral leagues from the places we had now^ vifited, 
and in a more advanced feafon, w^hen a great 
number of plants, that I now found, muft have 
difappearcd. 

On the following morning, as foon as it began 
to dawn, wefctoff, with the dehgn of rerhaining 
on fhore a couple of days, refohing to purfje our 
refearches to a confiderablc diflance fiom our 
place of anchorage. We landed in the fouth- 
weft, and iollowed a path, traced nearly in that 
dire(5:iion by the natives, where we obicrved to- 
lerably recent marks of naked feet, among which 
were fome of very young children. No doubt 
ibrrie families, alarmed by our ilay in Kocky Bay, 

B 3 . ^ had 



14 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l793. 

had gone in queft of another retreat, where they 
deemed themfelves in more fafety. 

After an hour's walk, we refted in a low place, 
where the waters from the neighbouring hills 
were colle<51:ed. To feveral fpecies of Jeptofper- 
mmn this moifture was {o well fuited, that they 
had grow^n up to very large trees ; though all 
that I had hitherto found in other places were but 
little flirubs. Some here were more than thirty 
yards high, though the trunk was not eight inches 
in diameter. One fpecies was remarkable for its 
bark, which was about an inch thick, and com- 
pofcd of a great number of flakes, lying one over 
another, very eafily feparable, and as thin as the 
fineft Chinefe paper. This fingular organization 
of the bark occurs only in New Holland : it 
is nearly the fame in the eucalypius refin'ijera ; 
and I had obferved it alfo on the fouth-wefl 
coaft of this country, on two large trees, one be- 
longing to the family o^ protca, the other to the 
myrtles. 

We foon found a current of air oppofite to the 
ftrons!; breezes from the fouth-weft. Near we 
ja^."/ tQe marks of a fire, which appeared to have 
been iatciy burning. The natives had left there 
part of a italk oi funis palmatus (the palmated or 
fwxet fucus,) which the natives eat, after they 

have 



Jan.] of la perouse. 15 

have broiled it, as we had afterwards an opportu- 
nity of feeing,* 

The Ibuth-weft wind, which had been pre- 
ceded by a great defcent of the quickfilver in the 
barometer, blew in the afternoon in violent gufls, 
which brought on rain juft as we reached the fea- 
Ihore near South Cape. Fortunately a Ihrub of 
the rutaceous family afforded us an excellent 
flicker by its bufliy thicknefs. This flirub grows 
vigoroufly on theie heights, notwithftanding its 
being expofed to all the impetuofity of the vio- 
lent winds that prevail on thefe coafls. 

To this new genus I have given the name of 
mazeutoxeron. 

The calyx is bell-fhaped, and four-toothed. 

The petals are attached to the bottom of the 
calyx. 

The ftamens, eight in number, are fixed to the 
receptacle. 

The germen is oval. The flyle is not quite 
fo long as the flamcns. The ftigma has four di- 
visions, 

* This fpecies of fea- wrack, we are informed, is eaten 
both in Scotland and Ireland, fometimes frefli, as a fallad ; 
but more frequently it is dried, rolled together, and chewed 
as tobacco. Jn the lile of Sky it is ufed as a medicine. — 
Tranjlator. 

B 4 The 



1^ VOTAGR IN SEARCH [t703. 

The capfule has four cells, each of which is 
formed of two valves ; and is covered with hairs. 

Each cell contains twTo or three feeds, nearly 
fpherical. 

The leaves are oppofite, rounded, covered 
with thick down, and of a fallow colour under- 
neath. 

The flowers are foiitary% and placed at the in- 
fertions of the leaves. 

To this fhrub I give the name of mazeuioxcron 
rufum. 

Explanation of the Figures, Plate XVIL 

Fig. 1 . A branch. 

¥'ig. 2. The flower. 

Yig. 3. The petal. 

Fig. 4. The petals removed to fiiow the ila- 
mens. 

F'lg. 5. The flamens magnified. 

Fig. 6. The capfule. 

We walked fome way to the north acrofs hil- 
locks of farid, before we got down to the beach, 
the windings of which we follov/cd with great 
eafe for a confiderable diftance ; but at length 
we were flopped by a mountain, which termi- 
nated in a cliff"; where it advanced into the fea. 
We attempted to go round it on the land fide, 

but 




Ct<x 






Jan.] of la perouse. 17 

but found it impoffible to penetrate through the 
thickets, by which it was environed. 

Night coming on, we returned in fearch of a 
convenient place to pafs the night near a rivulet, • 
which we had crolTed. A thick bufh was the 
befl Ihclter we could find ; and this we increafcd 
by the addition of branches from others, fo that 
wx expelled to have been perfectly fecure againft 
any inconvenience from the wind. But the gale 
from^ the fouth-weft blew fo ftrong during the 
night, that the rain penetrated our covering on 
all iides ; and to heighten our diftrefs, the cold 
was very piercing, which drove moft of us near 
the fire, though there we were ftiil more expofed 
to the wet, than in our fort of hut. 

28th. As foon as day broke, we quitted our un- 
comfortable lodging, and crciTed the downs, that 
furrounded us. In fome places, where the fand 
appeared lately to have fallen down, I obferved, 
that thefe fand hills appeared to reft partly on a 
very hard fteatite, of a dark grey colour, partly 
on fandftone. Prefently after I obferved from 
the borders of the fhore a very large rock, ftand- 
ing in the fea, and not far from the land, which 
exhibited on all fides the fame fpecies of fteatitc. 
This rock, which is very high, is pierced at one 
of its extremities. 

The waves had feparated from the bottom of 

the 



IS VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l/QS. 

the fea much fponge of the fpecies called fpongia 
cancellatay^zzX. quantities of which we faw thrown 
upon the fhore. 

In the midft of thefe downs grew a new fpe- 
cies of plantain, which I call plantago Irkufpidata, 
from the form of its leaves. This muft be reckon- 
ed among the moft ufcful plants, which this coun- 
try affords for the food of man. The hope of 
finding fome vegetables fit to eat as fallad had 
induced the moft provident among us, to bring 
the necefifary fauce, and the fallad furnifhed by 
the leaves of this plant, which were very tender, 
was highly relifhed by all the company. 

Several kinds of grafs, among which I noticed 
many new fpecies of fefcue (fejiucaj, ferved to 
bind the fand together. A new geranium, with 
an herbaceous ftalk, very fmall, and with leaves 
deeply cut, was among the number of plants 1 
colleded. It w^as the firfi: plant of the genus, 
that I found in this country. 

I had obferved feveral burrows made in the 
ground, where the land had fufficient folidity, 
but I knew not by what animal they were form- 
ed ; when a kangarou of a middle fize ftarted up 
at our approach, and ran into one of them. We 
fired in feveral times, hoping the fmoke would 
drive him out, but he would not quit his hole. 

Several tracks of kangarous through a little 

wood 



Jan.] of la perouse. 19 

wood roufed the ardour of two of our fhootcrs, 
who were with us ; and they foon got iight of fe- 
veral of thefc animals in the midft of a meadow 
watered by a delightful rivulet, but all of them 
nvere too iliy to be approached. 

At length we got on board, greatly fatigued 
for want of fleep, as we had not clofed our cyts 
for more than forty hours. 

2yth. The four fubfequent days I employed in 
-yifiting the environs of the place where w^e lay at 
anchor. Toward the fouth-fouth-eafl I found a 
fine tree, which appeared to me to belong to the 
family of conifera, judging by the difpofition of 
its ftamens, and the refmous fmell of every part : 
but I was never able to procure any of its fruit, 
though I afterwards faw feveral trees of the 
fame kind. No doubt the feafon was not yet far 
enough advanced ; and the ftamens, which I ob- 
ierved, appeared to have remained ever iince the 
preceding year. I mention this tree, not only on 
account of the fmgularity of its leaves for a tree 
of this family, for they are broad, and deeply in- 
dented on their edges, but for their utility in 
, making beer. They afforded a bitter and aroma- 
tic extrad, which I imagined might be ufed as 
that of fpruce ; and on making a trial of it with 
malt, 1 found that I was not miftaken. 

This fine tree is often a yard in thicknefs, and 

^twenty 



20 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [1793. 

twenty-five or thirty yards high. Its wood is 
very hard, of a reddifh colour, and fufccptible of 
a fine polifli. 

The thick woods we had to the north-north- 
w^eft of our fhips furnifhed a great number of 
trees of a moderate height, which grew extremely 
well; notwithftanding the fliade of the vaft eu- 
calyptus ghhulus. 

I fnall give fome account of a new genus of 
the family of the hypericums, which conftituted 
the ornament of thefe folitary places, and which 
I call carpodontos. 

The calyx has four fcarious leaves, united at 
the upper part : they fall off as the corolla unfolds 
itfelf. 

The corolla is formed of four petals, attached 
beneath the germen. 

The ftamens are numerous, (thirty or forty.) 

The germen is elongated, and furmounted with 
fix or feven ftyles, each of which has an acute 
jftigma. 

The capfule opens into fix or feven valves, 
woody, cleft internally throughout their \a hole 
length, and bidentatcd at their fuperior extre- 
inity. 

The feeds are few, and flattened. 

This tree, which does not reach a height of 
more than eight or ten yards, is but flender. 

Its 







nwrrt, Joujtj. 



"?^ti 



Tui ^fyJ.Slvdtdale, JPUtadOfy. U '*jfy>rU./Me . 



FjELBi] OF LA PEROUSE. 21 

. Its leaves are oval, oppofite, coriaceous, fliin- 
ing, and covered with a thin film of refm, which 
tranfudes frOm the upper part : the under part 
is whitifli, and the lateral ribs are fcareely per- 
ceptible on it. 

I have given it the name of carpodontos luc'tda. 

Explanation of the figures, Plate XVIII. 

Fig. 1. Branch of the carpodontos lucida. 

Fig. 2. Flower with the calyx already feparated 
at its bafe. 

Fig. 3. Flower viewed in front. 

Fig. 4. Pofterior part of the flower, where the 
calyx may be obferved, v/hich fometimes remains 
attached to it by one of its fcales, after the co- 
rolla is unfolded. 

Fig. 5. The petal. 

FiZ'3' The ilaraens mao-ni£ed. 

Fig. 7 . The germen. 

Fig. 8. The capfule. 

Febrcjary 2.d. We had planned a vifit to the 
higliell of the mountains in this part of New 
Holland, the various fites of which gave us hopes 
of a great number of new productions* Each of 
us took provifion for five days, which we pre- 
fumed would afford us fufficient time for our pur- 
pofe. Accordingly we fet off very early in the 
morning, with a tolerable ffockof bifcuit, cheefe, 

bacon. 



2?2 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [j f ^3* 

bacon, and brandy, our ufual ftore on diftant ex- 
curfions. 

When we had proceeded about halfway on 
the road we had before taken, in our journey to 
South Cape, we found an extenfive opening 
through the woods, which faclUtated our progrefs 
weilerly, as far as the foot of the hills, that we 
were obliged to crofs ; and then we plunged into 
the midft of the woods, with no other guide but 
the compafs. 

We directed our way to the north, advancing 
flowly from the obftacles prefented us at every 
ftep by vaft trees lying one upon another. Moft 
of thefe, blown down by the violence of the 
winds, had torn up in their fall part of the foil 
that bore them ; others, that had fallen in confe-. 
quence of their age, were every where rotten, and 
the lower part of their trunks was frequently {ecu 
Handing amidft the wreck of their upper parts, 
that lay in huge heaps around. 

After a very laborious walk, we at length reach- 
ed the fummit of a mountain, whence we per- 
ceived to the fouth the middle of the roadftead 
of South Cape, and to the north-weft the large 
mountain, toward which we dire(5led our fteps. 

Night foon obliging us to halt, we kindled a 
large fire, round which we repofed ; and a com- 
fortable flecp difTipated the fatigues of the day. 

We 



Feb.}' of la perouse. 2S 

We ilept in the open air, for we f(^ouId have 
found it difficult, to conftrud a Ihelter in a fhort 
time among the large trees, as their branches were 
moftly near the fummit, and this part of the 
foreft was deftitute of Ihrubs. We looked in vain 
for fome large trunks hollowed by fire ; thefe arc 
to be found only in places frequented by the 
natives. We had feen a great number on ths 
borders of the fea, where we had obferved many 
paths, which the natives had cleared ; but no- 
thing .gave us any intimation that they had ever 
come into the midft of thefe thick forefts. 

The air was extremely calm ; and about mid- 
night I awaked, when, folitary in the midft of 
thefe filent woods, the majefty of which was half 
difclofed to me by the feeble gleam of the ftars, 
I felt myfelf penetrated with a fentiment of ad- 
mration of the grandeur of nature, which it is be- 
yond my power to exprefs. 

3d. At day-break we refumed our journey in 
the fame direction as before. Our difficulties in- 
creafed more and more. The trunks of trees lying 
one upon another often prefented an almoft impe- 
netrable barrier, obliging us - to climb to the up- 
permoft, and then to walk from tree to tree, at 
the hazard of a fall from a confidcrable height ; 
lor feveral were covered with a fpongy bark, fo 
wet with the damp continually prevailing in theie 

thick 



24 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [1/93. 

thick woods, that our path was extremely flip- 
pery, as weJl as difficult. 

The day was confiderably advanced, when wc 
arrived at the fummit of ^ mountain, from which 
we perceived the whole extent of a long valley, 
which we had ftill to crofs, before we could reach 
the foot of the mountains, which we had fet out 
to viiit. The intermediate fpace appeared to be 
about eighteen miles ; and this fpace was occupied 
by forefts, as thick as thofe through which we 
had juft penetrated. It was to be apprehended, 
that it would take us upwards of two days, to 
reach the end of our intended journey ; even if 
wx were not retarded by extcniive marflies, or 
other obftacles, which we could not poffibly fore- 
fee. It would require nearly as long a time to 
return ; and from this calculation, our provifion 
would be expended three days before the termi- 
nation of our journey. Thefe forefts in the mean 
time afforded nothing that could contribute to 
our fubfiflence; and confequently we were obliged 
to relinquifh our defign. . 

The great chain of mountains appeared to 
ftretch from the north-eafl to the fouth-wefi:, 
through a vaft extent of countr^^ 

In the forefts we had juft traverfcd, wc found 
the fame kind of ftones which we had already 
met with towards South Cape. Seeing this Cape 

fouth 



Feb.] ' OF LA PEROUSE. ^5 

fouth by eaft, we took this diredlion, and went 
to fpend the night on the llcirts of the foreft, 
near a rivulet, which runs to the foot of the 
mountains. 

4th. The difficulty of penetrating through the 
woods, made us refolve in future to follow the 
Ihore as far as we could, and avail ourfelves of 
the openings that terminated on it, to proceed 
into the interior part of the country. In this 
nlanner we could traverfe a considerable extent of 
ground in little time ; but it was neceffary for us 
firft to pafs the cliff that projed:ed into the fea, 
and had ftopped us a^few days before. By frelh 
attempts at length we fucceeded, and, after fiir- 
mounting the greateft difficulties, we penetrated 
through the thick woods that oppofed our paf- 
fage. On quitting thefe we were able to con- 
tinue our journey along the fea-fide, the way be- 
ing fufficiently ealy, as the mountain terminated 
at the fhore by a gentle ilopc : but we were foon 
obliged to climb over fteep rocks, at the foot of 
which the fca broke in a tremendous manner. 
This road, notwithflanding its difficulty, was fre- 
quented by the natives, for we found in it one cf 
their fpears. This weapon was no more than a 
very ftraight long ftick, which they had not taken 
the pains to fmooth, but which was pointed at 
each end. 

Vol. IL C The 



26 VOYAGE IN SEAUCH 1^79^' 

The fide of the mountains being expofcd for a 
confiderablc extent, we obferved a horizontal vein 
of coal, the greateft thicknefs'of which did not 
exceed four inches. Wc noticed it for the fpacc 
of more than three hundred yards. The flratum 
beneath it was fand ftone ; that above, a dark 
brown fchift. From thefe indications I prcfumc, 
that excellent coal may be found in abundance 
at a greater, depth. It is well known, that the 
richeft mines of this fuel are commonly found, 
beneath fandftone. 

The ruft, with which I perceived the water^ 
that trickled from the rocks, highly coloured, was 
the firil indication thefe mountains afforded me 
of their containing iron ; but it was not long be- 
fore I found fine fragments of hematites of a 
bronze red colour, and farther on an ochry earth 
of a tolerably bright red. Small feparate frag- 
i!nents of tripoli alfo were fcattered about in the 
way we took ; probably feparated from the higher 
ftrata, which we could not diftinguifh, as they 
were covered by the earth that tumbled down in 
laro;e maiTcs. 

Several new fpecies of lohfl/ff grew out from 
the clefts of the rocks, which became more and 
more ftecp. Some of them were perpendicular 
eliffs, more than two hundred yards in height 
above the level of the fea. Very recent marks of 

the 



Feb.] of la perouse. , 27 

the earth having tumbled down made us refolve 
to take our way through the woods, and not to 
approach the cUffs again without the greateft 
caution. 

For fometime we proceeded amid ilirubs, 
nioft of which were of the heath family fericaj, 
or that of diofpyros. 

Our attention was foon called to a fearful found, 
the repetitions of which feemed to obey the mo- 
tions of the waves, and with the greateft aftonifh- 
ment we beheld the terrible fpe(5lacle of the de- 
ftrud.ive effects of the fea, continually undermin- 
ing thefe cliffs. The bafe of an enormous rock 
was already buried in the waves, while its fum- 
mit was hollowed into a vaft arch, fufpended at 
the height of more than two hundred yards, 
which, by reverberating the found, increafed the 
noife of the reiterated dafhings of the impetuous 
waves that broke againft its fides. 

Having paffed the firft two capes to the weft 
of South Cape, we returned tow ards the latter, 
where we fpent a very bad night, for \infortu- 
nately we w^ere at no great diftance from fome 
ftagnant waters, and the extreme calmnefs of the 
air expofed us to all the fury of the mofchettoes. 

5th. Morning being the time of low water, 
we hoped to be enabled, by its means, to procure 
fome Ihell-flih, of which the bad quality of our 

C 2 provision 



2^ tot AGE IN SEARDii [1^7^34 

provifion friade us feel a preffing want : but the; 
breeze fetting in from the fea difappointed us, by 
raifing the water nearly as high as it would have 
been at flood tide. Thus we were obliged to con- 
tent ourfelves with our fait provifion. 

The cafcade at South Cape, from which a- 
great deal of water fell into the fea, when Captain 
Furneaux landed there, was nearly dry at this 
time. From the marks of its bed, however, it 
was eafy to perceive that its run muft be confi-. 
derable in the rainy feafon. 
■ We found a dead feal on the fliore, of the fpe- 
cies called j^/zf?6'^ 7n&nacus. Two fevere contufions 
on its head gave us reafon to fuppofe, that it had 
been driven againfl fome rocks by the violence ot 
the waves, which it had not ftrength to fur^ 
mount. 

Bending our courfe toward our anchoring-place^ 
we found two large pools to the eaft-north-eaft 
of South Cape ; and as we went round them, w^e 
faw on their borders fcveral burrows of kangarous. 
A new fpecics of utrkulana difpla}'ed its beauti- 
ful flowers on the furface of their tranquil waters. 
I was aftoniflied that thefe ftagnant pools did not 
exhale a fetid fmcU, as is ufually the cafe ; but it 
is probable^ that the w^ater is fpeedily reneVv^ed by 
filtering through the ground. 

It was three o'clock in the afternoon when. we. 

arrived 



Feb.] ^ OF LA PERousE. 29 

.arrived on board. One of the afunners of the Ef- 
perance, named Boucher, we learned had died, 
durhig our abfence, of a confumption. 

Gth and 7th. After having defcribedand pre- 
pared the fubjexfls of natural hiftory, which I had 
collected the preceding days, 1 employed the re- 
mainder of my time in vifitins; the low lands to 
the fouth-eaft. The woods here w^ere eafily pe- 
netrated, as the trees ftood at fome diftance from 
each other, Almofl every where I found the foil 
an excellent mould. I cut fpecimens of feveral 
forts of wood, to find out the different ufes for 
which each might be employed. That fine tree, 
which I imagine to be of the coniferous family, 
and which I have already mentioned, gave con- 
fiderable rcfillance to the faw : no doubt it will 
furniih the moft compa^ timber of any of that 
family. 

It had long been my waih, that the greater 
part of the feeds we had brought from Europe, 
capable of fucceeding in this climate, might be 
fown on this part of the coaft in a goo4 mould 
fuf&ciently watered : but on my return I faw with 
regret that a very dry and very fandy fpot, pretty 
near the head of the bay, had been dug up and 
fown. 

Early in the morning of the 8th, the gardener 

and I, with two of the crew, let off for port 

C 3 Dentre- 



30 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l TQS. 

Dentrecafteaux, intending to fpend two days in 
examining its environs. We landed at the mouth 
of the harbour, on its weftern fide ; and fortu- 
nately found ourfelves on a bank of oyfters, of 
which we collected an abundant ftore. 

It was with pleafure wx faw once more a place, 
which we had vifited feveral times the preceding 
year. Moft of the little rivulets we had then met 
with, and even that where we procured our wha- 
ler, were now dry. 

We foon reached the head of the harbour, and 
found, as we proceeded up the river, very clofe 
and marfhy thickets, which often retarded our 
progrefs. 

Snakes are not common at Diemen's Cape, yet 
I faw two, ileeping in the fun, on large trunks of 
trees ; on our approach they withdrew into the 
hollow trunks, that ferved them for a retreat. 
They were of the fpccics I had found the year be- 
fore, which is by no means dangerous. 

Thousfh the courfe of the river was obfi:rud;ed 
by large trees at almoft every ftep, we were 
obliged to go up it near a mile and half, before 
we could find one, by means of which we could 
crofs to the oppofite bank without too great dif- 
iiculty. 

From this place we proceeded north-eaft, tra- 

verliDg 



Feb.] of la perouse. 31 

verfmg very commodioufly a fpacious plain, part 
o{ the vegetables growing on which had lately 
been burned by the natives. In a fhort time we 
reached the head of the great hike, along the bor- 
ders of which we walked as far as the fea, and 
having travelled o\er a confiderable extent of 
ground, we returned to its extremity, to fpend 
the night near a riv ulet, which we had already 
crolTcd. As the weather wa.s very fine, we lay 
down to flecp in the open air, flickered folely by 
large trunks of trees, that lay on the ground ; but 
the piercing cold we felt foon obliged us to kindle 
a large fire. 

It is remarkable, that the temperature of the 
air, at this extremity of New Holland, is fome- 
times 1 7° lower in the night than it was in the 
day. (From 23" to 6° of the mercurial thermo- 
meter graduated according to Reaumur, which 
is always to be undcrflood). In fa6l this narrow 
land, lying in a pretty high latitude, is not very 
capable of long retaining the heat, which has been 
imparted to it by the rays of the fun. This great 
difference of temperature was very inconvenient 
to us, as it obliged us to enciimber ourfelves with 
clothes, which we found very troublefome in the 
day. I mull obferve, however, that the variation 
ot the thermometer on board at the fame time 
did not exceed 5^ or 0°. 

C4 Qth. 



32 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l/O^* 

gth. As foon as day-light appeared, while the 
two men that accompanied us were flill alleep, 
the gardener and I proceeded towards the part of 
the lake oppofite that which we had vifited the 
evening before. 

I had the pleafure of colledling feveral fpecies 
of m'tmoja with fimple leaves, all the parts of 
fru6lification of which were unfolded. I had al- 
ready fome fpecimens, but they were very im- 
perfect. 

After w^aiking at leaft a couple of miles, we 
fancied w-e heard human voices before us. Re- 
doubling our attention, we advanced a few fleps, 
when a ludden cry, arifmg from feveral voices 
-unitedj iflued frorn one fpot, and we perceived 
through the trees a number of the natives, moft 
of whom appeared to be iifhing on the borders of 
the lake. As we were unarmed, and ignorant of 
their intentions, we did not hefitate to return to 
our companions, each of whom had a mufket ; 
and imm.ediately croiled through the wood, that 
the favages might not lee us, left they lliould be 
t;impteG to purfae us, on perceiving our flight. 

When we had told our men the occafion of 
our return, I exprelTed my fcrong defire to have 
an interview with thefe people. It was neceilary 
firft, however, to prepare our means of defence, 
fo that we might be able to avail ourfeives of 

theni 



Feb.] of la perouse. 33 

them in cafe of an aflault. Accordingly we got 
ready a few cartridges, as faft as we could, and 
fet out towards the place, where we had feen the 
natives. It was now only nine o'clock. We had 
gone only a few fteps before we met them. 
The men and youths were ranged in front, nearly 
in a femi-circle : the women, children, and girls, 
were a few paces dillant behind. As their man- 
ner did not appear to indicate any hoftile defign, 
I hefitated not to go up to the oldeft, who ac- 
cepted, with a very good grace, a piece of bifcuit 
I offered him, of which he had feen me eat. I 
then held out my hand to him as a fign of friend- 
iliip, and had the pleafure to perceive, that he 
comprehended my meaning very well : he gave 
me his, inclining himfelf a little, and raifmg at 
the fame time the left foot, which he carried 
backward in proportion as he bent his body for- 
ward. Thefe motions were accompanied by a 
pleafing fmile. 

My companions alfo advanced up to the others, 
and immediately the beft underftanding prevailed 
among us. They received with great joy the neck- 
cloths which we offered them : the young people 
approached nearer to us ; and one of them had 
the generofity to give me a few fmall ihclls of tho 
whelk kind, pierced near the middle, and flrung 
like a necklace. This ornament, which he called 

canJar'ide, 



34 VOYAGE IN SEARCH. [l793. 

canlaride, was the only one he polTeffed, and he 
wore it round his head. A handkerchief fupphed 
the place of this prefent, gratifying the utmoll 
wiflies of my favage, who advanced toward me, 
that I might tie it round his head for him, and 
who expreffed the greatell joy, as he lifted his 
hand up to feel it again and again. We wore 
abundance of clothes, as I have already obfcrved, 
on account of the coldnefs of the nights ; and we 
beftowed the greater part on thefe iflanders. 

The women were very defirous of coming 
nearer to us; and though the men made figns 
to them, to keep at a diftance, their curiofity wns 
ready every moment to break through all other 
confi derations. The gradual increafe of confi- 
dence, however, that took place, obtained them 
permiffion to approach. It appeared to us very 
aflonifliing, that in fo high a latitude, where, at 
a period of the year fo little advanced as the 
prefent, wx already experienced the cold at night 
to be pretty fevere, thefe people did not feel the 
neceiTity of clothing themfelves. Even the wo- 
men were for the moft part entirely naked, as 
well as the men. Some of them only had the 
fliouldcrs and -part of the back covered with a 
kangarou's fkin, worn with the hair next the 
body : and among thefe we obferved two, each 
of whom had an infant at the breail. The fole 

garment 



p£B.] OF LA PEROUSE. 35 

garment of one was a ftrip of kangarou's fkin, 
about two inches broad, w^hich w^as wrapped fix 
or feven times round the waift ; another had a 
collar of fkin round the neck ; and fome had a 
flender cord bound feveral times round the head. 
I afterwards learned, that moft of thefe cords 
were fabricated from the bark of a fhrub of the 
fpurge family, very common in this country. 

A pole-axe, which we ufed for cutting oiF 
fome branches from the trees, excited the admi- 
ration of thefe people. As they perceived us wil- 
ling to give them any thing in our poffeffion, they 
did not fcruple to beg it ; and when we granted 
their requeft, they were overcome with joy. They 
were fully fenfible of the value of our knives, 
likewife ; and received a few tin veffels with 
pleafure. When T fliewed them my watch, it 
attra(5led their defire ; and one of tliem, in par- 
ticular, exprelTed his vvilh to poffefs it : but he 
quickly defifted from his requeft, when he found, 
that I w^as not willing to part with it. 

The readinefs with which we gave them our 
things, no doubt, led them to prefume, that thej 
might take any thing belonging to us, without 
alking for it : this obliged us to fet bounds to 
their defires ; but we found, to our great fatif- 
fadion, that they returned to usj without the 

leaft 



$0 ^ VOYAGE IN SEIrCH [l 7Q3. 

leafl refiftancej fuch things as we could not diA 
penfe with for our own ufe. 

I had given them feveral articles, without re- 
quiring RX^y thing in return : but I wifhed to get 
a kangarou's fkin, when, among the favages about 
us, there happened to be only a young girl, who 
had one. When I propofcd to her, to give it me 
in exchange for a pair of pantaloons, Ihe ran 
away, to hide herfelf in the woods. The other 
natives appeared truly hurt at her refufal, and 
called to her feveral times. At length fhe yielded 
to their intreaties, and came to bring me the fkin. 
Perhaps it was from timidity only, that fhe could 
not prevail on herfelf to part with this kind of 
garment ; in return for which fhe received a pair 
of pantaloons, lefs ufeful to her, according to the 
cuftoms of the ladies in this country, than the 
fkin, which ferved to cover the fhoulders. We 
fhewed her the manner of wearing them ; but, 
notwithfcanding, it was neceilliry for us, to put 
them on for her ourfelves-. To this flie yielded 
with the bell grace in the world, refting both 
her hands on our fhoulders, to fupport herfelf, 
while fhe lifted up firft one leg, then the other, to 
put them into this new garment. Defirous of 
avoiding every caufc of offence, we behaved with 
all -the gravity we could on the occafion. 

The 



Feb.] of la perouse. 3f 

This party of favages confifted of two and 
forty, fcvcn of whom were men, eight women : 
the refi appeared to be their children ; and among 
thefe we obferved feveral marriageable girls, ftill 
lefs clothed than moft of the mothers. We in- 
■vdted them all to come and fit near our fire ; 
and when they arrived there, one of the favages 
informed us by unequivocal figns, that he had 
come to reconnoitre us during the night. That 
we might underftand he had feen us afleep, he 
inclined his head on one fide, laying it on the 
palm of his right hand, and clofing his eyes ; and 
with the other he pointed out the fpot, where 
we had palled the night. He then acquainted 
us, by figns equally expreffivc, that he was at the 
time on the other fide of the brook, whence he 
obferved us. In fa(5l, one of us had been awaken- 
ed about the middle of the night by a ruftling 
among the branches, and had even fancied, that 
he heard fome broken off: but, being greatly fa- 
tigued, he had foon fallen afleep again, perfuaded 
it was a kangarou, that had come to vifit us. Our 
fire had been a guide to this native, whom the 
party had fent to reconnoitre us : while wc had 
llept with the utmoft tranquillity, notwithftand- 
ing we had been at the mcrpy of tbcfe favages 
the whole night. One of the men that accom- 
panied us, then laid, that in tlic evening, at fun- 

fet. 



38 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l793. 

fet, he pcrcciVed fome fmoke on the other fide of 
the lake, whence he prefumed, that fome of the 
natives were aflembled there ; but he forgot to 
mention it to us, when we joined them. 

We weredefirous of fliowing thefe favages the 
efFeds of our fire-arms, after having given them 
to underftand, that they had nothing to fear. 
The)* appeared, however, to be a little frightened 
at their report. 

Thefe people have w^oolly hair, and let their 
beards grow^ Plates VI, \^II, and VIII, will give 
more accurate ideas of their perfons, and exhibit 
the charafteriftics that diflinguifli them morp 
{Irikingl)^ than a long and minute dcfcription. 
It may be obferved (Plate VII), that in the chil- 
dren the upper jaw advanced confiderably bejond 
the lower ; but fmking as they grow up, botli 
jaws are nearly even in the adult. Their fkin is 
not of a ver)^ deep black ; but no doubt they con- 
fider extreme blacknefs as a beauty, for, in order 
to heighten this colour beyond its natural ftate, 
they rub themfelves over, particularly on the 
upper parts of the body, with powdered charcoal. 

On their {kin, particularly on the breaft and 
ftioulders, may be obferved tubercles lymmetri- 
cally arranged, exhibiting fometimes lines four 
inches in length, at other times points placed at 
different diltances. The application, by which 

thefe 



Feb.] of la perouse. 39 

thefe rifings were produced, had not deilroyed the 
cellular membrane, however, for they were of 
the fame colour as the reft of the ll^hi. 

The cuftom of extracting two of the front 
teeth of the upper jaw, which, from the accounts 
of fome voyagers, had been fuppofed general 
among the inhabitants of this country, certainly 
has not been introduced into this tribe ; for we 
did not fee one among them, in whom a fmgle 
tooth of the upper jaw was wanting ; and indeed 
they had all very good teeth. 

One of the failors, that accompanied us, 
thought he could not regale them better than 
with a glafs of brandy : but, accuftomed to drink 
nothing but water, they quickly fpit it out, and 
it feemed to have given them a very difagreeable 
fenfation. 

Thefe favages, going completely naked, are 
liable to wound themfelves, particularly in the 
lower extremities, when they pafs through the 
woods. We obferved one, who walked with dif- 
culty, and one of whofe feet was wrapped up in 
a piece of Ikin. 

I had not perceived the young girls for fome 
time, and imagined that they had all retired into 
the woods ; but happening to look behind me, I 
faw, with furprife, feven who had perched them- 
fclves on a ftout limb of a tree, more than three 

yards 



40 t'OTAGE IN SEARCH [^7Q3* 

yards from the ground, whence they attentively 
watched our ifhghteft movements. As they all 
fquatted on the bough, they formed a plcafmg 
group. 

We were at a coniiderable diftance from the 
fiiore, where a boat w as to wait for us, to take 
us on board. It was time for us to be on our way 
towafd it. We were quitting this peaceable party 
with re2:ret, when we faw the men and four of 
the youths feparating from the reft, iii order to 
accompany us. One of the moft robuft prefently 
went into the wood, whence he returned almoft 
inftantly, holding in his hand tw^o long fpears. 
As he came near, he made figns to us, that wc 
heed be under no apprehenfions : on the con- 
trary, it appeared as if he were defirous of proted:- 
ing us with his arms. No doubt they had left 
their weapons in the wood, when they came to 
meet us in the morning, that they might give us 
no alarm. 

The other natives, whom we had juft quitted, 
approached our party. Immediately on our re- 
quefting him, who carried the fpears, to give us 
a fpecimen of his dexterity, he grafped one of 
them with the right hand near the middle, then 
railing it as high 'as his head, and holding it hori- 
zontally, he drew it back toward himfelf three 
times following with a jerk, which gave it a very 

perceptible 



Feb.] bF LA PERotrsE. 41 

perceptible tremtilous movement at each extre- 
mity, when he darted it forward near a hundred 
paces. The weapon, fupported throughout its 
whole length by the column of air beneath it, 
flew in a tolerably horizontal dired:ion more than 
three fourths of the diftance. The tremulous 
motion imprefled on it contributed, unqueftion- 
ably, to accelerate its progrefs, and to fupport it 
longer in the air. 

The favage was very ready to gratify our wifhes, 
by launching his fpear feveral times following. 
He then aimed at an objeft, which we pointed 
out to him, and every time was near enough to 
it, to give us a high idea of his ll^ill. Prefently 
after another Ihowed us two holes in a kangarou's 
fkin, which had been made apparently with the 
point of a fpear, giving us thus to underftand, that 
they employed this weapon to kill thefe animals. 
In reality, they launched jt with fufficient force 
to pierce the animal through and through. 

At length we parted with our new guides, 
whofe pace was fufficiently flow for us to follow 
them with eafe. It feemed as if they were not 
accuftomed to take a long walk without inter- 
ruption : for we had fcarcely been half an hour 
on our way, before they invited ^s to fit down, 
faying medi ; and we immediately ftoppedi- This 
halt lafted but a few ihinutes, when they rofe. 

Vol. IL D faying 



4.2 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [iTOo. 

faying to us tangara, whjch fignifics " let us let 
off." On this we refumed our journey : and they 
made us halt again, in the fame manner, four 
times, at nearly equal diftances. 

The attentions lavifhed on us by thefe favages 
aftonifhed us. If our path were interrupted by 
heaps of dry branches, fome of them walked be- 
fore, and removed them to either fide : they even 
broke off fuch as ftretched acrofs our way. from 
the trees that had fallen down. 

We could not walk on the dry grafs without 
flipping every moment, particularly where the 
ground was floping ; but thefe good favages, to 
prevent our' falling, took hold of us by the arm, 
and thus fupported us. We found it difficult to 
perfuade them that none of us w^ould fall, even 
if imaffifted ; and they continued, neverthelefs, 
to beftow on us thefe marks of affectionate kind- 
ncfs : nay, they frequently ftationed themfelves, 
one on each fide, to fiipport us the better. As 
they obftinatcly perfifted in paying us this oblig- 
ing attention, we no longer declined it. 

They no doubt conceived it to be our intention 
to return to Port Dentrccafteaux, for we were 
twice miftaken in the road, and they both times 
pointed out to As that w^hich led dircdly to it. 

A trifling incident gave us reafon to prefume, 
that they fometimcs catch birds with their hands. 

' . A paroquet. 



Feb.] of la perouse. 43 

A paroquet, of the fpecies figured in Plate X. 
which I fhall defcribe prefently, flew by us, and 
pitched on the ground at a little diftance. Im- 
mediately two of the young favages fet ofF to 
catch it, and were on the point of putting theif 
hands upon it, when the bird took wing. 

It may be prefumed, that there are no fnakes 
at Diemen's Cape, the bite of which is to be 
dreaded : at leaft, if there be any fuch, the na- 
tives well know how to difliinguiih them. They 
pointed out one to us, gliding through the grafs 
very near them, yet they did not appear to be un- 
der the leaft appreheniion from it. 

At length they brought us near the place, 
■wher€ we had anchored the year before. The 
oldeft of them was very thirfty ; and immediately 
made one of the youths fetch him an oyfter-lhell, 
to ferve as a cup, which he emptied feveral times 
before his thirft was quenched. 

As we were very near the garden, which had 
been formed the preceding year by Citizen La- 
haye, gardener to the expedition, -we refolved to 
vifit it, and took the opportunity, when the fa- 
vages had featcd themfelves. We wiilied to leave 
them with our two failors, left they fliouid go and 
do any injury to fuch vegetables as might have 
fucceeded ; but one of them was refolved to ac- 
company us. He examined attentively the plants 

D 2 in 



44 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l793. 

in the garden, and pointed them out with his 
£nger, appearing to diftinguifh them pertedly 
from their indigenous vegetables. We faw, with 
regret, that there remained only a fmall number 
ot cabbages, a few potatoes, fome radilhes, crefles, 
wild fuccory, and forrel, all in a bad condition : 
no doubt they would have fucceeded better, had 
they been fown nearer a rivulet, which we ob- 
ferved to the weft. I expected to ha\ e found fomc 
creffes at Icaft fown on its banks ; that I did not 
muft furely have been owing to forgetfulnefs on 
the part of the gardener. 

Our boat was not yet arrived. We were very 
defirous that thefe favages fhould have a near view 
of it ; and we hoped, likewife, to be able to pre- 
vail on fome of them to go on board with us ; 
but they were already leaving us to rejoin their 
families. At our invitation, however, they de- 
ferred their departure, and we walked together 
along the beach toward the entrance of the har- 
bour. Sorhe trees, that lay on the ground along 
the ihore, gave them an opportunity of difplaying 
their agility to vis by leaping over them. We were 
too much fatigued to give them an exhibition of 
what we were capable of doing ; but I believe, 
favages as they were, they would have found 
themfelves excelled by an European tolerably ex- 
pert at this excrcifc. 

As 



Feb.] of la perouse. 45 

As foon as the boat came, we invited fome of 
them to go on board her with us. After taking 
a long while to refolve on it, three of them con- 
fented to get into the boat ; but it appeared that 
they had no intention to quit their party, for 
they got out again in great hafte, as foon as we 
prepared to pufh off from the fllore. 

We then faw them walk with tranquillity 
along the fea-fide, looking toward us from time 
to time, and uttering cries of joy. ^ 

10th. The next day we returned in a large party 
to thefe favages. 

We rowed along the fhore, beyond Port Dentre- 
cafteaux, for fome time, when a fire we perceived 
not far from the fea-fide induced us to land. 

Some of the natives foon came to m^et us, 
expreffing by their cries the pleafure they Uilt at 
feeing us again. 

Our mufician had brought on fhore his violin, 
Imagining that he fliould excite as much enthu- 
fiafm among them by fome noify tunes, as we 
had obferved in the iflanders at Bouka ; but his 
felf-love w^as truly mortified, at the indifference 
ihown to his performance here. Savages, in ge- . 
neral, are not very fenfible to the tones of ftringed 
inftruments. 

As we afcended the heights that fkirt the fea, 
we foon found a party of thofe natives, by whom 

D 3 we 



40 • VOYAGIi IN S.EARCn [3.7^3. • 

we had been fo civilly rccjeivcd the day before. A 
lively joy was depided on all their features, when 
they faw us drawing near. There were nineteen 
of them, round three fmall fires, making their 
meal on bernacles, which they roalted on the 
coals, and ate as faft as they were ready. Every 
now and then fome of the women went to pick 
'thefe flicll-fifh from under the neighbouring 
rocks, and did not return till they had filled their 
bafkets with them. On the fame fires we ob- 
ferved them broil that fpecies of fea- wrack, which 
is called fiicfis palmat7is, and when it wasfoftened 
to a certain point, they tore it to pieces to eat it. 
The pains taken by one of the mothers to 
quiet her infant, yet at the breaft, who cried at the. 
firft fight of us, appeared to us very engaging. 
She could not pacify him, till Ihe covered his eyes 
with her hand, that he might not fee us. 

None of thefe people appeared with arms : but, 
probably, they had left them in the wood near ; 
for feveral of us having exprefied an intention of 
going into it, one of the favages urgently entreat- 
ed them not to go that way. Our people did 
not pcrfift in it, lefi; they fiiould give them fome 
caufe of miftrufi: : part of the boat's crew, how- 
ever, in order to deceive the vigilance ot this ccn- 
tinel, walked a little way along the fliorc, that 
they might enter the wood, without being ob- 

ferved 



Feb.]' of la perouse. ^47 

ierved by him ; but no fooner. did one of the wo- 
men perceive their defign, than Die uttered hor- 
rible cries, to give notice to tlie other favages, wh^ 
mtreated them to return toward the fea. 
', . We did not know to what to afcribe their re- 
pugnance for our viands, but they would tafte 
none that we offered them. They would no^ 
even fuffer their children to eat the fugar we gave 
them, being very careful to take it out of their 
mouths the moment they were going to tafle it. 
Yet their confidence in us was fo great, that one 
of the women, who was fuckling a child, was 
not afraid to entrull it to feveral of us. 

1 imagined that thefe people, palTmg moft of 
their nights in the open air, in a climate of which- 
the temperature is fo variable, mufl have been 
fubje(ft to violent inflammations of the eyes : yet 
all of them appeared to have their fight very 
good, one only excepted, who had a catarad:. 

Some of them fat on kangarou's fkins, and 
fome others had a little pillow, which they called 
roere, near a quarter of a yard long, and covered 
with fkin, on which they refhed one of their el- 
bows. 

We obferved with furprize the fmgular pof- 
ture of the women, when they fit on the ground. 
Though for the moil part they are entirely naked, 
it appears to be a point of decorum with thefe 

D 4 ladies. 



48 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l793. 

ladies, as they iit with their knees afunder, to 
cover with one foot, what modefly bids them con- 
ceal in that fituation. 

Thefe people fecmed to be Co near!) in a ftatq 
of nature, that their moft trifling actions appeared 
to me worthy of obfervation. I fhall not pais 
over in filence, therefore, the correction a father 
gave one of his children, for having thrown a 
ftone at the back of another younger than him- 
felf : it was merely a light flap on the fhoulder, 
which made him fhed tears, and prevented his 
doing fo again. 

The painter to the expedition expreiTed to thefc 
favages a wiili of having his fkin covered like 
theirs with the powder of charcoal. His requeft, 
as might naturally be fuppofed, was favourably 
received ; and immediately one of the natives fe- 
led:ed fome of the moft friable coals, which he 
ground to powder by rubbing them between his 
hands. This powder he applied to all the parts 
of the body that were uncovered, employing no- 
thing to make it adhere befide the rubbing of the 
hand, and our friend Piron was prefently as black 
as a New-Hollander. The favage appeared highly 
fatisfied with his performance, which he finifhed 
by gently blowing off the duft that adhered very 
{lightly, taking particular care to remove all that 
might have gotten into tlie eyes. 

When 



Feb.] of tA >EiiOTJSE. -i'O . 

When we departed for Port Dentrecafteaux, 
more than half thefe peaceable natives rofe to 
accompany us. Four young girls alfo were of 
^e party, who received with indifference the 
garments we gave them, and, that they might 
not be encumbered with an ufelefs burden, im- 
mediately hung them on the bufhes near the path, 
intending, no doubt, to take them with them on 
their return. As a proof that they fet little va- 
lue on fuch prefents, we did not fee on any of 
them one of the garments that we h^d given 
them the day before. Three of thefe young wo- 
men were marriageable, and all of them were of 
very cheerful difpofitions. In one of them it was 
obferved that the right brcaft had acquired its full 
fize, while the left was ftill perfedliy flat. This 
temporary deformity had no effe<5l on the liveli- 
nefs of her manner. They feveral times ran races 
on the fhore, which was very fmooth, and fome of 
us endeavoured to catch them ; when we had the 
pleafure to fee, that Europeans could frequently 
run better than thefe favages. 

The men followed with a grave pace, each 
carrying his hands refting one againfl: the other 
upon his loins ; or fometimes the left hand paffing 
behind the back, and grafping the right arm about 
the middle. 

No doubt we loft much by not underftanding 

the 



^fO V,(>;^;AG:E,>K ^EiARCH [1795;. 

the language of thcfc natives, for one of the girls 
faid a great deal to us ; file talked a long w hilc 
with extraordinary volubility;' though llie muft 
have perceived that we could not comprehend 
her meaning ; no matter, flie muft talk. 

The others attempted more than once to charm 
us by fongs, with the modulation of which I was 
Angularly ftruck, from the great analogy of the 
tunes to thole of the Arabs in Afia Minor. Seve- 
ral times two of them fung the fame tune at 
once, but always one, a third, above the other, 
forming a concord with the grcatefl juftnefs. 

Aiiiid thcfe fands grew a fpecics of ficoides, in 
almoil: every point refembling the juefcmhry anther- 
nmm cdule, or eatable fig-marigold of the Hotten- 
tots. It differed completely in the colour of the 
flowers, indeed, which were red, while thofe of 
the fi^r-mariffold of the Hottentots are vellow ; 
but it bore fruit like it, much refembling in fla- 
A'our a very ripe apple. This fruit is a delicacy 
among the New-Hollanders, who feek for it with 
care, and eat it as foon as they find it. 

During this long walk, fomc of our compa- 
. nions took us by the arm from time to time to- 
aflill us. 

One of the young girls having perceived at a 
diflance a head, which the gunner of the Efpc- 
rance had carved on the Hump of a tree, appear- 
ed 



Feb.] of la peroijse. 51 

ed at firit; extremely furprized, and ftopped fliort 
for a moment. She then went up to it with us, 
and;, after having confidcred it attentively, named 
to us the different parts, pointing them out at 
the fame time with the hand. 

Soon after we arrived at the entrance of Port 
Dentrecafteaux. 

Two of the young girls followed the different 
windings of the fiiore without miftrilll, at a dis- 
tance from the other natives, with three of our 
failors, when thefc took the opportunity of one of 
the moft retired places, to treat them with a de- 
gree of freedom, which was received in a very dif- 
ferent manner from what they had hoped. The 
young women immediately fled to the rocks 
moft advanced into the fea, and appeared ready 
to leap into it, and Iwim away, if our men had 
followed them. They prefently repaired to the 
place, where we v*ere alTembled with the other 
favages ; but it feems they did not d'liclofe this 
adventure, for the moft perfe(^ harmony conti- 
nued to prevail between us. 

Wifliing to know whether thefc ijflanders wefe 
C!xpert fwimmers, one of our officers jumped into 
the water, and dived feveral times ; but it was in 
vain that he invited them to follow his example. 
They are very good divers, however, as we had 
afterwards an opportunity of feeing, for it is by 

diving 



52 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l703. 

diving they procure a confiderable part of their 
food. We invited them to eat v^^ith us fome oyf- 
ters and lobfters, which we had jufh roafled on 
the coals; but they all refufed, one excepted, 
who tafted a lobfter. At firft we imagined that 
it was yet too ear)y for their meal-time ; but in 
this we were miftaken, for it was not long before 
they took their repaft. They themfelves, how- 
ever, drefled their food, which was fhell-fifh of 
the fame kinds, but much more roafted than what 
we had offered them. 

We obferved fome of the favages employed in 
cutting little bits of wood in the form of a fpatula, 
and fmoothing them with a fhell, for the purpofe 
of feparating from the rocks limpets and fea-ears, 
on which they feaft as they get ready. 

The time for our returning on board arrived, 
but none of the natives would accompany us, 
they all leaving us, and retiring into the woods. 

1 1th. The engineer- geographer of the Re- 
cherche went in the barge on the 1 1th in the 
morning, to examine the extent of the vaft bay 
that h at the entrance of Dentrecafteaux ftrait. 
For this ftrait we were foon to fet fail. 

In the courfe of the day we quitted all the 
places we had occupied on fliore during our ftay 
in Rocky Bay. The repairs of both veflels were 
finiihed. The trial made the year before of tlie 

wood 



Feb.] of la perouse. 5Z 

wood of the eucalyptus globulus, induced our car- 
penters to employ it in preference to the other 
fpecies of the fame genus. 

For my part I entered into the thick woods to 
the north -weft of us. Several fpecies of fhrubs, 
of the piftada family, grow under the fhade of 
the large trees ; and the^^^^r^ evod'ta diftinguilh- 
ed itfelf by its beautiful foliage. In thefe gloomy 
places the eye refted with pleafure on the car- 
podontos lucida, the branches of which were quite 
covered with fine white flowers. 
• As I advanced toward the fouth-weft, I croiTed 
fome open fpots, where I killed a beautiful fpecies 
of paroquet, which I diftinguifh by the name of 
the black-fpotted paroquet of Diemen's Cape 
(See Plate X.). I had already met with it in fe- 
veral other places, but always fuch as were low, 
and deftitute of covert. Very different from the 
known fpecies of the fame genus, it does not 
perch, for 1 uniformly obferved it rife from among 
the grafs, on which it almoft immediately fettled 
again. The fhape of the feet, which are furnifhed 
with very long claws but little curved, fufHciently 
indicate the manners of the bird. Its plumage is 
green, fpotted with black ; fome of the fpots be- 
ing furrounded with little yellowifh bands. The 
under part of the wings is afhen-grey, with a 
broad band of pale yellow. Under the belly the 

black 



54 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l79^. 

black and yellow predominate. The under fea- 
thers of the tail are remarkable for tranfverfc 
bands, alternately black and pale yellow. A few 
imall reddiih feathers are obfervable at the bafc 
of the beak at the upper part of the fuperior 
mandible. 

1 2th. The next day a great number of us, from 
both fhips, landed near Port Dcntrecaftcaux, to 
endeavour to fee the favages again. It was not 
long before fome of them came to meet us, 
giving us tokens of the greateft confidence. They 
firft examined with great attention the infides of 
our boats, and then they took us by the arm, and 
invited us to follow them along the ihore. 

We had fcarcely gone a mile before we found 
ourfelves in the midft of eight-and-forty of the 
natives ; ten men, fourteen women, and twenty- 
four children, among whom we obferved as many 
girls as boys. Seven fires were burning, and round 
each was aflembled a little family. 

The leafl of the children, frightened at the 
iight of fuch a number of Europeans, immedi- 
ately took refuge in the arms of their mothers, 
•who laviflied on them marks of the greateft ai- 
fedion. The fears of the children were foon 
removed ; and they fliowed lis, that they were 
not exempt from little paffions, whence arofe 
differences, to which the mothers almoft imme- 

diatelv 



Feb.] of la perousk. S5 

dlately put an end by flight correction ; but they 
foon found it necelTary to ftop their tears by ca- 
refles. 

Wc knew already that thefe favages had little 
tafte for the viohn ; but we flattered ourfelvcs 
that they would not be altogether infenfible to 
its tones, if lively tunes, and very diftin6t in their 
meafure, were played. At firft they left us in 
doubt for fome time; on which our muiician 
redoubled his exertions, in hopes of obtaining 
their applaufe ; but the bow dropped from his 
hand, when he beheld the whole alTcmbly flop- 
ping their cars with their fingers, that they might 
hear no more. 

Thefe people are covered with vermin. We 
admired the patience of a mother, who was a 
long while eiriployed in freeing one of her chil- 
dren from them ; but we obferved with difguft 
that, like moft of the blacks, fhe cruflied theie 
filthy infed:s between her teeth, and then fwal- ^ 
lowed them. It is to be remarked, that apes have 
the fame cuftom. 

The little children were very defirous of every 
thing fliining, and were not afraid to come up to 
us, to endeavour to pull off our buttons. Their 
mothers, lefs curious with refpcCl to their own 
drefs than that of their- children, held them to 

us, 



■50 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l7Q3, 

US, that wc might decorate them with the orna- 
ments which we had intended for themfelves. 

I ought not to omit a waggilh trick, which a 
young favage played one of our people. The 
failor had laid down a bag full of fhell-fifh at the 
foot of a rock : the youth flily removed it to an- 
other place, and let him learch for it a long time 
in vain ; at length he replaced it where the failor 
had left it, and was highly diverted with the trick 
he had played him. 

This numerous party was tranfported with ad- 
miration, when they faw the eiFe^ls of gunpow- 
der thrown on the burning coals. They all in- 
treated us to let them have the pleafure of feeing 
it feveral times. 

Not being able to perfuade themfelves that 
we had none but men among us, they long be- 
lieved, notwithftanding all we could fay, that the 
youngeft of us were women. Their curiofity on 
this head carried them further than we fhould 
have expedled, for they were not to be convinced, 
till they had aflured themfelves of the fad:. 

The women have adopted a mode which I 
imagine our belles will never imitate, though it 
occafions the difappearance of a coniidcrable part 
of the wrinkles that pregnancy occafions. They 
have the ikin of the abdomen marked with three 

large 



Feb.] of la perouse. , 57 

large femicircuiar rifings, one above the other : 
whether from coquetry, or not, would be difficult 
to determine. 

One of the favages had feveral marks of very- 
recent burns on the head* Perhaps they employ 
the actual cautery in many difeafes, which is an 
eftablifhed pradlice among various other people, 
and particularly among moft of the Indians. 

About noon we faw them prepare their repaft* 
Hitherto we had but a faint idea of the pains the 
women take to procure the food requifite for the 
fubfiftcnce of their families. They took each a 
bafket, and were followed by their daughters, 
who did the fame. Getting on the rocks, that 
prbjetfled into the fea, they plunged from them 
to the bottom in fearch of fhell-fifh. When they 
had been down fome time, we became very un- 
eafy on their account ; for where they had dived 
were fea- weeds of great length, among which 
We obferved the fucus pyrlferus, and we feared 
that they might have been entangled in thefe, {o 
as to be unable to regain the furface. At length, 
however, they appeared, and convinced us that 
they were capable of remaining under water twice 
as long as our ableft divers. An inftant was fuffi- 
cient for them to take breath, and then they 
dived again. This they did repeatedly, till their 
bafkets were nearly fuU. Moft of them were 
Vol. II. E providecj, 



as VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l7Q3^. 

provided with a little bit of wood, cut into the 
fhape of a fpatula, of which 1 fpoke above ; and 
with thefe they feparated from beneath the rocks, 
at great depths, very large fea-ears. Perhaps they 
choofe the biggefl, for all they brought were of a 
great fize. 

On feeing the large lobfters, which they had 
in their bafkets, we were afraid that they mufh 
have wounded thefe poor women terribly with 
their large claws ; but we foon found, that they 
had taken the precaution to kill them as foon as 
they caught them. They quitted the water only- 
to bring their hufbands the fruits of their labour ; 
and frequently returned almoft immediately to 
their diving, till they had procured a fufficient 
meal for their families. At other times they ftaid 
a little while to warm themfelves, with their 
faces toward the fire on which their fiili was 
roafling, and other tittle fires burning behind 
them, that they might be warmed on all fides at 
once. 

It feemed as if they were unwilling to lofc a 
moment's time, for while they were warming 
themfelves, they were employed in roafling fifli ; 
fome of which they laid on the coals with the 
utmofl caution : though they took little care of 
the lobflers, which they threw any where into the 
fire, and when they were ready, .they divided the 

claws 



Feb.] of la perouse. 5# 

claws among the men and children, referving 
the body for themfelves, which they fometimes 
ate before they returned into the water. 

It gave us great pain to fee thefe poor women! 
condemned to fuch fevere toil ; while, at the fame 
time, they ran the hazard of being devoured by 
lliarks, or entangled among the weeds that rife 
from the bottom of the fea. We often intreated 
their hufbands to take a ihare in their labour at 
leaft, but always in vain. They remained con- 
ftantly near the fire, feafting on the beft bits, and 
eating broiled fucus, or fern-roots. Occafionally 
they took the trouble to break boughs of trees into 
lliort pieces, to feed the fire, taking care to choo/e 
the drieft. From their manner of breaking them, 
we found that their fkulls muft be very hard ; for, 
taking hold .of the fticks at each end with the; 
hand, they bent them over their heads, as we do 
at the knee, till they broke. Their heads being 
conftantly bare, and often expofed to all w eathers, 
in this high latitude, acquire a capacity of refift- 
ing fuch efforts : befides, their hair forms a cufhion, 
which diminifhes the preffure, and renders it 
much lefs painful on the fiimmit of the head, 
than on any other part of the body. ¥tw of the 
women, however, could have done as much ; for 
fome had their hair cut pretty fhort, and wore a 
firing fevcral times round the head, others had 

E 2 only 



60 VOTAGE IN SEARCH [1793. 

only a fimple crown of hair. (See Plates IV, 
and V.) We made the fame obfcrvation with 
rcfpedl to fcveral of the children, but none of the 
men. Thefe had the back, brcaft, lliouldcrs, and 
arms, covered with downy hair. 

Two of the ftouteft of the party were fitting in 
the midft of their children, and each had two 
women by his fide. They informed us by figns, 
that thefe were their wives, and gave us a frcfli 
proof that polygamy is eftabliflied among them. 
The other women, who had only one hufband, 
were equally careful to let us know it. It would 
be difficult to fay which are the happieft ; as the 
moft laborious of their domeftic occupations de- 
volve upon them, the former had the advantage 
of a partner in them, which perhaps might fuf- 
ficiently compenfate their having only a fliare in 
their hufband's affections. 

Their meal had continued a, long time, and 
we were much furprized that not one of thcni 
had yet drank : but this they deferred, till they 
were fully fat^sfied with eating. The women 
and girls then went to fetch water with the vcf- 
fels of fea-weed, of which I have already fpoken, 
getting it at the firft. place they came to, and fct- 
ting it down by the men, who drank it without 
ceremony, though it was very muddy and llag- 
nant. Then they finiilicd their rcpalL 

When 







iii 



c. 






"T 






EV^' 



^^! 



^^l-»'is,-^?<^ 



? "t? ■* '^ 



pi 














^''"f^^" 



Feb.] • OF LA PEROITSE. 61 

When we returned toward Port Dentre- 
cafteaux, moft of the favagcs accompanied us ; 
and before they left us, they gave us to under'- 
ftand, that, in two days, by proceeding along the 
Ihore, they lliould be very near our fhips. To 
inform us that they Ihould make this journey in 
two days, they pointed out with their hands the 
diurnal motion of the fun, and exprefled the num- 
ber two by as many of their fingers. 

When we re -embarked to go on board, thefe 
good people followed us with their eyes for fome 
time, before they left the lliore, and then they 
difappeared in the woods. Their way brought 
them at times to the ihore again, of which we 
were immediately informed by the cries of joy, 
with which they made the air refound. Thefc 
teftimonies 'of pleafure did not ceafe till we loft 
fight of them from the diftancc. 

Durmg the whole time we fpent with them, 
nothing appeared to indicate that they had any 
chiefs. Each family, on the contrary, feemed 
to us, to live in perf<!(^ independence : though 
we obferved in the children the greateft fubor- 
dination to their parents, and in the women the 
fame to their hufbands. It appeared, that the 
women were careful to avoid giving their huf- 
bands any occafion for jealoufy : though, when 
we returned on board, one of the crew boafted of 

E 3 the 



03 VOYAGE I^' SEAUCH [l 793. 

the favours he had received from one of the beau- 
ties of .Gape Dicmen ; but it is difficult to fay, 
how f^r his ftory was founded on truth. 
' " iSth. -On the 24th I made an excurfion to the 
fouth-ealjt, where I found an opportunity of add- 
ing to the obfervations 1 had already made re- 
fped:ing the different produ(5lions of the country. 
14th. The next day every thing was ready for 
our departure, and we waited only for a fair wind 
to fet fail : but being delayed by a calm, we faw 
with pleafure, that the favages, who, at our iaft 
interview, had promifed to come near our an- 
choring-place within two days, had kept their 
w^ords. In fad:, a little before noon we perceived 
a fire not far from our watering-place ; and there 
could be no doubt that it was kindled by them, 
as all our crew were on board. A great num- 
ber of us immediately repaired in feveral boats to 
the place of rendezvous. It was the firft time 
that General Dentrecafleaux had the pleafure of 
feeing any of the natives. They foon quitted 
their fire, and proceeded fbr fome time through 
the paths made in the wood along the fhore, in 
order to come flill nearer to us. We went to 
meet them ; and when we were near them they 
ftopped, appearing well pleafed at feeing us come 
afhore. There were five of them. One of them 
carried a piece of decayed wood in his hand, 

lighted 



Feb.] of la perouse. -65 

lighted at one end, and burning flowly. He ufed 
this kind of match in order to keep fire, and 
amufed himfelf now and then with fetting it to 
a tuft, where there were fome very dry herbs. 
The others being invited by fome of our crew to 
dance in a ring with them, imitated all thek 
movements tolerably well. We made them pre- 
fents of a great number of things, which they let 
us hang round their necks with firings, and foon 
they were almofl. covered with them, apparently 
to their great fatisfadion : but they gave us no- 
thing, for they had brought nothing with them, 
probably that they might walk with the more 
facility. 

A native, to whom we had juft given a hatchet, 
difplayed great dexterity at flriking feveral times 
following in the fame place, thus attempting to 
imitate one of our failors, who had cut down a 
tree. We fhowxd him that he mufl flrike in 
different places, fo as to cut out a notch, which 
he did immediately, and was tranfported with 
joy when the tree was- felled by his flrokes. They 
were aflonifhed at the quicknefs with which we 
fawed the trunk in two ; and we made them a 
prefent of fome hand-faws, which they ufed with 
ffreat readinefs, as foon as we had fhown them 
the way. 

From the manlier in which we had feen them 
E 4 procure 



dt VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l793' 

procure fifh, we had reafon to prefumc that they 
had no fifh-hooks : accordingly we gave them 
fome of ours, and taught them how to ufc them, 
congratulating ourfelves at having fupplicd them 
with the means of diminifliing one of the moft 
fatiguing employments of the women. 

Thefe favages were much furprifcd at feeing 
us kindle the fpongy bark of the eucalyptus rejini-' 
fera in the focus of a burning glafs. He who 
appeared the moll intelligent among them, defir- 
ous of trying the effedls of the lens himfclf, 
threw the converging rays of the fun upon his 
thigh by its means ; but the pain he felt, took 
from him all inclination of repeating the experi- 
ment. 

We let one of the natives fee our fliips through 
a good perfpcd;ive-glafs, and he foon yielded to 
our folicitations, to go on board the Kecherche 
in one of our boats. He \vent up the fide with 
an air of confidence, and examined the infide of 
the Ihip with much attention. His looks were 
then directed chiefly to fuch objeds as might 
fervc for food. Led by the fimilitude in lliape, 
between the black fvvans of Cape Piemen and 
the gcefe of Guinea, which he faw on board, he 
aflied for one, giving us to underftand that it was 
to eat. When he came oppofite to our hen-; 
coops, he appeared ilruck with the beauty of a 

very 



Peb.] of la perouse. 6^5 

very large cock, which was prefented to him ; 
and on receiving it he let iis know, that he would 
lofe no time in broiling and eating it. After 
having remained on board more than half an 
hour, and been loaded with prefents, he defired 
to return, and was immediately carried afliore. 
We had taken an ape on fhorc with us, which 
afforded much amufement to the favagcs ; and 
one of the crew took a goat with him, which 
formed a fubjecfl of converfation for them a long 
time, and to which they occafionally ipoke, fay- 
ing, fnedi (fit down). 

They have given particular names to every 
vegetable. We affured ourfelves, that their bo- 
tanical knowledge was unequivocal, by afking 
feveral of them, at different times, the names of 
the fame plants. 

In this interview we had an opportunity of 
adding confiderably to the vocabulary of their 
language, which we had before begun to colle(5l, 
and which will be found at the end of this work. 
On comparing it with the vocabulary, which 
feveral voyagers have given us, of the language of 
the people on the eaftern coaft of New Holland, 
it will be feen, that it has no affinity with them ; 
which proves, that all thefe people have not one 
common origin. 

The ravage ;^ who had been on board our vefTel, 

was 



66 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l793r, 

was not long before he quitted iis, exprefTing 
much gratitude, and pointing to the cock, which 
he took upon one of his fhouldcrs. 

The reft, before they went away, gave us to 
underftand, that the next day their famihes would 
be at the place where we were ; but they ap- 
peared to apprehend our meaning, when we ac- 
quainted them that we fliould fail the fame day, 
and feemed to be much grieved at it. 

Our obfervatory, erected to the fouth fouth- 
eail of the place where we lay at anchor, and a 
little more than half a mile diftant from it, was in 
latitude 43° 34' 37'' fouth, and longitude 144° 37' 
eaft. 

A great number of obfervations made on board 
gave us for the variation of the needle 7° 34' eaft, 
while at the obfervatory wc found only 2^ 55' 
eaft variation. A difference fo great muft un- 
queftionably have arifen from fomc magnetic 
point ; befides, we had already found indications 
of ferruginous fubftances at a very little diftance 
from the place. It is remarkable that, at the 
obfervatory of the Efperance, which was about 
fix hundred yards only from that of the Re- 
cherche, the variation of the needle was 8° eaft, 
W6^ fatisfied ourfelves that this difference was 
not owing to the compaffes ufed, for we found 
it the fame when we made an exchange be- 
tween 



Feb.] of la perouse. 67- 

tween them, by removing them from one obfer- 
vatory to the other. 

The dip of the needle was 72° at the obfer- 
vatory of the Recherche, and 71" at that of the 
Efperance. 

During our {lay in Rocky Bay, the winds va- 
ried from north- weft to fouth-weft, and fre- 
quently in heavy fqualls. The fky was fcldom 
cldar, but we had little rain. 

The tides were perceptible only once in twxnty- 
four hours. As the wind influenced them much, 
we could not determine with precifion the time 
of high-water at the full and change of the moon. 
■ Their greateft perpendicular rife w^as only five feet, 
or a little more. 

During this ftay, our failors loft much of their 
ardour for fifhing ; for this laborious occupation, 
in which they were employed chiefly by night, 
did not exempt them from the duties of the lliip 
in the day ; fo that, after having fitten up to fifli, 
they were obliged to work all day, as well as 
thofe who had enjoyed their regular fleep in the 
night. Care fliould have been taken, however, 
not to damp the zeal of our hftiers, for it was 
an obje<5l of general importance to all, to procure 
an ample fupply of frefli provifion ; befides, it 
was unjuft not to allow at leaft a few hours reft 
in the day to men, who had been fpending the 

night 



C8 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [1/^3, 

Tiij^ht in procuring agreeable and falubrlous food 
for all the reft of the crew. 

We fet afliorc here a ihe-goat and a young he- 
goat, in hopes of naturalizing thefe animals in 
New Holland, as they could not fail to thrive on 
the mountains at this extremity of the country, 
and prove at fome future period a great refource 
to navigators : it is only to be feared, that the 
favages may deftroy them, before they have had 
time to propagate their breed. 



»9^c.»« 



CHAP. XI. 

Departure from Rocky Bay to pafs tlirougli Dentre- 
cafteaux Strait — The Ships run aground m this 

' Strait — Various Kxcurjjons into the neighhour- 
ing Country — Interview with the Natives — They 
had left their lFeap07is in the Woods y and rcfumed 
them 071 their Return — W^e anchor iji Adventure 
Bay. 

]5th FEBRUARY. 

AT day-break we fet fail from Rocky Bay 
with a fouth-weft wind, and fteered eaft- 
north-eaft till wx reached its mouth, intending 
to caft anchor in Dentrccafteaux Strait. 

Some of the natives gave us notice of their 

prefence 



Feb.] of la perouse. 60 

prefence by feveral fires, which they had lighted 
on the ea{le^^ coaft. 

We had already crolTed the great road, which 
is at the beginning of the Strait, and were run- 
ning along \xry clofe to the larboard Ibore, when 
about half after one, P. M. we ftruck on a fmaii 
Ihoal, confifting of fand mixed with mud. The 
ebb had juft begun to fet the current againft us ; 
and the tide falling lower and lower, we were 
obliged to wait till half after fix for high water, to 
iet us afloat again. The Efperance had gotten 
ftill deeper in the fand than we, for ihe was not 
able to get off till near dight o'clock. 

Our boat, which had been fcnt off five' days 
before, returned, after having difcovered feterai 
very deep creeks, that formed excellent anchor- 
ing places, but without finding any river. It is 
remarkable, that all we had feen at Cape Die- 
men were fmall, which indicates a very broken 
country. 

The boat was laden with black fwans, lliot by 
our people, w^hom they futFered to come very near 
them. It was .not ealy to get thofe that had 
been merely wounded ; for, as they could ftili 
fwim with great fpeed, it was necefiary to row 
hard, to catch them even then. 

iOth. During the whole night we faw feveral 

fires. 



70 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l 7Q3. 

£res, which the natives had kindled on the bor- 
ders of the fea toward the fouth-fouth-caft, near 
two miles from the place where we had anchored. 

We hoped that a fair w4nd would have allowed 
ws to fet fail again in the morning ; but the wind 
proving contrary, the General determined that 
he would remain at anchor till the next day. 
Accordingly we went afhore toward the fouth- 
eaft, on fome low ground, whence it w^as eafy 
to reach Adventure Bay in a Ihort time. 

Among the different fhrubs that conftitute the 
ornaments of thefe places, I fhall mention one, 
which I refer to the genus, that I have already' 
defcribed under the name of ma%eiitoxero7i. It 
agrees with this genus in all its chara(5ters ; only 
the petals, which are diftind: at the bafe, adhere 
together at the middle of their edges, but they 
may be Separated without breaking thcm^ The 
ftyle is Umplcand acute. 

To this new fpccies I give the name of nia- 
"zeutoxeron reflexum, on account of its leaves, 
which are- inclined toward the ground. They 
are hairy and whitifli beneath. 

The flowers are grecnifh, folitary, and iifue 
out between two fmall oval leaves : toward the 
middle of the peduncle they have two filiform 
appendices a little larger than the calyx. 

Explanation 




t.'i%i'2:^<'<<^w^>w? A ejr/eac/<?n 



J'eb.] of la pe^quse./ 71 

Explanation of the Figures, Plate XIX, 

Fig. 1. A branch. 
Fig. 2. The flower. 
Fig. 3. The corolla. 

Fig. 4. The corolla difplayed, to fhow how the 
petals adhere together laterally. 

Fig. 5. The calyx, with the ftamens and ger- 
men, the corolla having been removed. 

Fig. 0. The capfule, beneath which the calyx 
is feen. 

Fig. 7. One of the valves of the capfule. 
Citizen Beaupre, engineer geographer, fet ofF 
in the evening, in the General's barge, for the 
great creek, which we had perceived the preceding 
year to the north, in failing outofDentrecafteaux 
Strait. The principal object was, to afcertaiii 
whether it had any opening that communicated 
with the main fea, and whether the ifland of 
Maria was really feparated from the land of New 
Holland ; for this had not been fufficiently re- 
folved by Marion, or even by Captain Cook. 

The wind continuing to the north all the 1 7th, 
prevented our weighing anchor, and we went 
afliore, while our fijQiers proceeded tow^ard the 
mouth of the ftrait. The flood brought in with 
it a confiderable quantity of fifli, and they caught 
feveral fpecies of ray of a lai:^e fize.- Some were 

found 



72 VOYAGfi IN SfiAtlCH [l79'^» 

found to weigh upwards of two hundred and ilxty 
pounds. 

We got under way the ne^t morning ; but the 
"wind was too faint, to enable us to ftem the cur- 
rent, which fet againll us, fo that we quickly let 
go our anchor again. 

Toward noon fome of the natives appeared on 
the eaftern fhore, about half a mile from our fliip. 
Some others foon joined them ; and we could 
count as many as ten, when they kindled a fire, 
and feated themfclvcs round it. From time to 
time they anfwered with fliouts of joy the fhouts 
of our failors. We haftened on fliore in a larire 
party, to have a nearer view of them ; and when 
we were but a little way from the beach, they 
advanced toward us without arms, their fmiling 
countenances leaving us no room to doubt that 
our vifit gave them pleafure. They were as defti- 
tute of clothes as thofe whom we had feen in the 
neighbourhood of Port Dentrecafleaux ; but we 
were much furprifed to fee moft of them holding 
the extremity of the prepuce with the left hand ; 
no doubt from a bad habit, for we did not ob- 
ferve any thing of the kind among fom.e others, 
who foon after joined them. Their joy was ex- 
prelfed by loud burfts of laughter ; at the fame 
time they carried their hands to their heads, and 
made a quick tapping with their feet on the 

ground. 



Feb.] of la perouse. 73 

ground, while their countenances iliowed, that 
they were well pleafed to fee us. 

We invited them to fit down, fpcaking in the 
language of the other natives, whom we had al- 
ready met with at this extremity of New Hol- 
land ; and they underftood us very well, immedi- 
ately acceding to our invitation. They under- 
ftood likewife the other words of the language of 
thefe people, which we had coUe^ed from them, 
and we had no doubt, that they fpoke the fame 
tongue : yet Anderfon has given to the public 
fome words of the language of the people of 
Adventure Bay, which have no fimilitude to 
thofe, that we had an opportunity of acquiring 
and verifying. 

Thefe favages expreiled much thankfulnefs, 
when wc gave them a few fmall pieces of ftulfs 
of different colours, glafs beads, a hatchet, and 
fome other articles of hardware. 

Several other favages came out of the wood, 
and approached us. There was no woman 
among them, but there were fome young men. 
Among thefe was one of the middle fize, whofe 
figure, which we all admired, was very finely pro- 
portioned, even in the judgment of our painter. 
From his drefs we prefumed this favage to be a 
New Holland beau : he was tatooed with great 

Vol. II , F fymmetry. 



74 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [j 7Q3. 

iymmctry, and his hair, plaftered with grcafe, 
was well powdered with" ochre. 

One of the natives gave us to underftand, that 
he had feen veflels in Adventure Bay before : 
probably he fpoke of Bligh, who had anchored 
there in the beginning of 17Q2, as we learned 
fome days after from feveral infcriptions, which 
we found carved on the trunks of trees. 

An officer belonging to our fhip imagined, that 
he ftiould itot frighten them, by letting them fee 
the efFe6ts of our fire-arms : but as moft of them 
were not previouily informed of his defign, they 
were alarmed at the report of the gun, immedi- 
ately rofc, and w^ould not fit down again. Sup- 
pofmg their w^ves and children were retired to a 
little diftance in the wood, we expreffed to them 
our wilhes to fee them join us ; and the favagcs 
informed us that we fhould find them, after 
Vv'alking fome time acrofs the wood in a path, 
which led toward the fouth-fouth-weft, and 
which they immediately took, inviting us to fol- 
low them. This we did : but it was not long 
before they expreifed their defire to fee us return 
toward our fhips, and parted from us, frequently 
looking back to watch our motions. 

On my pronouncing tlie word q-iiafigha, how- 
ever, which fignifies, in their language, will you 

comcj 



Feb.] of la perouse, 75 

come, they flopped, and I went up to them with 
one of the officers of the Recherche. They con- 
tinued to lead us along the fame path, which 
appeared much frequented, and we walked flowly, 
that our people might have time to join uS. In 
this way we walked on for a quarter of an hour, 
holding them by the arm, v»hen on a fudden they 
quickened their pace, fo that it was not eafy foi: 
us to follow them farther. It appeared to us, 
that they wifhed we fhould leave them, for fo-me 
of them would not allow us to hold them by 
the arm any longer, and walked by themfelves, 
at ibme diftancc from us. One of our crew, de- 
firous of rejoining one of the fugitives, ran after 
him, bawling out with all his might ; and this 
alarmed all the reft, who immediately haftened 
away, and kept at a confiderable diftance from 
us. No doubt they were defirous to reach the 
place where they had depodted their weapons un- 
accompanied ; for, after having again quickened 
their pace, they ftruck out of the path a little, 
and prefently we faw them with three or four 
fpears each, which they carried away, moft of 
them proceeding toward Adventure Bay, whil© 
others took their courfe to the weft. They then 
invited us to follow them ; but we were not 
willing to go any farther, tor we had no defire 
• F 2 to 



76 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l/QS. 

to imitate them in their courfe, and befidcs it 
was time for us to return on board. 

Thefe natives appeared to us to have the 
greateft refemblance to thofe whom we had feen 
a few days before ; only we obferved fome, in 
whom one of the middle teeth of the upper jaw- 
was wanting, and others in whom both were 
gone. We could not learn the objed. of this 
cuftom ; but it is not general, for the greater part 
of the people had all their teeth. 

They appeared to be equally ignorant with the 
others of the ufe of the bow. 

Almoft all of them were tatooed with raifed 
points, fometimes placed in two lines, one over 
the other, much in the fhape of a horfe-fhoe ; 
though frequently thefe points were in three 
flraight and parallel lines on each fide of the 
breaft: fome were obferved, too, toward the 
bottom of the Ihoulder blades, and in other 
places. 

In many the navel appeared puffed up, and 
very prominent, but we affured ourfelves, that 
this deformity was not occafioned by a hernia. 
Perhaps it is owing to the too great diftance from 
the abdomen, at which the umbilical cord is fe- 
parated. 

They acquainted us that they lived upon fifh, 

as 



Feb.] of la perouse. 77 

as well as the other inhabitants of Cape Diemen : 
yet I muil obferve, that we did not fee a fingle 
perfon who had the leaft trace of any difeafe of 
the fkin ; which by no means agrees with the 
opinion of thofe, w^ho maintain, that ichthy- 
ophagi are fubjed: to a ipecies of leprofy. Hifto- 
rians even aifert, that fuch of the Greeks as would 
not adopt in Egypt the regimen prefcribed by 
Orpheus, were attacked by the elephantiafis. 

Soon alter ilin-fet wc arrived on board ; w^hen, 
the wind having become fair, we weighed, and 
proceeded two leagues farther, where we dropped 
anchor again. 

1 Qth. The next morning we got up our anchor 
pretty early, but were obliged to let it go again 
almoft immediately, as the wind became foul. 

I then landed on the eaftern fhore, whence I 
penetrated into the woods, taking paths much fre- 
quented by the favages. It w^as not long before 
I perceived a new fpecies of exocarpos, which I 
call exocarpos expanfa, becaufe its branches fpread 
much wider from each other than thofe of the 
exocarpos cuprejjiformls. Its fruit is larger than 
that of the latter fpecies. 

Two guns from the Recherche informed us, 
that fhe was preparing to get up her anchor, and 
immediately we repaired on board. By five o'clock 
we were under fail, but the breeze was fo faint, 

F 3 that 



78 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l703. 

that wc had made little way when night came. 
From the place where wc came to an anchor we 
reckoned now we had not above a couple of 
leagues to the extremity of the ftrait : but we 
were fo delayed by the winds and currents, that 
it was four days longer, before we could clear it. 

In this interval the barge, which the General 
had difpatched for the purpofe of making geo- 
graphical rcfearches, returned after live days ab- 
fence. Citizen Beaupre had difcoTcred feveral 
bays before unknown : the fartheft to the north 
extended to 42'" 42^ of S, lat., and the eaftcrn- 
moft reached to the longitude of Cape Pillar. He 
had feen the channel, which feparatts the Ifland 
of Maria from the main land. 

It was with aftonilhment w^e faw the prodi- 
gious number of iheltered fituations, which, from 
Cape South to the meridian of Cape Pillar, offer 
a continued chain of excellent anchoring places, 
in a fpace including about fixteen leagi^es from 
€aft to weft, and about tw^enty from north to 
fbuth. 

Frefh water appears to be very fcarce in thefe 
bays at this feafon : yet near the head of that, 
which ftretches fartheft to the north, there is a 
river, where, about fifty paces diftant from its 
raouth, there is perfed:ly frefh water of the depth 
of fix feet, even within an hour after flood-tide ; 

for 



Feb. J OF LA PEROUSE. f§ 

for its current is fufficicntly rapid to repel the 
water of the fea, and prevent its minghng with 
the ftream. 

On the 24th, about half after eleven in the 
morning, we anchored in Adventure Bay, iri 
eleven fathoms water, on a bottom of mud mixed 
with a fmall portfon of fand. 

The neareft ihore bore from us fouth-eaft, 
diftant five furlongs, and Penguin Ifland liorth 
dl^'eaft. .' // 

Immediately a boat was diipatched, to fee whe- 
ther it were eafy to furnifli ourfelves with water 
tovk^ard the north-weft, at the place pointed but 
by Captain Cook, in the plan which he his given 
of this bay. The eaft-fouth-eaft winds, however, 
occafioned a very troublefome furf there, which 
induced us to prefer a place to the fouth-eaft ; but 
we found that the water procured there was a 
little brackilh ; which proved, that it was taken 
from a place too low, and too near the fea. 

This bay being open to the eaft and Ibuth-eaft 
winds, they fometimes occaiion a heavy fweli 
on the weftern Ihore, which, tending thither 
from all fides, render it fomewhat difficult to 
land. 

During the time we remained at anchor, I 
made excurfions into the adjacent country every 

F 4 day ; 



80 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l/QS. 

day ; but I found little to add to the numerous 
articles I had colle(5led at Cape Diemen. 

Penguin Ifland, which I vifited, is nothing but 
a hill, fcarcely feparated from the great ifland, 
for at low water I croiTed the channel between 
them almoft dry-fhod. It confifls of a dark gray 
landftone, the fame as forms great part of the 
borders of Adventure Bay. To the fouth it is 
overtopped by Fluted Cape, which is formed of 
a reddifh fandftone, difpofed in parallel ftrata per- 
pendicular to the horizon. The difference of 
tint in thefe flrata exhibit at a diftance the ap- 
pearance of deep flutings, which has given oc- 
cafion to its name. It muft be from an error of 
the prefs, that it is faid Anderfon found this cape 
to confift of a white fandftone. 

On Penguin Ifland I found a new fpecles of 
flate, remarkable for its large laminae of a light 
lawn colour ; an eucalyptus of a moderate height, 
which may readily be diftinguifhed by its op- 
pofite, feffile leaves, of a whitifli green colour, 
with a flight tint of blue (glauquesj ; an embo- 
thriiim, with leaves very deeply indented ; fevera} 
fine fpecies oi ph'dadelphnSy the flowers of which 
have no fmell, &c. 

We found a raft, which the waves had thrown 
upon the wcftern Ihore of Adventure Bay. Per- 
haps 



Feb.] of la perpuse. 81 

haps it had ferved to bring fome favages into this 
bay from the ifland of Maria. It was made of the 
bark of trees ; in fhape nearly rcfemUing that 
which is reprefented in Plate XLVI. fig. 2, being 
as broad, but not fo long by more than a third. 
The pieces of bark, that compofed it, Avcre of 
the fame ftru6lure as that of the eucalyptus re- 
Jin'ifera, but its leaves were much thinner. Thefe 
pieces had been held together by cords, made of 
the leaves of grafles, forming a texture of very 
larse mefhes, mofh of which had the form of a 
pretty regular pentagon. 

Juft by we faw fome limefiione rocks, bounding 
an extenfive fandy Ihore. On its borders we 
found the remains of a place which had been 
made by Europeans for fa wing wood, the pegs 
they had ufed for eredling a tent, and fome large 
logs, on which, it appeared to us, they had placed 
inftruments for making aftronomical obferva- 
tions. 

The fteep hills, which ikirt the fandy fliore a 
littk farther to the north, had in them caves, 
which appeared pretty much frequented by the 
natives, to judge by the black colour they had re- 
ceived from fmoke, and the fhells of lobflers and 
other fifh which we found there. 

Several infcriptions, engraved on the trunks 

of 



82 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [^7QS. 

of trees, acquainted us, that Captain Bligh had 
anchored in this bay in the month of February 
1792; when he was on his voyage to the So- 
ciety Iflands for bread-fruit trees, which he was 
to carry to the Englifli colonies in the Weft In- 
dies lying between the tropics. 

Bligh had with him two botanifts, who fo wed, 
at a little diftance from the fhore, creffes, a few 
acorns, celery, &c. We faw three young fig 
trees, two pomegranate trees, and a quince tree 
they had planted, which had thriven very well : 
but it appeared to us, that one of the trees they 
had planted in this country had already periihed, 
for the following infcription, which we found on 
the trunk of a large tree near, mentions feven : 

Near this Tree Captain WilJtam Bligh planted 
feven Fruit Trees, 17Q2. MeJ/rs. S. and W. 
Botanifts. 

The other infcriptions were couched in nearly 
fimilar terms. They all difplayed the fame marks 
of deference which the Engliill botanifts paid 
the Commander of their fhip, by jnitting only 
the initial letters of their own names, and ex- 
prefting that the Captain himfelf had fowed and 
planted the various vegetable ptodudlions, which 
he had carried from Europe. 1 am m\\d\ inclined 

to 



Feb.] of la perouse. ' 83 

to doubt, whether Bligh was very fenfible to the 
honour w^hich the botanifts were defirous of pay- 
ing him. 

Toward the fouth-eaft, at a little diftance from 
the beach, we found an apple tree, the item of 
which was near fix feet and a half high, and 
about two inches thick. It did not appear to iis 
that it bad ever been grafted. 

Our fifhers w^ere not unfuccefsful at this an- 
choring place. The fires they kindled along the 
fliorc in the night attra<5led a large quantity of 
fifli to their nets. The ftratagem had before 
fucceeded fo completely with the fiiliers of the 
Efperance in Dentrecafteaux Strait, that they had 
laid in a ftock of fiili fufHcient for fome months, 
part dried, and part pickled in ftrong brine. 

Several times in the courfe of the day I was 
prefcnt when they hauled the feine, and always 
obferved fome new fpecies of d'todon (porcupine 
lifh). I admired the readinefs with which thefc 
little fifhes eredled the prickles' that cover them, 
by diftending their bodies as foon as they were 
touched : but they lowered them, and kept them 
clofe to their fkin, throughout their w^hoie length, 
as foon as they imagined themfelves out of dan- 
ger. This obfervation fliows, that the altitude 
given to filh of this genus, by diilending them as 
much as poffible, in which manner they are ex- 
hibited 



84 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l 793. 

hibited in colledions of natural hiflory, is not that 
which is mofl: ufual to them. 

Near the north fliore of this 'bay we landed a 
young he- goat, and a fhe-goat big with kid, put- 
ting up our prayers that the favages might allow 
them to'propagate their breed in this ifland. Per- 
haps they may multiply in it to fuch a degree, as 
to occafion a total change in the manner of life 
of the inhabitants, who may then become a paf- 
toral people, quit without regret the borders of 
the fea, and tafte the pleafurc of not being obliged 
to dive in learch of their food, at the rifk of 
being devoured by Iharks. The women, who 
are condemned to this toilfome occupation, will 
be much more fenfible of the value of fuch a 
prefent than the men : but it is to be feared that 
thefe animals will be killed before they have time 
to breed, as appears to have happened to the fow 
and boar left by Captain Cook ; at leafV no one 
of us ever perceived the ilighteft trace of thefe 
animals. 

The latitude of cur obfervatory, which was 
near a mile and a quarter fouth from our anchor- 
ing place, was 43'' 21^ 18" fouth, and its longi- 
tude 145^ 12^ 17" eaft. 

The variation of the needle, obferved at the 
fame place, was 7° 30^ eaft. 

CHAP. 



March.] of la perouse. 85 



CHAP. XII. 

Departure from Adventure Bay — We pafs clofe by 
the North End of New Zcala?id — Intervieiv 
with the hiJiahitants — Di/covery of fevera^ 
Iflands hitherto imhioztm — Anchor at Tongata- 
boo, one of the Friendly IJlarids — Kagernefs of 
the Natives to come on hoard andfurnifli us with 
freJJi Provifion — We fait a great Nwiher of Hogs 
— The Iflanders gredtly addi£ied to Theft — One 
of our Sentinels hiocked down in the Night by a 
Native, whoflole his Mujket — The Affajfn deli- 
vered to General Dentrecajleaux by Ki?ig Toohou, 
who re/lores the Mujket that had been Jiolen — 
Queen Tine comes on hoard — Toohou gives a Feaft 
to the General — Queen Tine alfo does the fame — 
The Smith of the Recherche is blocked dow?i with 
Clubs by the Natives, who afterwards firip him, 
in open Day, in Sight of our Veffels — Some young 
Bread-Fruit Trees are taken on board to enrich 
our Colonies with this valuable Produ^ion. 

ift MARCH. . - 

'TX7"E fet fail from Adventure Bay about eight 

' "^ in the morning, with hard fqualls from 

the fouth-weft, which foon carried us beyond 

Cape Pillar, behind which wc faw feveral fires 

kindled 



80 VOYAGE IN SEARClt [1793. 

kindled by the favages. We then fleered to- 
-ward the north, where we were in f^ght of the 
coaft about fixteen leagues diftant, leaving Oyfter 
Bay to the weft, and then we dire(5led 6ur courfe 
for the Friendly Iflands. 

At day-break, on the 1 3 th, we made the iflands 
called the Three Kings. 

About eight o'clock, being in longitude 169^ 
56^eaft, we fet the middle ifland of the group 
north, diftant one league, and afcertained its la- 
titude to be 34*' 20^ fouth. 

We faw three principal crocks, of a moderate 
height, nearly in the fame parallel, at no great 
diftance from each other, and furrounded by 
other rocks that were much fmaller. Notwith- 
ftanding the fog that had juft come on, we dif- 
tinguilhed fome more toward the north, making 
a part of the fame clufter. They were very bare, 
and we did not fuppofe them to be inhabited: but 
a large column of fmoke, arifmg from the eaft- 
ernmoft iflet, informed us that there were fa- 
vages on it. No doubt they chofe this place of 
refidence, becaufe it afforded them an opportu- 
nity of procuring filh with eafe among the fhoals. 

About three Quarters after ten we made the 
land of New-Zealand, which we approached by 
fleering eafterly, under favour of a light breeze 
from the wefl-north-wefl. 

The 



Makch.] of la perouse. 87 

The natives had kindled a large fire on the lof- 
tiefl of the hills that ikirt the fea, and which 
extend to Cape North. At half after five wc 
were a very little way from the Cape, when two 
canoes came off from the fhore, and paddled to- 
ward us. They foon came up with us, but re- 
mained fome time aftern of the fhip before they 
ventured alongfide. Judging rightly of our dif- 
pofition toward them, however, they approached 
with confidence ; aware, no doubt, that the Eu- 
ropeans, who had vifited them, had never beea 
the aggreiTors when any difpute arofe. They im- 
mediately fliowed us bundles of the New-Zea^ 
land fiax (pJiormmm tenaxj, fhaking them, in 
order that we might obferve all their beauty, and 
offering to barter with us. The ftufFs of dif- 
* ferent colours we gave them were received with 
marks of great fatisfatflion, and they always de- 
livered to us, with the mofl fcrupulous exadneis, 
the price on which we had agreed. 

Iron they decidedly preferred to every thing 
elfe that we offered them. This metal is {o va- 
luable in the eyes of thefe warlike people, that 
expreflions of the mofl lively joy burfl from 
them when they found we had fome. Though 
at firfl we Ihowed it them only at a diftance, 
they knew it perfed:ly well, from the found two 
pieces gave when flruck againft each other. 

In 



8S ' VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l/QS, 

In exchange for our articles, thcfe people gave 
us almoft every thing they had in their canoes ; 
and, which we confidered as a mark of the 
greatefl confidence, they made not the leaft dif- 
ficulty at difpofmg of all their weapons to us. 

The largeft of the fpears they gave us were 
not above five yards long, and an inch and half 
thick : the fmallefl were only half that length. 
They were all made of a fingle piece of very hard 
wood, which they had rendered perfedly fmooth. 

They gave us fifhing lines, and hooks of dif- 
ferent fliapes ; to the end of fome of which fea- 
thers were fattened, which they ufe as a bait for 
voracious filhes. Several of thefe lines were of 
great length, and had at the end a piece of hard 
ferpentine, to make them fink very deep in the 
water. We admired the fine polifh they had given 
this ftone, which was of a fpherical form, fur- 
mounted with a fmall protuberance, in which 
they had made a hole, to pafs a firing through. 
It muft be very difficult to thefe favages to bore a 
ftone of fuch hardnefs, and no doubt requires a 
great deal of time ; but they have much leifure 
for fuch employments, for their wants are few, 
and the fea fupplies them with food in abundance. 
They fold us a great deal of fifli, which they had 
jufl caught ; and there is fuch a quantity along 
the coafl, that, during the fliort time we lay to, 

we 



MaIICh] of la PEROITSE. 8^ 

wc. faw fevcral numerous flioals, which, rifing to 
the fiirface of the fca, agitated it for a confider- 
able fpace at different times, producing nearly 
the fame appearance as a current paffmg over a 
ihallow in calm weather. 

Thefe favages even ftripped themfelves of their 
clothes in order to barter with us. 

Some of the young men had drops at their 
ears, made' w4th a ferpentine of great hardnefs. 
They were cut of an oval figure, and for the moft 
part hear four inches long. 

The men of riper years wore, as a kind of tro-' 
phy^ a little piece of the large bone of the fore- 
arm of a man, which hung at the breaft by a 
little ftring that paffed round the neck. (See 
Plate XXV.) They fet a great value on this 
ornament. 

It is well known that thefe people are greedy 
devourers of human flefh ; and every thing that 
recals to their minds the idea of fuch food, feems 
to give them the greateft pleafure. A failor on 
board offered one of them a knife ; and, to fliew 
him the ufe of it, imitated the a<9:ion of cutting 
off one of his fingers, which he immediately car- 
ried to his mouth, and pretended to eat. The 
cannibal, who watched all his motions, expreffed 
great joy, laughing heartily for fome time, and 

Vol. IL G rubbing 



90 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l/QS- 

rubbing his hands. They were all very tall, and 
of a mufcular make. Soon alter fun-fct they 
left us. 

At the fame moment a third canoe arrived 
from the neareft fhore, with twelve of the ifland- 
ers in it, who immediately demanded hatchets 
in exchange for their goods. One of them had 
already obtained a hatchet, when another ad- 
drefl'ed himfelf to us in a rough voice, bawling 
out with all his ftrength etohi (a hatchet), and 
was not filent till he h-ad obtained one. 

It was now night, and the Efperance was {o 
far diilant as to be out of fight ; accordingly wc 
let off a few fmall quantities of powder, to induce 
her to make known to us her fituation : but wc 
obferved witli furprife, that the natives, far from 
difplaying any dread of the effects of gunpowder, 
continued their barter neverthelefs. It had been, 
dark for more than an hour, when they paddled 
away to the Ihore. 

As we lay to, we hove the lead feveral tim.cs, 
and always found a bottom of fine fand, and ffoni 
thirty-fix to fifty fathoms water. 

24th. The faint breeze that fet off from the 
land during the night, was fucceeded toward day- 
break by a north-weft wind. Wc were ftill very 
near the coaft, and we might cafily have come to 

an 



MARCH.] OP LA PEROUSE. ^iT 

an anchor in Lauriflon Bay, but the fatal difaflers 
that befell Captain Marion, and afterwards Fur- 
neaux, made the General rpfolve to pafs on. 

I thought it my duty, however, to reprefent to 
him, how important an objed: it waS;» to procure 
from New Zealand the liliaceous plant known 
by the name oi pliorm'mm tenax, or New Zealand 
flax, in order to convey it to Europe, w^here it 
would thrive in perfe6lion. The fibres obtained 
from the leaves of this plant are much fuperior in 
ftrength to any other vegetable production em- 
ployed for making ropes, and cables made of it 
would bear the greateftftrain. No one could be 
more fenfible of all the benefits our navy might 
derive from this plant, than the Commander in 
Chief of our expedition ; yet we held on our 
courfe for the Friendly Illands, continuing to 
fleer north-eaft. 

There would have been this advantage, like- 
wife, in flopping at the northern extremity of 
New Zealand, that it would have afforded us an 
opportunity of verifying our obfervations, which 
led us to place Cape North 30^ more to the eaft- 
ward than it is laid down by Wales. It will 
be granted, howxver, that we have fufficient 
, reafon to give our obfervations the preference, 
when it is confidered, that the Englifli aftro- 
nomer determined the fituatioii of this point only 

Q2 



Q2 VOYAGE IN SEARCtf [l7Q3. 

from the longitude obferved in Ship Cove, and 
the diftance run along the coafi: by Captain Cook : 
and it mufl be remembered, that thlsf:e}cbratcd 
navigator had no timc-kccper on board during 
his firft voyage, an inftrument indifpenfably ne- 
ceflary to afccrtain with precifion the diftancc 
run upon a coaft, where the currents arc Aery 
rapid and irregular. 

. 17th. About four in the afternoon, the man at 
the mail-head called out, that he had fight of a 
large rock to the north-north-caft ; and we were 
foon furrounded by a great number of fea-fowl, 
among which we noticed many boobies and 
gulls. It was night when we pafled about fix 
hundred yards to leeward of this Iboal, from 
which w'e heard the fcrcams of feveral of thefe 
birds ; and by the favour of a fine moon-light 
night, we diftinguiflied on the moll prominent 
points a whitenefs, which we afcribed to their 
excrement. 

This rock, which is in latitude 31° 33' 20" 
fouth;, longitude 1/9° caft, is not much above 
half a mile in circumference, and feventy or 
eighty yards high. Toward its weft end fome 
reefs were obferved. 

As wc paiTed to leeward of this Ihoal, we were 
in completely fmooth water, fo that if there had 
been any fLmkcn rock in our courfe, wx flaould 

not 



March.] "of la perouse. 93 

not have been informed of our danger till the 
veflel ftruck upon it. If we had doubled the rock 
to windward, or even to leeward at a proper 
difiiance, we fhould not have run this rifk. 

18th. Next morning at day-break w^e made 
Curtis's Illands. Thcfe are two very fmall ifles, 
near four laigues diftant from each other. The 
fouthernmoft is about a mile long only from north 
to fouth, fteep, very bare, and interfperfed with 
a great number of rocks, the fummits of the 
higheft of which reach about a hundred yards 
above the level of the fea. Their whitilh colour 
led me to prefume, that they were of a calcareous 
nature, like mofl; of the iflands found in thele 
feas. 

The other ifland is tolerably rounded, covered 
with verdure, and as high as the former. Its fides 
are fleep ai mofl: every where, yet you may land 
i^on it toward the weft. It is in the latitude of 
30'' ] 8'' 26" fouth, longitude !;(/ 38'' eaft. 

About fixf^in the evening w^e perceived at a 
s^reat diftance to the north-north-weft, a new 
ifland, which induced us to lay to all night. 

IQth. The next morning, when day broke,' 
we had fight of the fame ifland toward the north, 
and ftill upwards df ten leagues diftance ; but 
about five in the afternoon w^e were clofe in with 
it, "and had already fcen the whole of its circum- 

G 3 ference. 



g4 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [1/93. 

ference, the extent of which might be about three 
leagues. 

To this ifland, the latitude of which is 29'' 20^ 
18" fouth, longitude 179° 55' eafl, we gave the 
name of Recherche. Its figure is nearly trian- 
gular. Toward the middle the land rifes to the 
height of about five hundred yards above the 
level of the fea. On the eaft the earth had 
crumbled down in a few places of no great ex- 
tent, where a boat might land. 

In all the perpendicular cliffs we could clearly 
diflinguifh the arrangement of the thin, parallel, 
and horizontal ilrata of a whitifli, and no doubt 
calcareous flone, of which the ifland is formed. 
In the interior part of the ifland we faw con- 
fiderable precipices, and there were trees to the 
very fummit of the highefl places. 

There is a fhoal almoft clofc to the fliore on 
.the north-wefl, which extends at leaft fix hundred 
yards in that dire6lion. 

Eight rocks, a few hundred yards diftant from 
each other, ftretch out into the fea for the fpace 
of a league to the eafl-fouth-eafl. 

Between the weft and north -wcfl points, wc 
obferved a fmall bight, where probably very good 
ground would be found, and which affords com- 
plete fhelter from the eafl erly winds. 

Between the, riorth-wcfl and fouth-eafl: poii:^t^s 

we 



March.] of -la perouse. q5 

we faw a little rivulet, which runs into the fea ; 
and at a little diftance from it, in a perpendi- 
cular cliff, we obferved a large patch of earth, of 
a tolerably deep red colour, perhaps a fort of clay, 
which appeared incrufted by the calcareous flone. 

On the 23d, about nine in the evening, we- 
entered the Torrid Zone, in the longitude o,i 
184° eaft. This was the fourth time of our paf- 
fmg the Tropic of Capricorn. 

24th. The next day, at one o'clock in the 
afternoon, we made Eooa, one of the Friendly 
Iflands, bearing from us north-weft, diftant about 
fourteen leagues ; and it was not long before we 
had a pretty near view of it. The beautiful ver- 
dure with which it was every where covered, 
proclaimed the fertility of the foil. The land is 
of a moderate height. 

It was half after fix when we brought to, to 
wait for the Efperance, and we fpent the night , 
; in plying to windward. / 

On the 25th, at feven o'clock in the morn^/ 
ti ing, we were about fix' leagues only from Ton-* 
gataboo, and yet we could not cafily diftinguifll 
it, becaufe the land is fo low. We foon got 
pretty near in with the eaftern coaft, {landing 
towa,rd the north and north-weft, that we might 
not mifs the opening that leads to the harbour, 
which is to be entered only by palling between 

G 4 fom 1^ 



^G VOYAGE IN SJtARrii [iTO^. 

ibmc reefs, which arc lo clofc together that the 
break between them is not to be diflinguiflicd at 
a httle diilancc. 

As foon as we were about the middle of this 
channel, feveral ca^iocs with out-riggers came 
to meet us, laden with fruit, hogs, and poul- 
try, which they offered us. Each had two or 
three natives on board, fcldoni four. One of 
them coming toward us with too much fpecd, 
her dut-rigger gave way, and we had the forrow 
to lee the three rowers fall into the water. They 
feemed lefs difconcerted, however, than we fliould 
have imagined, and fwam to the neareft fliore, 
dragging with them their canoe, which was foon 
fet afioat again. Thcfe canoes are fo flight that 
they muft frequently be expofed to fuch acci- 
dents ; and, indeed, their countrymen, who pafled 
clofe by, feemed fcarcely to notice it. 

All thefe canoes had eatables en board, one 
excepted, in which we obferved none, and which, 
therefore, we imagined, had nothing to offer us. 
But wc were miftaken : it was navigated by two 
men, whofe countenances expreiTed much gaiety, 
while they pointed out to us two women, who 
were paddling with them ; and the figns they 
made left us no room to doubt, that they were 
making us very gallant propofals. 

At a diftance we faw fome large failing canoes. 

About 



Mabch.] of la perouse. 97 

About half after eleven, being in the narrowed 
part of the channel, where it did not appear to 
us to be above four hundred ■ yards over, we 
had bottom near the middle at fix fathoms. 

Juft as we were on the point of entering into 
it, a large canoe came to meet us, and the people 
in her invited us to follow them in a inuch wider 
channel, which was on the larboard of it ; but 
when they faw us take another courfe, they re- 
turned, and continued fome time a-head of us» 
willing to inftrutl us how to fteer. 

At length we reached the road of Tongataboo, 
and after making feveral tacks to fetch the an- 
chorage, brought up a mile to the fouth-weft of 
Pangaimotoo, in eleven fathoms and a half of 
water, on a bottom of veiy fine grey fand. 

One of the weflern points of Tongataboo bore 
weft 3° north ; the weftern extremity of Panga'i- 
matoo, north 24'' eafl: ; and the extremity of the 
reefs on that fide, north 20° weft. 

We were immediately furrounded by the na- 
tives, who came on board in fuch numbers, that 
the deck was foon covered w ith them. Several 
came in double canoes, of the ihape reprefented 
in Plate XXVIII. 

One of thefe people, followed by feveral others, 
who appeared to pay him great refped:, announced 
himfeif as one of the chiefs of the ifland. He 

de fired 



08 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l703. 

dcfircd to fee the Commander of the vcflel, and 
immediately ordered a hog to be brought, of 
which he made him a prefent. This perfon cx- 
preiTed much gratitude on receiving a hatchet 
from the General's own hands. 

In lefs than an hour we procured, by way of 
barter, a doz,en hogs, the fmalleft of vn hich was 
at Icaft a hundred weight. For each a hatchet, 
of a middling fize, was given. 
. The General had given orders to one of his 
officers to treat with the iflanders for what pro- 
vifion they could fumifli ; and to prevent all 
competition, which might have been injurious to 
the fupply of our fliips, he had forbidden every 
other perfon to make any exchange. But it was 
impoffible to' fee thcfe orders executed to the let- 
ter ; and it was difficult to refift the eagernefs of 
the natives to difpofc of their wares, which each 
endeavoured to difplay to the befl; advantage. 
We were much amufcd to fee them holding their 
little pigs under their arms, and every now and 
then pulling them by the ears to make them 
iqueal, that we might know they had them to 
fell. 

A chief of the warriors, named Feenou, came 
on board about five in the afternoon. He was 
a man about forty-h\e years of age, of a mid- 
dling ftature, and very fat. Like the reft of the 

natives 







'21 
J 

V 






March.] of la perouse. pg 

natives, he had altogether the features of an Eu- 
ropean. His body was covered with fears in va- 
rious places, and he pointed out to us^two on the 
breaft, which, he faid, were from wounds received 
by fpcars in different battles againfl the people 
of Feejee. 

The portrait of this warrior, Plate VIII. Fig. 
.2, is a very faithful refemblance. His hair, pow- 
dered with lime, was drcffed in fuch a way, 
that he might be fuppofed to have worn a wig. 

He fcated himfelf on the bench on the quarter- 
deck, with four of the natives, and ordered all 
the reft to fquat down : fome of them, however, 
he permitted to fit on the arm-cheft. I know 
not whether thefe were great perfonages ; but we 
remarked among them a man advanced in years, 
accompanied by a young girl, who employed all 
his eloquence to tempt fuch of us as came near 
her. 

Feenou made a prefent to the General of the 
largeft hog that we had yet feen fmce we had 
been at anchor. He gave him likevvife two very 
■ fine clubs, made of cafuarhia wood, inlaid with 
plates of bone, fome cut round, others in fears, 
and others in the fliape of birds, of which, how- 
ever, they were but poor referablances. This 
chief appeared well fatisfied when the General 
•gave him a hatchet, a large piece of red fluff, and 
^ few nails. To tcflify his gratitude, he took 
^ each 



100 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [iTOS. 

each of thefc articles in his left hand, and touched 
the left iidc of his forehead with it. 

Towards fun-fet we requcfled him to fend out 
of the fhip all the natives, the crowd of whom 
Was become immenfe. We were defirous that 
not one fliould remain, as we did not wifh to 
have the trouble of watching them during the 
night : but perhaps his authority did not extend 
to them all ; for^ after he had driven aw^ay the 
greatell: part only, he left us, and returned to- 
wards the weftern fliore of Tongataboo. 

The ilep he took to rid our fliip of thefe ifland- 
ers, by w:'hom we were incommoded to an cx- 
ccffive degree, could not eafily be gueil'ed. He 
drove them out with his club, w hich he handled 
fo vigoroufly, that they had no way to efcape the 
rude blows of this weapon, but by leaping into 
the fca. 

Almoft all their clubs are made with the wood 
of the caftiarhia, which is extremely hard ; yet we 
faw a few of bone, fomewhat more than a yard 
long. As thefe iflanders have no quadruped ca- 
pable of furnifliing a bone of fuch length, there 
can be no doubt but it muft belong to fome large 
animal of the whale genus. 

Befide many fowls, they fold us pigeons of 
the fpecies called columba aenea (nutmeg pigeon), 
bread-fruit, cocoa-nuts, yams, and feveral va- 
rieties of plaintain, of a delicious flavour. 

We 



March.] of la perotjse. I6r 

We dcfired all the natives to jro afhore before 
night, tor feveral had not come for the purpofe 
of fatisfying their curiofity merely, or ielUng us 
their goods ; as we foon difcovered that they had 
ftolen feveral articles from us. All the canoes, 
however, were gone, and there were ilill iix of 
the iflanders left on board ; w ho, having no 
means of getting on fhore but by fwimming, 
rcqueftcd us to let them pals the night upon 
deck, one excepted, who chofe rather to fwim. 
ailiore, though we were a mile from the nearcft 
land. We admired the facility with which he 
executed all his movements. He fwam con- 
ftantly on the belly, his neck being entirely out 
of water, and making very fliort ftrokes with his 
left hand, which he kept conllantly before him, 
while he gave a great fpread to his right hand, 
w^hich he carried to the thigh on the fame fide at 
every ftrokc. The body was at the fame time a 
little inclined to the left, which increaied the 
rapidity, with which it cut the water. I never 
faw an European fwim with fuch confidence, or 
with fuch fpeed*. 

* A fomewhat fimilar mode of fwimming, I believe, is 
not unfrequent among expert fvvimmers ia England ; at 
leaft I have often feen il pra(^i(ed by others, and have had 
recourfe to it myfelf; v.hen engaged in a contelt of fpeed — 
Tranjlator, 

20th. 



102 VOYAGE IN SEAHCir [l793. 

26th. Feenou returned the next morning, and 
fpcnt a few hours on board. He was fingularly 
amufed by an ape belonging to one of our gun- 
ners, to the flighteft actions of which he was at- 
tentive. 

The tents of the obfervatory were pitched on 
the fouth-weft Jhore of Pangaimatoo, and to the 
fame place were conveyed ftuffs of different c©- 
lours, with a great many articles of hardware, to 
exchange for frefh provifion. As the inhabitants 
brought us a great many hogs, the General re- 
folved to make an addition to our fait flores ; and 
Citizen Renard, one of our furg€ons, offered to 
fuperintend the falting in of the pork. 

An enclofure was marked out by a rope, faf- 
tencd to the ends of fome ftakes, which were 
ffuck into the ground at four or five yards dif- 
tance from each other. This barrier was intended 
to keep out the natives, ,^ay and night, above two 
thoufand of whom, moft of them from Tonga- 
taboo, w^ere already gathered round us. 

Futtafaihc, one of the fons of the late King 
Poulaho, repaired early to the fame place. He 
took upon himfelf to preferve order among the 
natives ; and accordingly our trade was carried on 
with the grcatcft peaceablencfs : but we faw with 
regret that, to make himifelf obeyed, he em- 
ployed means as barbarous with refpcdl to them, 

as 



March.] of la perouse. • i<73 

as laborious to himfelf; or if any one of them 
dared to pafs the enclofure that was traced out, 
by a few hand's-breadths only, he immediately 
threw at him the firft thing that came to hand, 
as a warning for him to retire, without paying 
any regard to the injury that might be done by 
it. A young man, who advanced a little too far, 
had nearly loft his life by his inattention to the 
orders of Futtafaihc, whp immediately threw at 
him with violence a large log of wood, but he was 
fortunate enough to avoid the biow\ 

Wc were obliged to crofs this numerous circle 
to penetrate into the interior part of the ifland ; 
and it w^as not eafy to avoid treading on the feet 
or legs of the natives, w^ho fat on the ground very 
clofe together, all with their legs acrofs ; yet, far 
from being angry, they held out their hands to 
affift us when, for fear of hurting them, we knew 
not w^here to fct our feet. A few of them fol- 
lowed us. 

We found many of the people employed in 
conftrufting huts, in order to remain on the ifland 
of Pangaimotoo ; whither they were attracted by 
our making choice of this little ifland as a market 
place for the provifion, with which they could 
fupply us. Several of thefe huts were already 
finilhed. The iflanders, whom we met with in 

them, 



104 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [iTQS' 

them, received us with various teftimonies of 
great affed:ion. 

The ground occupied by each of "thcfe habita- 
tions was not, in general, above fixtcen feet long, 
and ten feet wide. The roof, about fix feet and 
a half high in the middle, flppcd down to the 
ground. In one of its fides an opening was made, 
ibmetimes the whole length of the hut, but fo 
low, that there was no entering, without ftoop- 
ing fo much, as to be obliged to creep on ali 
fours. On the oppofite fide we obfer\T.d another 
opening, ilill lower and narrower, which feemed 
intended to promote the circulation of air. In 
others a greater number of openings were feen, 
but fmaller, and made even in the ends of the 
huts. We admired the fmc texture of the mats, 
which were fpread upon the ground. The roofs 
were covered with the leaves of the cocoa-tree, 
or of the mountain palm (corypha nmhrandiferajy 
fometimes too with grafs or rulhes. L' nder fuch 
a roof there is no ftanding, except in the middle ; 
but thefe people commonly fquat on the ground, 
fo that they can fit tolerably near to tlie fides. 

In the neighbourhood of thefe tranquil dwell- 
ings we frequently met with very obliging though 
frout men, who took care to inform flrangers of 
the favourable reception they might meet with 

from 



March.] of la perouse. joi> 

from the fair-fcx in thefe fortunate lllands. Their 
offers, no doubt, were in fome meafure owing to 
their wilh to oblige ; but it appeared that they 
had an eye to their own intereft at the fame 
time, as they never forgot to afk fome recom- 
penfe in return for their information. 

We w^alked fome time along the borders of the 
ihore, on which we faw a great number of bread- 
fruit trees in full vigour, though their roots were 
bathed with brackifli water. But foon the water 
rifing with the flood-tide, obliged us to go farther 
within the land, where we traverfed thick woods, 
in the ihadc of which grew the tacca pinnattfida, 
Jaccharum Jpofitanenm, nnijfcendd frondofa, abrus 
precatorius (Jamaica wild liquorice), the fpecies 
of pepper tree which they life for making kavai 
&c. We then walked over grounds employed 
partly in" the culture of the fweet potatoe, partly 
in that of the fpecies of yam called diofcorea alata ; 
we faw% too, young plants of vacoua, or pandamis 
fidoraujjima (fweet fccntcd fcrew-pine), the leaves 
of which are uled for making mats. Farther 
on w^e found plantations of the paper mulberry 
tree, cultivated for the fake of its bark, of which 
they fabricate Huff for garments. The hiblfcus 
ttUaceus grew^ Ipontaneoufly on the borders of thefe 
cultivated fpots, and clofe by the fea. Its bark 
likewife furnlllies them with materials for making 

Vol. 11. li a kind' 



106 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l/QS, 

a kind of fluff, but much inferior in beauty to 
that of the paper mulberry tree. 

Some of the natives, who followed us very 
clofe, affec^led the appearance of having no other 
defign, but that of being ufeful to us : yet we 
caught fome of them now and then putting their 
hands into our pockets, to fteal what they could 
jfind ; and when we difcovered them, we always 
obliged them to return what they had taken. 
One of them, however, having feized a knife, 
that belonged to one of the crew, took to his 
heels with all fpeed, and difappeared amid the 
wood. 

It w^as not long before wc fell in with a com- 
pany of the illanders, who were preparing to drink 
lava. They invited us to fit down by them, and 
we remained all the time they were preparing 
their beverage. They give the fame name to the 
fpecies of pepper tree, which conftitutes its chief 
ingredient, and the long, flefhy, and very tender 
roots of which are often more than four inches 
thick. Thefe they firft cleaned with the greatefl 
care. They then chewed them, fo as to reduce 
them to a kind of pafte, of which they formed 
balls, nearly four inches in circumference. As faft 
as thefe balls were" made, they were put into a 
large wooden veffcl ; and when the bottom was 
coA'Cred with them, Handing about four inches 

diftant 



March.] of la perouse'. 107 

diftant from each other, they filled up the veiTel 
with water. The liquor was then Ihaken, and 
ferved out in cups to all the guefts. Some drank 
out of cocoa-nut ihells, others made themfelves 
cups on the occafion from the leaves of the ^plan- 
tain tree. 

The large roots, with which the kava was 
made, had, in the direction of their length, very 
flcndcr woody fibres, which fubfided to the bot- 
tom of the liquor. Thefe fibres, the perfon who 
ferved it out, coUecfted in one of his hands, and 
ufed as a fponge, to fill the cups. 

We were invited to take a fhare of this be- 
verage ; but our feeing it prepared was fufficient 
to make us decline the civil offer. The chaplain 
of our fliip, however, had the courage to fwallow 
a bumper of it. For my part, as I was defirous 
alfo of tafling the flavour of the root, I preferred 
chewing a bit of it myfelf, and found it acrid and 
flimulant. Each of the company afterwards ate 
fome yams, frefh roafled under the embers, and 
plaintains; no doubt to take off the heat, which 
the ftomach mufl feel from this intoxicating li- 
quor. 

Thefe people fet much flore by the pepper 
tree, from which they procure it. Its ftalk, fre- 
quently bigger than the thumb, is tolerably 
ftraight, and requires no fupport. They cut off 

H 2 feveral 



108 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l793. 

feveral pieces in the fpaccs between the knots, 
and made us a prcfcnt of them, informing us, 
that they fct them thus in the ground, in order to 
•propagate the plant. 

We were not far from the tents of the obfer- 
vatory, when fome others of the natives invited 
us to eat fruit, among which we had the pleaiurc 
of feeing that of tho, fpondias cytherea (pommes de 
cy the re J. Every one fat down : Citizen Riche 
juft laid down a pole-axe, when a native crept 
flily behind him, took it up, and ran off as fall:~ 
as he could. We immediately purfucd him, but 
he had too far the ftart for us to come up wdth 
him. A chief, who was then near us, would 
make the thief reftore the pole-axe, and ran after 
him likewife ; but he foon returned, and appeared 
very forry, that he could not overtake the fugi- 
tive. 

We foon arrived within the enclofure where 
the traffic was carried on. Futtafaihe was fhill 
there. We wxre informed that he had caufcd a 
fabre, and feveral other things belonging to dif- 
ferent perfons of the crew, which had been 
flolen by the natives, to be returned. Riche ac- 
cordingly applied to him, in order to procure his 
pole-axe again ; but the inquiries of Futtafaihe 
were to no purpofe. 

27th. A great many canoes furrounded our 

Ihips, 



March.] of la perouse. log 

/hips, though the General had given orders to 
. oblige them to keep off; but they difpofed of their 
merchandize to better advantage here, than at 
the market on ihore : for there little was fold but 
eatables, the price of w^hich w^as fixed ; while on 
board they frequently received a high price for 
objed:s of fancy. Befidcs, thefe canoes carried on 
another fort of trade, ftill more rigoroufly prohi- 
bited by the orders of General Dentrecafteaux : 
but the fentries not being very flricfl in this point, 
many young girls eafily evaded their notice, and 
were creeping in at the port-holes every moment. 

We went afhore very early at the neareft place, 
where we had the pleafure to fee that thele 
iflanders were in poiTeffion of the fugar-cane. 
They offered us fome very large ones, which we 
accepted. They fold us feveral birds, and among 
others a beautiful fpecies of lory, which they in- 
formed us had been brought to them from Feejee ; 
a fine fpecies of dove, remarkable tor a red fpot 
on the head, and known by the name oi cohmtha 
piirpurata ; the Philippine rail, rallus phiVippenJis ; 
the pigeon called coluviha paclfica, &c. Several 
had the lizard known by the appellation of lacerta 
amho'metiJiSf which they offered us as very good to 
eat. 

The natives, who followed us, were very trou- 
.blefome to us by their number, and even by their 

H 3 eagcrneis 



110 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l^QS. 

cagernefs to oblige us. Seeing us colle6l plants, 
feveral pulled up indifcriminately all they found, 
made them up into large bundles, brought them 
to us, and then wanted to load us with them. 
Others, obferving us colled: infects, were incef- 
fantly afking whether they were not to feed the 
birds we had juft purchafed. But moft put on 
a femblance of having the greateft afFediion for 
us, while they were purloining our things. Se- 
veral times we endeavoured in vain to get rid of 
them, the methods we took being unquellionably 
too mild, for people accuftomed to be treated fo 
roughly by their chiefs. 

Futtafaihe, accompanied by another chief, had 
been to dine with the General, who prefented 
one with a fcarlet fuit of clothes, the other with 
a blue. Adorned with this new drefs, which they 
had put on over their own clothes, they were in 
one of the tents of ther obfervatory, when Feenou 
made his appearance at the entrance of it, and 
difplayed great jealoul)' at feeing them thus equip- 
ped. He retired with an air of great difcontent, 
faying, that every body pafTed themfelves off for 
chiefs fegu'tj, and went to drink kava with fome 
others. We did not know what to think of 
Feenou's precipitate retreat ; but we prefumed; 
that he was lefs powerful than Futtafaihe, and 
declined appearing before him, that he might not 

bQ 



March.] of la perouse. ill 

be under the neceffity of paying him the honours 
due to his rank. 

The officer cntrufted with the purchafe of pro- 
vifion had a very laborious taili to fulfil : for, 
though he had fixed a regular value on every 
article, the natives, ftill in hopes of felling them 
dearer, never parted with their goods till they had 
dilputed a long time about their price. 

Preffed by hunger, we retired into the tent, 
where the pro vifion purchafed in the courfe of 
the day was depofited ; and were followed by two 
natives, whom wx took for chiefs. One of them 
fliewed the greateft eagernefs tp fele6l for me 
the choicefl fruit: I had laid my hat on the 
ground, thinking it a place of fecurity ; but thefe 
two thieves were not inattentive to their trade; 
he that was behind me was adroit enough, to 
hide my hat under his clothes, and went away, 
without my perceiving it ; and the other quickly 
followed him. I was the lefs apprehenfive of fuch 
^a trick, as I did not fuppofe that they would have 
ventured upon an article of fuch bulk, at the rifk 
of being caught within the cnclofure, into which 
we had permitted them to enter : bcfides, a hat 
could be of very little ufe to people who com- 
monly go bare-headed. The addrefs they dif- 
played in robbing me, convinced us that it was 
not their firft attempt ; and led us to prefiime, 

H 4 that 



112 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l7Q3. 

that they frequently rob one another. The chiefs, 
too, might have fome intereft in theHihefts com' 
mitted on us ; for we frequently faw them fcize 
what they found in the hands of their fubje(5ls, 
whom they plundered very openly. 

We were extremely unwilling to proceed to 
extremities with thefe knaves ; but it was high 
time to check their boldnefs, which impunity 
ferved only to encourage. With this view, we 
propofed to let them fee the effed; of our fire-arms 
on a cock, which we tied to the end of a long 
pole. But the perfon, who fired at it, was fo in- 
cautious, as to take a double-barrelled gun, which 
had been expofed to the dampnefs of the air all 
the preceding night ; in confequence of which, 
the firft time it flafhed in the pan, the next it 
hung fire ; fo that he was obliged to take another 
piece to bring down the cock. Accordingly the 
natives appeared to retain a much higher idea of 
their weapons than of ours, when one of them, 
with a long arrow, furnifhed with three diverging 
points, Ihot another cock^ fixed at the end of the 
fame pole. In order to take aim at the bird, 
having placed himfclf juft under it, he raifed 
hinifelf as high as he could ori tiptoe, fo that the 
point of his arrow was not above four yards from 
the cock. All the reft had their eyes fixed upon 
him, and kept the moft profound filence ; but the 

moment 



March.] of la perouse. 113 

moment he hit the objecfl, their fhouts of admi- 
ration gave us to underftand that they did not in 
general lucceed fo well,' even at fo fliort a dif- 
tance. 

The arrow, ufed upon this occafion was near 
three yards long ; but they have others of inferior 
dimenfions, which they likewife carry in quivers 
of bamboo. 

28th. Twofentries kept guard day and night at 
the poft we had eftablillied on the Mand of Pan- 
gaimotoo, who were fufficient to keep off fuch of 
the natives as might endeavour to fteal into it 
fecretly, to carry off the articles we had depofited 
there. Undoubtedly no apprehenfions had been 
entertained, that they would break into it by 
force, for no precautions had been taken to guard 
againft an affault. A native, however, took ad- 
vantage of a heavy fall of rain, which came on 
juft as day was breaking, to get behind one of our 
Jbntries, and gave him fuch a violent ffroke on 
the head with his club, that he knocked him 
down, though his helmet-cap warded off much 
of the violence of the blow. The alTaffin imme- 
diately made off with his mufliet ; and the other 
fentry inlliantly gave notice of it to thofe of us, 
who were lleepiiig in the tents. The alarm was 
great, and feveral moved nearer to the fliore, that 
they might be able to reach the loiig-boat, if the 

iflanders 



114 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [iTQ^. 

i/landers fhould fall upon us in great number. 
The cry of alarm was heard on board the Efpe- 
rance, that fhip having come within hail of the 
ihore the preceding evening, and immediately a 
few mufkets were lired from her, to give notice 
of it to the Recherche : but our fear of a general 
attack from the natives did not continue long, for 
w^e quickly aflured ourfelves, that moft of them 
were ftill faft afleep round our poft, and thofe, 
W'ho had been awakened, had fled. An officer, 
too, who arrived from the interior of the ifland, 
almoft at the inftant of the affaffination, reported, 
that he had feen a great many of the natives, all 
of whom appeared to him to be in a profound 
fleep. 

The Commander of our expedition went on 
fliore about fix o'clock, with a detachment well 
armed, and gave orders to flrike the tents im- 
mediately, and carry them aboard, with every 
thing that; had been left at the poft for the pur- 
pofe of barter. 

Our removal much grieved feveral of the chiefs, 
who came to the General to exprefs the fbrrow 
they felt at this difagreeable affair. - They loudly 
exprefled their difapprobation of this cowardly 
piece of treachery, faying, that the culprit de- 
ferved death, and Ihould not long efcape the due 
reward of his crime. At the fame time they did 

every 



March.] of la perouse. 115 

every thing in their power to prevail on us to 
continue our barter as before. 

Our detachment having advanced a Httle way 
into the ifland, to examine the difpofition of the 
natives, found near a thoufand, who had ilept in 
the neighbourhood of our poft; and requefted 
them to remove to a greater diftance ; which 
they all did, except a fmall party of armed men, 
who, lifting up their clubs and fpears, refufed 
to retire a fmgle Hep. Perhaps it would have 
been proper to have puniflied their audacity, 
which led us to confider them as accompUces of 
the aflaffin : but a chief, named Toohoii, one of 
the king's relations, fell upon them with fury, 
and quickly difperfed them by heavy blows with 
his club. 

The General, before he got into the boat to 
return on board, made a few prefents to the dif- 
ferent chiefs, who were coUedied around him. 
He alfo required them to deliver up the affaffin, 
and return the mufket he had ftolcn, with the 
fabre that had been taken from our gunner the 
day before ; informing them, that he would allow 
the barter to be renewed on thefe conditions 
alone. 

All the natives retired when our long boat put 
off from the fliore ; but as foon as it arrived along- 
side the veffel, feveral of them went to the fpot 

we 



llff VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l 793. 

we had quitted, and examined it very carefully, 
to fee whether we had not left fomething or 
other behind us. We obferved one, who had the 
dexterity to pull out the nail by which one of our 
clocks had been hung up to a poft'. 

Feenou came on board in the afternoon, and 
made the General a prcfent of fome bread-fruit, 
yams, plantains, and a pig. In return he re- 
ceived a faw, a hatchet, and feveral chifcls : but 
we perceived, that he gave the hatchet a decided 
preference to the other tools. After having paid 
the greateft attention to the account wx gave 
him of the attack made on our fentry by one of 
the natives, he promifed to return the mufket 
the next day ; and told us, that he would bring 
the aiTaflm to us, and dojuftice on him in our 
prefence. He defired to fee the gunner, who 
had received a large wound in the head, but hap- 
pily not dangerous, as the helmet-cap he wore 
had deadened the blow. Feenou difplayed much 
fenfibility on feeing the wound, and prefented 
the gunner with a piece of the ftuff fabricated of 
the bark of the paper mulberry tree, to ufe in 
dreffmg the wound. In fa<^ the properties of 
this ftuff render it well adapted to fuch a pur- 
pofe. 

Feenou having ordered feveral of the natives, 
who attended him, to make kava, thefe immedi- 
ately 



March.] of la perouse. I17 

ately began to chew fbme large roots of the fpe- 
cies of pepper tree, to which they give that name, 
and the liquor was foon prepared. He drank of 
it firft, and the reft was iliared among the other 
natives, who, as well as Fcenou, ate plantains 
after it. Out of refpeA to him, they all fquattcd 
on the deck, while he fat on the watch bench. 

We ihowed this chief fcveral ensrravins-s in the 
voyages of Captain Cook. It was with the ^ 
greateft refped: that he feveral times pronounced 
the name of that celebrated navigator, "which he 
called Toote. It is remarkable, that though we 
could pronounce words of their language with 
great facility, they could not do fo with ours : for 
inilance, when they wiflied to pronounce the 
word Fra?ifois, they faid Palmtfois ; inftead of 
BeauprS, they faid Beaupele, &:c. Feenou talked 
to us of Otaheite, and faid, that he had iecn Omai 
at Anamooka. Perhaps this is the fame Feenou 
who was particularly intimate with Cook in his 
laft voyage, though that navigator fays he was a 
tall man. 

His attendants faid a great deal to us "about 
King Toobou, of whofe power tiiey made great 
boaft ; and to point out to us his fuperiority, they 
raifed the right arm very high^ pronouncing his 
name at the fame time, and then touched it near 
the elbow with the left hand^ to mark the inferi- 
ority 



118 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l79^. 

orlty of Feenou. He himfelf afTented to this pre- 
eminence of Toobou, who, he faid, was to be on 
board us the next day. 

29th. I had intended to fpend this day on the 
ifland of Tongataboo, w ith fome of my fhipmates ; 
but the General dcfired us to poftpone this ex- 
curfion, till the chiefs had given u& a proof, that 
they were really determined to put an end to the 
depredations committed by their fubje6ts. 

Several canoes furrounded our vefTcls, but no 
one was permitted to come alongside. Many of 
their people, weary of their fituation, as they 
couid not carry on any kind of traffic, amufed 
themfeh es with fifliing. Their nets were nearly 
nine' yards long, about a yard and a half deep, and 
the mcfiies were about an inch fquare. From 
the fliape of thefc nets, feveral of which we had 
already purchafed, we imagined that they'ufed 
them as v/e do feines, hauling them up on the 
beach ; but we were much aftoniflied to fee them 
throw them out in the open road, much in the 
fame manner as w^e do a cafting-net. On the 
lowxr fide were faftened pieces of coral, which 
funk the net rapidly to the bottom ; and the 
fifhermen immediately dived, to bring the tw^o 
ends together by means of fmall lines faftened 
to them ; thus enclofmg the lilh, which they put 
into their canoes. It is obvious that filh muft be 

very 



March.] of la perouse. ug 

very plenty, for them to be caught in this man- 
ner in the open fea. No doubt the fifliermen 
would not have taken all this trouble, had not 
their hunger been extremely craving ; for, as 
they had no means of dreffing their fifli in their 
canoes, they did not hefitate to devour it raw. 

About nine in the morning three chiefs came 
on board, to acquaint us that Toobou, the fu- 
preme chief fcgui Idi) of Tongataboo, Vavao, 
Anamooka, &c. was coming to pay us a vifit, 
and that he would deliver into our hands the 
aflaffin we demanded, and reftore the mufket 
that had been ftolen. In fa6t, it was fcarcely 
eleven o'clock when Toobou arrived, with feveral 
chiefs. The aiTaffin wTtS at his feet, lying on his 
belly with his hands bound behind his back. He 
ordered him on board immediately, and then di- 
rected the mufket, w^ith its bayonet fixed, which 
had been taken from one of our fentries, to be 
brought. Two pieces of ftufF, made of the bark 
of the paper mulberry, fo large, that each, if 
fpread out, w^ould have completely covered our 
veiTel, two hogs, and feveral very large mats, 
compofed the prefent w^hich he brought to the 
Commander of our expedition. The v/arrior 
Feenou, not difdaining to perform the office of 
executioner, lifted up his club, to beat out the 
brains of the culprit, and it was fomewhat diffi- 
cult 



120 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l793* 

cult to prevent him from doing juflice on tlid . 
prifoner before our eyes. At length, however, he 
delivered him into the hands of the General, 
imagining, no doubt, that he w^as defirous of 
keeping him, to infiiA on him himfelf the pu- 
nifhment due to his crime. The prifoner too, 
flippofing that his laft hour was come, already 
ftretched out his neck, when our {entry, w^hom 
.he had knocked down, begged the life of the of- 
fender. On this he was difmiffed, with a few 
ftripes on the back with a rope's end : but Fee- 
nou, thinking this punitliment far too little, again 
raifed his club, to put an end to his exiftence.- 
The General bawled out as loud as he could, ka'i 
mate, (that he ihould grant him his lifej ; but 
Feenou declared, neverthelefs, that he Ihould not 
efcape the punifhment he deferved. As wts were 
examining fcveral marks on his head, from blow^s 
this man had received with a club, before he had 
been brought to us, we w^ere informed, that thefe 
had been given to him when he was taken. The ' 
General ordered our furgeoh to drefs hisAvounds, 
and then removed him to the Efperance, in- 
tending to fet him aihore in the night, to endea- 
vour to fave his life. 

King Toubou received as a pflrefent from the 
General's hands a fuit of fcarlct, in which he 
dreiled himfelf immediately, and a large hatchet. 

Fceuou, 



March.] of la perouse. 1121 

Feenou, too, received a fcarlet fuit, with a hatchet 
of much fmaller dlmenfions ; and a few fmall 
hatchets were diftributed among the other chiefs. 
They were all on the deck, forming a circle 
round Toobou, who fat on the watch bench, with 
Feenou on his right hand, and another chief, 
named Omalai, on his left. 

Toobou appeared to us to be at leaft fixty years 
old. He was of a middling height, and ftill 
much more corpulent than Feenou. His gar- 
ments were made in the fame fhape as thofe of 
the other natives, differing only in the finenefs 
of their texture. He wore a very beautiful mat, 
faftencd round him by means of a girdle, fabri- 
cated o{ the bark of the paper mulberry tree. 

When Toobou gave orders for making kava, 
we requefted fome of the chiefs to take upon 
themfelves its preparation, and chew the roots of 
the kava pepper tree, which we offered them ; 
but they uniformly refufed, with an air of dif- 
daining an occupation beneath them. It was 
entrufted to men of an inferior clafs (mouasj, 
who were featcd near the middle of the circle 
formed by the chiefs. 

The rain, which had come on in the mean 
time, increafmg rapidly, we imagined that every 
one of them would have fought fhelter ; but they 
all braved the weather, without quitting their 

YoL.ir. 1 . places, 



122 -VOYAGE IN SEARCH . [I/QS. 

places, except the king, who withdrew into the 
General's cabin, with Feenou, and Toobou-Foa, 
one of the royal family. Kava was carried to 
them in cups, which had juft been made of 
plantain leaves, and then plantains were offered 
to them. The General invitpd them all three to 
dinner ; but the king did not permit either of the 
chiefs to fit at the fame table with him. He tail- 
ed all the difhes, refufed moft of them, and ate 
very little of thofe that he did not appear to dif- 
like, fugar excepted. The General had made him 
a prefent of a bird-organ, with which he was 
wonderfully amufed, and on which he played al- 
moft all dinner time. 

Thefe iflanders iliave with the edge of afliell, 
and the operation takes up a great deal of time. 
They were ftruck with aftonifliment, when they 
faw how quickly our barber took off the beards 
of feveral of our crew, and every one was de- 
firous of experiencing his flcill. Among the reft, 
h< had the honour of lliaving his majefty himfelf. 
About half after three, the king giving us no- 
tice of his intention to depart, an offer was made ' 
to put him afhore in the barge, which he ac- 
cepted. He was attended by a great number of 
canoes, and foon arrived at the ifland of Pangaf- 
motoo, with mofl of the chiefs who had accom- 
panied him on board. As foon as he landed, he 

ordered 



March.] of la perouse. 123 

ordered fome yams, a bread-fruit, feme pork and 
plantains, to be brought ; and we were much 
furprifed to fee him eat with a very hearty ap- 
petite ; for wc imagined that he was not hungry, 
as he had done fo little honour to our General's 
table. We had no reafon to fuppofe, that our 
difhes had not been to his tafte, fince the other 
natives w^re perfe(5lly fatisfied with them. Per- 
haps it is a point of etiquette, for his majefly not 
to indulges his appetite when he accepts an in- 
vitation, particularly from Irrangers. He after- 
wards made a fpeech, in which, no doubt, he ex- 
prefled our friendly difpofition toward them, and 
our intention to punilh all who ihould be guilty 
of robbing us ; and then he repaired to the ifland 
of Tongataboo. 

Juft before night Feenou brought the fabre 
which had been taken from one of our gunners. 
He returned it to the General, and made him a 
prefent of a very large fifh, of the perch genus^ 
the perca guttata (the ///W of Catefby). Before 
he left us, he informed the canoes around, that 
we fhould begin to trade with them again the 
, next day. 

30th. Very early the next morning our boat 
was fenton fliore to the ifland of Panga'imotoo, 
with a quantity of ftufFs and hardware. The ca- 
noes round our ihip were feveral times defired 

1 2 in 



124 ' VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l/O^' 

in vain to repair to the market, which had juft 
been re-cflabliflicd on that little ifland. We 
fancied, however, that we had difcovered efTec- 
tual means of driving them away from our ihips, 
when we faw them take flight with precipitancy, 
on fome w^ater being fpouted on them from an 
engine ; but the fuccefs of this mode was of fhort 
duration ; for foon finding that they ran no rifk 
but of a wetting, we miglit play the engine on 
them as long^as we pleafed, and they would not 
flir. Dauribeau, the captain of the Recherche, 
then gave orders, to upfet them when any of 
our boats went afliore ; and prefently the launch 
was fent off for the neareft part of the ifland, 
with various inftruments for making aflironomical 
obfervations. Accordingly our people pulled 
away, fleering directly for a canoe which had 
three men and two girls on board ; and, as they 
carried away the out-rigger, we fliould foon have 
had the vexation of feeing the/e two pretty lafl!es 
tumbled into the water ; but to prevent this ac- 
cident,- the men jumped overboard, and two of 
them fteadied the canoe, while the third fet the 
out- rigger to rights, and then they paddled away 
for Tongataboo without delay. The other ca- 
noes, warned of their danger, had the addrefs to 
avoid fuch of bur boats as afterwards endeavoured 
to upfet them. 

Feenou 



"March.] ' of la perouse. > 125 

Feenou came on board very early in the morn- 
ing, with Toobou, the kind's brother. Thcfe 
two chiefs invited the General to a feaft, which 
the King intended to give him the next day but 
one, in the illand of Tongataboo. Having re- 
quefted us to let them fee the eife(5ls of our 
fwivels and carronades, we gratified them with a 
fpecimen, at which they ihowed equal marks of 
affright and admiration. 

When we arrived on fhore, vv'e obferved with 
furprife, that the market was very well fupplied, 
though there were not a fourth as many of the 
natives prefent, as on the preceding days. Every 
thing there was going on with the greateft order. 

The fame officer (LagrandiereJ had ftill the 
management of the traffic with them for victual- 
ling the fhips. He was fmgularly delighted with 
the thought of having procured fome ends of 
iron hoops, to be cut into the fliape of carpen- 
ter's chifTels, and of having turned them to good 
account in dealing with the natives. Yet we 
had on board a great number of very good tools, 
which had been brought from Europe, to give 
them ; and we could not conceive how it was 
poffible, that the fatisfa(i:l:ion he mufl have felt 
at procuring them durable inflruments, fhould 
not have been of more weight with him, than 
any other confi deration. 

I 3 Traverfmg 



120 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [1/93. 

Traverfing the interior of the iiland, we faw a 
barber employed in iliaving one of the chiefs^ 
after 'their falhion. The -chief fat with his back 
leaning againft his hut. The barber's razor con- 
fifted of the two fliells of th.tfol£7t radlatus (vio- 
let-coloured, or radiated razor-flieath), one of 
which he held firmly againfl the fkin with the 
left hand, while with the right he applied the 
edge of the other to the hair, as near the root as 
he could, and by repeated fcraping, brought it 
away, fcarcely more than a hair at a time. We 
were afbonifhed at fo much patience, and left 
him, as might be fuppofed, long before he had 
finifhed his operation. 

The art of the potter has made no great pro- 
grefs among thefe people. We fav/ in their pof- 
feliion fome very porous earthen vefTels, which 
they had baked indeed, but very flightly. In 
thefe they kept frefh water, which would have 
quickly filtered through them, if they had not 
taken the precaution to give them a coating of 
refin. VeiTels thus made, could be of no ufe to 
them in dreffing victuals. The natives fhowed 
xis fome of a tolerably elegant form, which they 
faid had been brought from Feejee. (See Plate 
XXXI. Fig. 8.) We faw them drinking in com- 
panies out of cups of this fort, round w^hich they 
put a net of a pretty large meih, to be able to 

carry 



March.] of la perouse. 127 

carry them about eafily. When they had emp- 
tied a few of them, they went to fill them again 
out of little holes, which they had dug in the 
ground, that the water might flow into them. 
Though thefe holes were about a hundred and 
fifty toifes only from the fhore, the water was 
fcarccly to be called brackifii. As we found it 
neceffary to replace what we had expended lincc 
leaving Adventure Bay, we dug a hole in the 
ground, more than a yard deep, and at a good 
diflance from the fliore, and it was prefently flip- 
plied with very drinkable water. With this we 
filled fmall caiks, which the natives of the toua 
clafs were very ready to carry on their fhoulders 
to the boat : but the part on which the iron 
hoops of the caili refted being bare, was foon 
galled, and they gave up their work. We had 
on board, however, a little cart, which we had 
brought from Europe, and on this they readily 
confented to draw the barrels down to the fhore. 
The touaSy twelve in number, fung to mark the 
time of uniting their efforts in pulling. Thefe 
twelve foon increafed to twenty, and at firfl re- 
quired no addition to the pay we had agreed upon 
for each turn, which w^as twelve glafs beads : a 
few days after, however, they demanded a higher 
price for their labour. They afTured us that we 
iliould not find water at Tongatabuo, except in 

I 4 ponds. 



128 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l793, 

ponds, oir by digging holes in the ground as at 
Pangairaatoo ; but that very good fpring- water 
was to be procured at Kao, a fmall iHand near 
Tofoa. 

I had not yet feen a dog fmce we had been 
at anchor. In the afternoon a native brought 
one to fell us, affuring us that its llefh was" very 
good eating. They give the name of kouli to this 
animal, which in thefe illands is commonly of a 
fallow colour, fmall, and pretty nearly refembling 
the Pomeranian dog. 

Citizen Riche informed us, that the aflaflin, 
who was mentioned above, having been conveyed 
to the weflern coaft of Pangaimotoo the preced- 
ing night, by one of the Efperance's boats, had 
hefitated fome time about going on fhore, and 
had inquired of the boat's crew, with an air of 
great uneafmefs, which way Feenou had gone, 
when he went on fhore in the evening. At laft 
he ventured to land, but crawled along the beach 
on his hands and knees for more than three 
hundred paces, before he durft; proceed into the 
interior part of the ifland. 

Clofe by the market, to which the natives 
brought their different kinds of provifion, we ob- 
ferved a woman of extraordinary corpulence, at 
leafl fifty years of age, round whom the natives 
formed a very numerous circle. Some o£ them 

paid 



March.] of la perouse, 129 

paid her their re£pe6ls in our prcfence, by taking 
her right foot and placing it on their head, making 
a very low bow : others came and touched the 
fole of her right foot with their ,right hands. 
Several chiefs, whom we knew% paid her other 
marks of their reverence. We were informed 
that this lady was Queen Tine. Her hair, cut 
to the length of about two inches and half, was 
covered, as well as part of her forehead, with a 
reddifh powder. 

After having expreffed her inclination to go on 
board the Recherche, to fee the Commander of 
our expedition, Ihe invited us to accompany her, 
and immediately fet off with part of her court. 
She prefented General Dentrecafleaux with fe- 
veral very fine mats, a hog, and fome yams ; 
and he gave her in return various pieces of ftuff^ 
on which ihe appeared to fet a great value. 

Defirous of knowing what effc(fl our vocal 
mufic, accompanied by a violin and cittern, would 
have on thefe people, we entertained them with 
a fpecimen, and had the pleafure of perceiving 
that it was pleafmg to them ; but a (cw tunes 
on a bird-organ obtained more ilriking marks of 
their applaufe. 

Queen Tine, unwilling to remain in our debt, 
ordered fome young girls of her fuite to fmg. 

One 




•J3I) VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l 7^3. 

One of the prettieft immediately rofe, and we 
did not fail to applaud her performance. She 
iung, indeed, nothing but which flie continued 

apou lellcy; apou LUcy i apuu lelley ; apou lelky j 

repeating for half an hour at leafi: ; but fbe dif- 
played fo much grace in the a(5lion with which 
ilie accompanied this air, that we were forry fhe 
finiihed fo foon. She moved her arms forward, 
one after the other, following the meafure, and 
at the fame time raifed her feet alternately, 
though without quitting her place : the time 
flie marked with her fore-finger, which, after 
having been bent by the thum.b, was let go, 
againft the • middle finger ; and fometimes by 
moving the thumb againll: the fore and middle 
fingers. The beauty of thefe movements de- 
pended greatly on the fine fliape of the hand and 
arm, which is fo common among thefe people, 
and was flriking in this young woman. Soon 
after two other young girls repeated the fame air, 
which they fung in parts, one fmging uniformly 
a fifth to the other ; and feveral men rofc to 
dance to the mufic of their melodious voices. 
Thefe marked the time by movements analogous 

to 



March.] of la perouse. 3 31 

to thofe of the young women, at firft with their 
feet, and frequently carrying one of their hands 
to the oppofite arm. 

We took the words of this air (apou Iclley, 
charming evening) as a comphment from the 
iflanders, congratulating themfelves on Ipending 
the afternoon with us. 

The queen tailed the different diflies we of- 
fered her, but fhe gave a particular preference to 
preferved bananas. Our maitre-d'hotel Hood be- 
hind her in readinefs to remove her plate, but 
Ihe faved him the trouble, by keeping both it and 
-the table-cloth for herfelf. 

Tine w^as extremely tenacious of the honours, 
which the chiefs could not refufe to pay when 
they met her ; and hence fome of them avoided 
her prefence. Fecnou, and the brother of King 
Toobou were on board, and had juft promifed 
to ftay and dine with us when flie arrived. 
They immediately intreated, with great earneft- 
Iiefs, that ihe might not be permitted to come, 
upon deck ; but fhc came on board at once 
w^ithout ceremony, and the two chiefs haftened 
into their canoes, becaufe otherwife they would 
have been obliged, as many of the natives aiiiired 
us, to come and take her right foot, and carry it 
very refpedfully to their heads, as a token of their 
inferiority. The queen informed us with an air 

of 



132 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l793. 

of fatisfaftion, that King Toobou himfelf was 
bound to pay her thefe marks of rcfpecfl, becaufe 
it was from her he derived his dignity. 

After having informed us that fhe purpofed 
to take up her abode in the ifland of Pangaimotoo, 
as long as we ftaid in the road, fhe invited the 
General to come and reilde on fhore, and ileep in 
her houfe. I do not imagine that the old lady had 
any other intention, than to procure him a more 
pleafant and healthy refidcnce than he had on 
board : but the General had no opportunity of 
afcertaining with precifion her motive for this 
obliging offer, for he did not accept her invita- 
tion. 

One of our failors had in his hand a bit of 
bacon, which he was going to eat, when Feogo, 
one of Tine's maids of honour, appeared defirous 
of tailing it. He oiFered it to her, and fhe re- 
ceived it with thankfulnefs : but as fhe could not 
think of eating it in the royal prefence, the Queen 
had the complaifance to go and fit about twelve 
paces off, that her attendant might be at a dif- 
tance from her ; yet before fhe quitted her place, 
fhe had received from the young la-dy the fame 
marks of refped:, as others of the natives had al- 
ready paid her in our prefence. 

Two hours before fun-fet, Tine exprcfTcd a 
wifh to return to the ifland of Pangaimotoo, and 

Ibon 



March.] of la perouse. 133 

foon after went in our barge with part of her at- 
tendants. 

We had feen in Blights narrative, that, juft as 
be was preparing to quit the ifland of Tofoa, the 
failor, whom he had fent on fhore to'caft off the 
mooring of the launch, was killed by one of the 
natives. The people of Tongataboo informed us 
that the murder was committed by a chief named 
Moudoulalo ; but we could not learn the motive 
which had induced him to this exceffive barbarity. 
All of us were aftonifhed at the coolnefs with 
which the natives told the tale. 

We had already feen feveral knives of Engli{h 
manufacture in the hand of the natives ; and this 
morning early Feenou brought us a bayonet that 
he had received from Captain Cook, the point of 
which he requefted us to Iharpen, as it was 
blunted. 

In the afternoon we vifited fome iflets, lying 
at a very little diftance from each other between 
Tongataboo and Panga'imotoo. Thsy are all 
connected together by a fhoal, which is almoft 
wholly dry at low water. 

• We firft arrived at a bank of fand, lately emerg- 
ed from the water, on which, hov/ever, a com- 
mencement of vegetation already appeared. From 
this, called by the natives Inmi, we proceeded to 
the little iile oi Mamma ; to reach which we were 

obliged 



134 VOrYAGE iSr SEARCH [1793. 

obliged to crofs a tolerably rapid current, not 
above fix feet deep foon after the tide had begun 
to make in, and the water of which was warmed 
by paffing over a beach ftrongly heated by the 
rays of the fun. Here we found one of the 
dueen's maids of honour, to whom we prefented 
a few beads ; and immediately flie fent to catch 
a counle of fowls to offer us. Thefe we took the 
trouble of carrying, left fhe fliould have been 
chagrined at our refufal of them. She was very 
careful to let us know^ that flie did not give them 
by way of barter ; affecfling to repeat with an air 
of dignity ikdi fokatazi, and to inform us by the 
word adoupe, that fhe made us a prefent of them. 
Indeed the chiefs never offered to barter their ar- 
ticles for ours ; they made us prefents, and re- 
ceived whatever we thought proper to give. 

It is remarkable that the natives brought to 
our market feveral cocks, but very feldorh any 
hens. Thefe they kept to hatch chickens, and 
of cotirfe they fold us but few eggs likewifc. 

The two fowls now given us were hens, and 
had been caught in our fight with the fame kind 
of net, as we had feen employed to take fifh in 
the open road. 

The foil of the illand of Manima is little culti- 
vated; we fawin it, however, a few fields of yams, 
cocoa trees, and plantains. 

After 



March.] of la perouse. 135 

After croffing a channel as fhallow as the' 
preceding, we arrived at Oneata. Having the 
curiofity to examine the infide of a habitation, 
conftrucfted with much art, we were greatly fur- 
prizcd to fee a chief, who, fitting very gravely 
near the middle of the hut, permitted a fore- 
mail-man of our fhip to take the greateft free- 
doms with one of the prettied girls in the ifland. 
He inforrhed us, on offering fome cocoa nuts, 
that he could not allow us to drink their liquor 
within his dwelling., We could not have fup- 
pofed that the witnefs of the party, we had jull 
happened to interrupt under his roof, would have 
been fo rigid to perfons who came thither merely 
to quench their thirft ; but we made a point of 
. not difputing the matter with him. 

Two natives arrived in the mean time, bring- 
ing in their hands fome very ripe cocoa nuts 
opened, and with thefe we faw them prepare a 
difh, of which they appeared to be very fond. 
With fhells, fixed in a piece of wood by way of 
handle, they fcraped out the nuts, which they 
bruifcd vvith a very hot flone, fo as to make a 
pulp of it ; this they reduced to the confiftence 
of a pudding, after mixing it with fome frefh 
roafted bread-fruit ; which done, they formed 
it into balls ; and thefe they ate immediately. 
■ Under a large fhed we faw a double canoe, 

forty 



130 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l793. 

forty feet long, placed there by the natives to 
prefcrve it againft the injuries of the weather. 

We were not far from the little ifland called 
Nougou NougoUf when fome of the natives pointed 
out to us an iflet, by the name of Mackaha, very 
near Pangairaotoo. We proceeded toward the 
lafh ifland, and, as the tide was rifmg, we were 
obliged to wade up to our middles, to reach it. 
We foon reached the place, where the queen 
kept a regular court. It was under the fhade of 
a very bufliy bread-fruit tree, at a fmall diftance 
from our market. There fhe was giving a con- 
cert of vocal mufic, in v/hich Futtafaihe fung, 
he regulating the time, which all the muficians 
followed with the greateft accuracy. Some per- 
formed their parts by accompanying the fimple 
melody of the reft with various modvdations. In 
thefe w^e occafionally noticed difcords, which 
feemed to be highly agreeable to the ears of the 
natives. 

During tliis concert we faw a great number 
of people arrive, each carrying a long pole on 
his lliouldcr, at the ends of which hung fifh and 
yams ; and with thefe they immediately formed 
the bafc of a quadrangular pyramid, which they 
built up nearly to the height of two yards. 
This was a prcfent for General Dentrecalleaux, 
to whom Tine was giving an entertainment. 

She 



April.] of la perouse. 1^7 

She warned us againft the danger of walking 
alone about the illand in the evening, telling 
us, that thieves might take advantage of the 
darknefs, to knock us down with their clubs, and 
then rob us. 

On the ]fh of A.pril, at fix in the morning, the 
General fct off, agreeably to the invitation of 
King Toobou, who meant to give him an en- 
tertainment in the ifland of Tongataboo. We 
accompanied him, with almoft all the officers of 
the expedition, and a detachment well armed. 

Some of the natives, who followed us in their 
canoes, made us coaft along fhore toward the 
weft for fome time, in order to condudl us to a 
place, where, they informed us, we fhould find 
a great number of the natives affemblcd with 
feveral of their chiefs. As foon as we landed, 
Feenou came to meet the General, and accom- 
pany him into the midft of a large aficmbly of 
the natives, with Omaldi at their head. This 
chief invited him to fit down on his left hand, 
after having ordered the natives, to arrange them- 
felves in a circle round him. We refted our- 
felves a moment on fome m.ats fpread on the 
ground, under the iliade of feveral trees, fome 
of w^hich were the cerhera manghas (Indian mango 
tree), others the hernand'ia ovtgcra (ovigerous 
jack-in-the-box tree), the fruit of which is ufed. 

Vol. II. K by 



138 VOYAGE IN SEARCH- £179^^ 

by thefe people as an ornament. Soon after tve 
went to fee a very lofty llicd, which ferved as a. 
fhelter to a war canoe, eighty-feet long, the in- 
fide of which was ftrengthened by very ftouf 
knees, placed about a yard diftant from each 
other. Feenou, after having made us admire the 
eonftru(5lion of this double canoe, informed uS;.. 
that he had taken, it in an engagement, which he 
had fought with the people of the Feejee Wands. 

As we proceeded toward the weit, we croiTed 
a fpaeious enclofure, formed of palifades, the 
pads of which, placed in an oblique direction, 
were tolerably near to each other,, within this 
grew bread-fruit trees, plantain trees, the corypha 
timhracnllfera' (great fan palm), &c. Farther on, 
in an enclofkire of much lefs extent, we found a 
fmall hut, of a conical figure, in whlcfh, we were 
informed, were depofited the remains of a chief 
lately dead ; nnd a caution w"as given u&, that 
entering into it was' prohibited. 

After this we walked' on near a quarter of an^ 
hour in a narrow path, bounded on each fide by 
palifades, till we reached an extenfive efplanade,. 
where King Toobouwas foon to arrive (See Plate 
XXVL). ^ ■ 

We were invited by Omalai, to take the cool 
air under a flied, the fliape of which was nearly 
half an oval, twelve yards in length, by five in 

breadth. 



April.] of la perouse. 130 

breadth. The roof, covered with the leaves of 
the vacoua, which rendered it impenetrable to 
the heavieft Ihower, had an elevation of about 
five yards and a half, and defeended within three 
quarters of a yard of the ground, on which fome 
fine mats were fpread. The floor was raifed fix 
or eight inches higher than the furrounding eartfe, 
which fecured it from all danger of being over- 
flowed ; and the roof was fiipported by ten pillars. 

At length Toobou arrived with two of his 
daughters, who had poured on their hair an abun- 
dance of cocoa-nut oil, and wore each a neck- 
lace, made with the pretty feeds of the ahrus pre- 
caior'ins. 

The natives formed a great concourfe on all 
fides. According to our eftimation, at leafl four 
thoufand of them were prefent. 

The place of honour, no doubt, was on the 
king's left hand, for it was there he invited the 
General to fit, who immediately ordered the pre- 
fents, which he intended for Toobou, to be 
brought forward. The king exprefTed much 
thankfulnefs for them ; but, of all that was offered 
him, nothing fo much excited the admiration of 
this numerous affembly, as a piece of crimfbn 
damafk, the lively colour of which produced from 
all fides an exclamation of eho ! eho ! which-they 
continued repeating a long time, w4th an appear- 

K 2 ance 



140 - .^ VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l/QS. 

ance of the greateft furprifc. They uttered the 
fame exclamation, when we unrolled a few pieces 
of ribbon, in which red was the predominant co- 
lour. The General then prefcntcd a fhe-goat 
with kid, a he-goat, and a couple of rabbits, one 
a buck, the other a doe, of which the king pro- 
mifed to take the greateft care, and to let them 
breed and- multiply in the ifland. 

Omalai, who, Toobou told us, was his fon, alfo 
received fome prefents from the General, as did 
ieveral other chiefs. 

On our right, toward the north-eaft, were 
thirteen muficians, featcd under the fliade of a 
bread-fruit tree, which was loaded with a prodi- 
■glous quantity of fruit. They fung together in 
different parts. Four of them held in their hands 
a bamboo of a yard, or a yard and a half long, 
with which they beat time on the ground ; the 
iongeft . of thefe bamboos fometimes ferving to 
mark the meafure. The founds thefe inftru- 
ments gave approached tolerably near thofe of the 
tambourin, and the following were their propor- 
tions to each other. Two bamboos of the middle 
^ length were in unifon, the longefl was a note and 
a half below them, and the fllortcft was two 
notes and a half above. > The mulician, that fung 
the counter-tenor, made- his voice be hear-d much 
above the reft, though it was a little hoarfe-; and 

at 



April.] of la perouse. 141 

at the fame time he accompanied it by beating 
with two Httle fticks of cafluarina on a bamboa 
fix yards long, cleft throughout its whole length. 
Three muficians placed before the others expreffed 
the. fubjecl of their fong by adion alfo, which no 
doubt they had thoroughly ftudied, for their gef-! 
tures were performed all together, and in the. 
fame manner. Every now and then they turn<?,d 
toward the king, making not ungraceful motions 
with their arms : fometimes they bowed their 
heads quickly, till the chin touched the breaft, 
and fhook them feveral times, &c. 

In the mean time Toobou prefented the G<:- 
neral with fome pieces of ftuff fabricated with 
the bark of the paper mulberry tree, caufmg them 
to be fpread abroad with a great deal of oftenta- 
tion, that we might be fenfible of all the value of 
the gift. 

One of his minifters, who fat on his right hand, 
ordered kava to be prepared, and prefently a 
wooden bowl, of an oval fhape, and a yard long 
(See Plate XXXI, Fig. 9), was brought in full of 
this liquor. 

The muficians, no doubt, had referved their 
choiceft pieces for this inftant ; as now, at every 
paufe they made, the cry of mdii, mdli, refounded 
from every quarter, and the reiterated applaufes 

K3 of 



142 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l793. 

of the natives informed us, that this muiic made 
tL very ftrong and pleafmg imprefTion upon them. 

The kava was then diftributed to the different 
chiefs, by him who had given orders for its pre- 
J)aration. He fent it to them in cups, which 
were made on the ipot with the leaves of the 
plantain, and every time he offered a cup, he 
pronounced, in a pretty loud voice, the name of 
him for whorh it was intended. Feenou he ferved 
firft, faying maye maa Feenou ; and he did the fame 
to the other chiefs, all whofe names we could 
eaiily pronounce. Some of thefe, perhaps, the 
reader will not be difpleafed to hear : they were 
Ntifatoa, Fefe, Mqfi, Famouna, Fatoumona, Szc. 

We may prefume, it was neceffary, that fomc 
of the chiefs fhould judge of the goodnefs of the 
liquor, before the king drank, for it was not of* 
fered to him till it came to the fourth pup. None 
Was fent to his daughters ; and indeed it always 
appeared to us, that this Hquor was rcferved cn-^ 
tirely for the men, 

Notwithflanding the prefence of the General, 
the king very foon fell afleep, mid fnored aloud, 
with his legs croffed, and his head bowed down 
almoft to his knees. When he awoke, we fhow- 
td him a drawing of a cow, and afked if that 
given to King Poulaho by Captain Cook had bred. 

Hq 



April.] of la perouse. 143 

He knew the animal perfecftly well, which he 
called boMa toote, and told us, there were none 
now at Tongataboo, but there were at Hapaee. 
Several of the natives, however, ailured us, imi- 
tating at the fame time tolerably well their low- 
ing, that there were fome at Tongataboo, though 
others denied it. Thus we were unable to learn 
what had become of the bull and cow, which 
Captain Cook had left on the ifland ; and it was 
the fame with regard to the horfe and mare, 
which he had given to Feenou. Perhaps they 
were afraid that we Ihould require fome of thefe 
•animals from them. 

Quitting the aiTembly, we walked toward the 
«cafl, .afcending a gentle flopc. At firft we pafTed 
.along paths bordered with palifadoes^ but we 
ibon reached the end of thefe,. and came to fields 
of yams fully cropped. Farther on, the ground, 
recently turned up, exhibited every appearance of 
fertility^ 

We -foon reached a delightful fpot on the top 
of a little hill, where the natives had formed a 
ibrt of rotunda, about four yards wide, with pali- 
fades, and fome fhrubs cut with art. * Under this 
jrotunda we ftill faw the remains of lava roots, 
that had been chewed ; and round it v/ere twenty- 
four fmall huts, conftru^led, in a. circle of fifteen 
^or fixtcen yards diameter. Thefe huts were all 

K 4 covered 



144 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [T793, 

covered with cocoa leaves, interlaced together ; 
thfeir fhape was nearly that of half an oval, three 
yards long by two broad ; and they were divided 
at the top, throughout their whole length, by a 
very narrow Hit, which was the only opening in 
them, though there was no entering without fe- 
parating its edges. We were informed by fomc 
of the natives, who had followed us, that the 
king frequently came to this place, to drink kava, 
with feveral of the chiefs of the illand, and that 
then each went to take a nap in thefe fort of 
huts. 

On returning toward the place of entertain- 
ment, we went round the largeft circle formed 
by the natives ; in the midft of which we faw fe- 
veral ' egui s wives. The wife of Futtafaihe at- 
tradted.almofh every eye by her beauty ; but fhe 
took care, from time to time, to acquaint\is, that 
it was her duty to preferve her fidelity to her huf- 
band. This fhe exprefled with great fimplicity, 
by taboo m'lt^t mitzi, words of which I cannot 
give a literal translation, as may be feen by the 
vocabulary of the language of the Friendly Iflands, 
which will be found at the end of this work. 

We obferved in the hands of one lady, who 
appeared to be of fome confideration, a fort of 
mat, about two feet fquare, and of a white co- 
lour, made of the hair of a horfc'stail. Pof- 

fibly 



April.] of la perouse. 14S 

fibly they were obtained from thofe which Cook 
left on the ifland ; but Ihe would not fatisfy oitr 
curiofity on this head. 

The King had ordered his fubjedls to bring the 
prefents which he intended for the General ; and 
ever fince half after ten we had {etn many arrive 
at iritervals, each of them carrying on his Ihoulder 
a bamboo two yards long, at the ends of which 
hung fmall filhes ofthejcan/s and c/iatodon genera, 
moft of them ready drelTed, and wrapped in 
cocoa-leaves; others brought bread-fruit, yams, 
(&c, ; and prefently, by laying their bamboos ' 
acrofs e^ch other, they raifed tvy^o portions of 
triangular pyramids;, one of them two yards high, 
the other one yard only. The raw fifli already 
began to ftink very much. 

About one o'clock in the afternoon Toobou 
went away, without faying a word to any perfon. 
We then left the affembly, and were accompanied 
to the place where we landed by Feenou and 
Omala'i, who ordered a whole hogjuft drcifed, 
fome fifli, yams, and bread-fruit, to be brought 
us, and invited us to fit down to our repafl ; but 
their hog not being half ready, for fiich is their 
ufual mpde of cookery, we preferred going on 
board to dinner. 

They then requefted us to accept thefe dif- 
ferent articles of provifion, which they ordered 

to 



J40 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l7(?3. 

to be carried into our long-boat, while others of 
the natives, in obedience to the orders of Toobou, 
were filling it with the eatables taken from the 
pyramids, that had been €re6led for our Com- 
mander. In a very little time, every thing was 
ready for our departure. 

Our boats having been obliged to pufh off from 
the fliore, on account of the low water, we could 
not reach them but by croffing a coral bank co- 
vered with water for more than three hundred 
paces : but we found the natives extremely civil ; 
for, that we might not be wetted, they carried 
us to fome rocks juft above water, to w^hich 
others came with their canoes to fetch us, and 
conveyed us to our boats. 

The men who carried us appeared well fatis- 
fied with the articles we gave them for their 
trouble ; but in this fhort paiTage others contrived 
to gain ftill more, by robbing us at their eafe, 
after having crept flily behind us, while their 
countrymen had us on their backs. All thefe 
pickpockets, however, did not meet with equal 
iucccfs, for we gave chace to fome, whom wc 
forced to reftore what they had taken. 

As foon as we got on board, the commanding 
officer informed us that, during our abfence, he 
had caufed a native to be feized, at the moment 
■when he was going off with fevcral articles of 

hardw^are. 



April.] of la perouse. 147 

hardware, which he had ftolen between decks ; 
and that Futtafaihe, reprobating the habit of pil- 
fering, of which the natives were every day guilty 
towards us, had affeded to fay pubhcly, that the 
culprit fhould be puniflied with death. But this, 
they foon perceived, was all artifice on the part of 
the chief; for, as foon as they began to infiift 
the punifhment of the rope's end on the pilferer, 
he interceded for, his pardon, which, however, 
was not granted ; and Futtafaihe feemed to be 
greatly affed:ed at his receiving the five-and- 
twenty ftripes, which he had been condemned to 
fuffer. 

2d. Pretty early the next morning, we re- 
ceived a vifit from Tonga, who accompanied his 
father Toobou, the King's brother. They both 
took a great deal of trouble to explain to us all 
the dignities of their family. 

Tonga fcveral times gave us proofs of great 
intelligence, in particular when we fhowed him 
a chart of the Friendly Iflands con{l:rud;ed by 
Captain Cook. He firft glanced his eye rapidly 
over the archipelago ; and then, flopping at 
Tongataboo, he obferved to us, that feveral reefs 
of rocks had been laid down which did not exift ; 
informing us that, to the north-weft we fhould 
find a paiTage, through which we might eafily 
<:arry our veflels into the open fea. This infor- 

mation 



148 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l 793. 

mation was the more important to us, bccaufe we 
had fuppofed, that we muft get out of the road 
through the narrow channel by which wc had en- 
tered; and in which we Ihould probably have 
h^d to work out againft the prevailing winds, 
which would be extreniely favourable to our paf- 
fmg out throTigh the new channel. Tonga of- 
fered to fhovv it us, and would fleep on board 
that night, to condud: to it Citizen Beaupre, 
our engineer- geographer, who would afcertain 

its pofition. 

On an excuriion w^e made into the country 

neareft the anchoring place, we found among a 
group of the natives a young perfon, who had all 
the characleriftics of an albino, and who w-as 
in other refpe6ls of a very fickly complexion, as 
is commonly the cafe, for this deviation from na- 
ture is owing to a ftate of difeafe. 

3d. In the morning of the third, having lur- 
prifed fome of the natives, who were making 
off to the coafl of Tongataboo with fome ar- 
ticles, which they had juft ftolen from our Ihip, 
the commanding officer fcnt fome of our people 
in purfuit of them; when one of the party, who 
had caufed himfelf to be announced as a chief, 
faid, that he would punifh them himfelf, and 
would bring us the next day the things that had 
been ftolen. But it appeared, that he was con- 
nected 



April.] of la perouse. ' 149 

nedlcd with the thieves, for he took care never 
to return on board again. 

When we went afhore, Omalai accompanied 
us, and admired the boat's rudder for a long time. 
He was defirous of fleering himfelf, and did fo 
with great ilcill. Thefc people ufe nothing but 
paddles for fleering their canoes. 

The ladies, in drcffing their hair, made ufe 
of cocoa-nut oil, previoufly perfumed with a 
fmall feed, which they cail la7iga kali, and which 
is gathered on the ifland of Tongataboo. On 
examining a little of the oil, we obferved, that 
fome of the bruifed nut, which in their language 
is called mou, was mixed with it, Theyexpofed 
the nuts to the fun, after having fprcad them on 
mats, in order to dry them, before they prefs out 
the oil, with which the women anoint the upper 
parts of the body, no doubt to preferve the fup- 
plenefs of the ll^in, and to prevent too copious 
perfpiration. They prefene the oil in the feed- 
pod of the mehdhius fcandenSy after having taken 
out the feed. When we bou2;ht fome of thefc 
little phials, a reprefentation of which may be 
feen in Plate XXXI, Fig. 14, we frequently threw 
away the oil, left' it ihould run out in our pockets; 
but the women, feeing us with regret wafte an 
article which they much value, commonly came 
forward to receive it on their heads, arid then, 

with 



J50 VOYAGE IK SEARCH [l793. 

With their hands, they ipread it over their fhoul- 
ders and arms. 

The natives had already fold us a great number 
of clubs of various forms, and falliioned with 
fkill, as may be feen in Plate XXXIII : and we ^ 
faw feveral who were employed in cutting out 
others with Ihark's teeth fixed at the extremity 
of a piece of wood (Plate XXXII, Fig. 23). 
We were aftoniflied to fee them cut with a chifel 
like this the wood of the caftiar'may notwith- 
ftanding its extreme hardnefs. Others already 
handled the iron tools they had obtained from us 
with coniiderable dexterity. All thefe workmen 
had a little bag of malting, containing pumice- 
ftoncs, with which they poliihed their work. 

I obferved feveral cotton-plants of the fpecies 
called gojjipmm rdlghfiim, growing in unculti- 
vated places ; and I faw, with furprife, that the 
fine cotton, which might be procured from it in 
abundance,, was not ufed by the native^ in any of 
their works. 

About nine in the evening we perceived a canoe 
cloie by one of our buoys. Apprehenlive that 
the people in her would cut the buoy-rope, we 
fent one of our boats in chace of her ; but the 
boat had fcarcely put off from the fhip*s fide, 
when fomebody was heard to fall into the water. 
Oar men immediately haftcned to the perfon's 

affiftance ; 











Jhif'^trJ^--i'forJka,i(e. Ticmrlitlv.'i^^/r'rrC/iPOO. 



April.] of la perouse. 151 

affiflance ; when feeing him fwim away, with- 
out fpeaking a word, we had no doubt but it was 
a thief making off with his booty. He was pur- 
fued immediately, frequently efcaped by diving, 
and was not taken at laft till he had been 
wounded in the thigh with a boat-hook, which 
was employed to catch hold of him. As foon 
as he was brought on board, he was fecnred upon 
deck, where he remained all night. He confeflcd 
that, having taken fevcral things out of our 
launch, he had conveyed them to the canoe, 
which was in waiting for them near our buoy, 
and had made off without delay. In half an hour 
afterwards, we fancied w^e faw her llowly ap- 
proaching our fliip aftern, in fearch of the native 
whom we had feized. The men in our yawl im- 
mediately pulled away toward her, and when they 
came up with her, th'i;y found in her only one 
man and two paddles : but they foon difcovered 
that ihe had brought us another thief, who hadl^ 
roamed about the fhip till the arrival of another 
canoe, that came to convey him afliore. As foon 
as our people got fight of her, they gave her 
chace, but the natives in her paddled away with 
iuch fpecd, that it was impoffible to overtake 
them. 

4th. At three o'clock in the morning Citizen 
Beaupre returned with Tonga, after having ex- 
amined 



155 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l7Q3, 

amlncd the paiTage toward the north -weft, of 
which Tonga had given us information. They 
had run along very clofe to Attata, which they 
had left on the larboard, as they failed from our 
anchorage. Kepa, the chief of this little ifland, 
had come to meet them, and, received them with 
great civility. In the morning he came to fee 
us, and inquired after Captain Cook, v.'ho, he 
told us, was his friend. On being informed of 
his death, he could not refrain from tears, and 
took out of his girdle a Ihark's tooth, with which 
he was going to v/ound his cheeks, in order to 
exprefs the violence of his grief, if we had not 
prevented him. 

The art of phyfic is prad:ifed among thofe 
people with a parade of myftery. One of our 
crew, who had accompanied us along the beach, 
having hurt his wrift by an exertion, a native of- 
fered to cafe the pain, and fucceeded pretty 
quickly by fqueezing and preffing the part in- 
jured, (en viajjant la partie hlefsee) ; at the fame 
time he blew upon it repeatedly, intending, no 
doubt, that we fhould afcribe the cure to his 
breath. 

, On the fea-fide we fiw feveral natives occupied 
in fquaring fome large ftones of the calcareous 
kind, which, we we're informed, were intended 
to be em.ployed in' burying a chief, who was re- 
lated 



April.] of la perouse. 153 

latcd to Futtafaihc. They firft removed the earth 
from them, and then fcparated them by breaking 
them with a volcanic pebble, round w^hich, near 
the middle, they took the precaution to wrap 
pieces of matting, to prevent the fplinters from 
flying into their eyes. They w^ere Scarcely below 
the furface of the earth, and arranged in ftrata 
about four inches thick. 

We had before obfervcd among thefe people a 
game with the hands, which they call hagut, 
and wdilch requires great attention. Tw^o play at 
it, and it confifls in one's endeavouring inftantly 
to repeat the figns made by the other, while thc 
former makes figns in his turn, which the other is 
to repeat in like manner. We faw two in a 
party at no great diftance from our market, who 
>ver<? fo quick at this exercife, that our eyes were 
fcarcely able to follow their motions'. 

' Citizen Lcgrand, who had been fent the day 
before to difcover fome paffagcs to leeward of our 
anchorage, returned in the evening, after having 
found two towards the north. 

5th. Early in the morning I fet off, with all the 
other naturalifts of our expedition, for the ifland 
of Tongataboo. Some of the natives would carry 
us thither in their little canoes, but moft of us, 
not being fufficiently careful in preferving our 
equilibrium, upfet them as foon as they put off. 
Vol. IL L ' We 



■V> 



154 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l793 

We then determined to go in their double ca- 
noes, which they managed very ikilfully, and 
loon fet us alhorc, making the paflage under fail. 
The maft was fet up in that canoe which was to 
leeward. 

We were o^bliged to get out of the canoes more 
than fix hundred ' paces from the Ihore, on ac- 
count of the fliallownefs of the water, through 
which the natives carried us on their backs. 
They then fhowed us the dwclUng of Toobou, 
the king's brother, where we flopped; and the 
gardener made him a prefent of feveral kinds of 
feeds, that were brought from Europe, chiefly of 
culinary vegetables, which the chief promifed us 
to cultivate with care. We left him, to ftrike 
into the woods; the foi^l of which was of a cal- 
careous nature ; and we obferved in different 
places heaps of madrepores, which proved that 
the waters of the feahad long covered the ground. 
On the trees we obferved many large bats, of the 
fpecies called vefpeM'io vampynis (the vampire 
bat), which the inhabitants told us were very 
good food. 

We were near the middle of the wood, when 
a native, who had crept behind one of our party, 
fnatched out of his hands a pair of pincers, which 
he ufed for catching infe6ls. The thief inftantly 
took to his heels ; but he had fcarcely run four- 

fcore 



April.] of la perouse. 155 

fcore paces, when, finding himfelf brifkly and 
clofely purfued, he placed himfelf behind a tree, 
round which he turned feveral times, to avoid 
being caught. Our companion, however, laid 
hold of his clothes, and fancied himfelf on the 
point of recovering his pincers, as he imagined 
he had the thief faft : but what was his furprife, 
when the other loofened his girdle, and left his 
clothes behind him, to efcape with the article he 
had ftolen ! 

We foon'got into the fields, where v/e faw the 
property of each individual divided into fmall en- 
clofurcs, furrounded by palifades, and completely 
cultivated. The Indian cole, arum efculentum, 
grew there vigoroufly among many other vegeta- 
bles, which I have already mentioned, and v/hich 
equally with it are ufed as food by the natives. 
The fugar- canes we faw there, were planted at 
a pretty confiderable diftance from each other, 
under the Ihade of the hiocarpus eduUs, the fruit 
of which thefe people roaft and eat, its flavour 
much refembling that of the chefnut. In the 
fame enclofure, we faw feveral of the orange- 
leaved Indian mulberry trees (morhida citrtfolmj, 
loaded uith ripe fruit, which is much efleemed 
by the natives. They brought us a great quan- 
tity of this fruit for a few days when we firft an- 
L 2 chore d 



.156 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [I/QS*^ 

• 

chored here> but we rcfufed it on account of its 
infipidity. 

After proceeding foitie way to the caftward, 
we flopped, to examine two little huts, erc(5led 
in an enclofure of fmall extent, and fhadowed by 
fbme fine flTaddock trees, loaded with fruit, and 
.feveral cafuarhia trees. Some natives informed 
us, that the remains of two chiefs of Toobou's 
family had been depofited in them. We lifted 
up the mat, which clofed the entrance of the 
larger. The furface of -the ground within was 
covered with fand, and toward the middle we 
obferved an oblong fquarcj formed of fmall peb- 
bles of different colours. None of the natives 
who were with us, would gather any of the 
fliaddocks, no doubt from refpe6l to the dead, 
though we defired to buy fome of them. They 
faid that they could not fell them to us. 

In a fhort time we returned to the houfe ot 
Toobou, to whom we made a complaint againft 
the flealerof the pincers. He promifed to return 
• them to us the next day ; and he kept his word. 
This chief prefTed us to fpend the night in his 
habitation; but wx would not accept his ofFer^ 
left our abfencc lliould occaiion any uncalinefs on 
board. 

Thefe people are accuflomcd to geld their pigs, 

with 



APEIt.] OF LA PEROUSE. 157 

with a view to render the flcfh more delicate. 
We faw this operation performed on a very 
young pig, which one of the natives laid on the 
back, after having tied his legs, while another 
made an incifion into the fcrotum with the edge 
of a piece of bamboo, and removed the tcfticles, 
feparating them from the parts to which they ad- 
hered, with all the dexterity of an anatomift. 

Toobou treated us with fowls broiled on the 
coals ; yams, plantains, and bread-fruit, roafccd 
under the afhes ; and the liquor of the cocoa-nut 
to drink. 

Three of the dau2;hters of this chief came to 
keep us company. They -talked a great deal ; and 
though wc were very hungry, they did not fcruple 
to interrupt us frequently, by forcing us to anfwxr 
their queilions, which related chieflv to the cuf- 
toms o{ the French, particularly thofe of the 
women. As they obferved our feamen addrei^ 
every one indifcriminatcly, they enquired with 
earnellncfs, whether the women w ere not lahooed 
in France ; that is to fay, whether they enjoyed 
the fame libertv as mofl: of thofe in their idand. 
The anfwer, by which we endear oiircd to con- 
vey to tiicm an idea of our cuftoms, pieafed them 
highly. They informed us, that the egiiis (chiefs) 
x)f Tongataboo had feveral wives ; and aik.ed how 
|i^any wi\"es a French egul ufually had. When 
L 3 they 



158 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l 793.. 

they underflood that each had but one, they burft 
out into a laugh ; and we had great trouble to 
perfuade them, that the egut lai (kings) of Eu- 
rope, had no more, which gave them no very 
high idea of their power. 

Of all the articles with which we prefented the 
ladies, odoriferous waters were moft efleemed. 
They appeared to us as paffionately fond of per- 
fumes, as moll of the inhabitants of warm cli- 
mates : and yet their bodies were partly be- 
fmeared w^ith cocoa-nut oil, w^hich difFufed a dif- 
agrecaMe odour. 

One of the fineft girls in this party having the 
little finger of the left hand wrapped round w^ith 
a piece of fluff of the paper mulberry, which ap- 
peared bloody, we begged to fee the wound. An- 
other immediately took down from the roof, 
under which we fat, a piece of a plantain' leaf, out 
of which fhe drew the firfl two joints of the little 
finger, of the young girl, who had them very 
lately cut off, in order to cure her, as flie told us, 
of a fevere difeafe. She fhowed us the hatchet, 
made of a volcanic flone, which had been ufed 
for the operation ; and informed us, that the edge 
had firfl been placed at the extremity of the 
third phalanx of the finger, and then the operator 
flruck a fmart blow on the head of this hatchet 
with the handle of another. 

This 



April.] of la perouse. 15q 

This young pcrfbn foon lefrus ; but, before llie 
went away, Ihe kilTed Toobou's daughters after 
the manner of the inhabitants of the Friendly 
Iflands, which is by touching with the tip of the 
nofe the nofe of the pcrfon you falute. It is re- 
markable, that thefe illanders, who pretty much 
refemble Europeans, have, notwithftanding, the 
extremity of the nofe a little flattened : this flight 
deformity may very probably be owing to the 
cuftom, of which I have juft fpoken. 

Toobou's daughters changed names with us ; 

an eftablifhed cuftom among thefe people, to 

teftify their affe6lion. They then played a very 

monotonous duet on flutes made of bamboo : but 

r 
we were rriuch amufeci'at feemg them blow with 

the^nofe into a hole at the extremity of the in- 
flrument, in order to make it found. We re- 
ceived from them as a prefent fome combs of a 
very elegant fliape, represented in Plate XXXII. 
Fig. 21. 

The natives, who formed a circle round us, 
having ilolen feveral of our things, we complained 
of it to Toobou's daughters, who foon after left us 
without faying a word, probably to go in fearch 
of their father, and rcqueft him to come and put 
an end to thefe pilferings ; but, as we could not 
wait till their return, we foon began to walk to- 
ward the ifland of Panga'imotoo. The tide being 
L 4 very 



l60 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l/O^. 

very low, we eafily paiTed over the fhoals, which 
connect the iflets with the principal ifland. We 
flopped about half way at a hut, where we were 
witnefics of the manner, in which a woman was 
eating her meal, that appeared to us laughable 
enough. Sitting near a poft, and motionlefs as 
a ftatue, fhe opened her mouth from time to time, 
to receive morfels of bread-fruit, which another 
woman put into it. We were informed, that it 
was not allo\^'able far her to touch any kind of 
food with, her own hands, hecaufe a few days be- 
Fore flie had waflied the body of a deceafed chief. 

When we arrived at Pangai'motoo, Queen Ti- 
ne, fitting under a fhed covered vsfith cocoa-leaves, 
and ereded under the Ihade of feveral fine bread- 
fruit trees, was giving an entertainment to Gene- 
ral Dentrecafteaux. She firft ordered fome young 
perfons of her attendants to dance, which they 
did with infinite gracefulnefs, fniging at the fame 
time, while Futtafaihe, who was flanding, di- 
rected their movements, and animated them by 
his voice and geflures. (See Plate XXV 1 1.) 

After this we had a grand concert, which dif- 
fered little from that the Iving had given us a few 
days before, only on the prefent occafion the ex- 
preffion of joy was much more lively. 

The Queen was furrounded by women, while 
^ great number of rnen kept at a little diflancQ 

oppofitc 



April.] of la perouse. 30i 

oppofite to her, forming a circle round the mufi- 
cians. 

When the women had ceafed dancing, feveral 
men rofe up, each holding in his hand a little 
club, nearly of the fliape of a paddle. Thefe they 
brandifhed about, keeping time with much pre- 
cifion, and making different movements with 
their feet. The muficians, after they had fung 
fome tunes in very flow time,- fung often very 
quick, which gave this fort of pyrrhic dance a very 
animated adlion, that we admired for a long while. 
The fubjed: of this dance excited our curiofity ; 
but we foon found, that its obje6l was to cele- 
brate the great deeds of fome of their warriors. 
The women occafionally united their voices with 
thofe of the men, accompanying their fong with 
very graceful movements. 

One of the armourers of the Efperance was 
much furprized to fee among thefe dancers, and 
not far from Futtafaihe, the native who had 
flolen his fabre ; this chief having always aflured 
us that he could never find out the thief. It ap- 
peared to us, however, that it was one of his at- 
tendants: but he retired with precipitation as foon 
as he perceived that' he was known. 

During this time a pyramid of bamboos had 
been ereded, to which w^ere fufpended different 

fruits. 



jgi VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l/^Q^. 

fruits, defigned as a prefent to the General from 
Queen Tine. 

We cxpreffed a ftrong deflrc to fee fome of the 
natives engage in a wreftling match ; but we were 
told that a fpe^lacle of this fort was never exhi- 
bited before the Queen. 

• This entertainment had attracted a great num- 
ber of the natives, among whom were feveral 
thieA^es, whofe impudence was continually in- 
creafmg. They had already taken feveral articles 
from fome or other of us by open force, and run 
off with them into the woods. 

More than thirty of us were aifembled toge- 
ther, and we were quenching our thirft with the 
delicious liquor of the cocoa-nuts, which Tine 
had juft prefented to the General, when a native 
had the audacity to fnatch a knife out of one of 
our hands. Indignant at fuch effrontery, feveral 
of our party immediately ran after the thief, and 
purfued him as far as the illand of Tongataboo ; 
but, finding themfelves furrounded by a great 
number of the natives, they prefently returned to- 
ward our anchoring place. The fmith of the Re- 
cherche, however, a German by birth, thought it 
was proper to fliow more courage than the rell, by 
venturing farther and farther among the* natives. 
Thefc foon faced about, purfued him in their 

turn^ 



April.] of la perouse. 163 

turn, as foon as they found him inchned to malte 
off, and even attempted to ftrike him with their 
clubs : but he kept them at bay a long time, by 
prefenting to the moil forward a bad piftol, which 
he feveral times attempted to fire. Being now 
about feven hundred yards only from our fliips, he 
fancied himfeif fecure from any attempt on their 
part, when on^oj^them laid open his IkuU with 
a club, and another threw a fpear at his back. 
A great number of them fell upon him, and con- 
tinued their blows till they thought he was dead. 
One of them tried repeatedly to fhoot him with 
his own piftol, which they had feized, but fortu- 
nately the priming was gone. They were already 
dividing his clothes, when they were obferved 
from the Efperance, and a cannon v/as immedi- 
ately fired, the ball of which pafTed very near the 
affaflins, and quickly difperfed them. We ran 
from all quarters to the affiftance of the unfor- 
tunate fmith. One of the crew, having come 
along the beach to his fuccour, was attacked by 
a native, who knocked out tw^o of his teeth with 
his club ; but the aflault coft him his life, for he 
was inftantly fhot dead. Our fmith was foon 
raifed from the ground, and, though his head was 
laid open at the left frontal fjnus to a confiderable 
extent, and he had other very dangerous wounds, 

he 



lG4 VOYAGE IN SEARCH ' [l7Q3- 

he had ftill fufficient courage to walk to the boat, 
Supported only by the arms. 

A few guns loaded with langragc were fired, 
to proted: fuch of us as were on fhore. The na- 
tives fled on all fides, and colieded in very nume- 
rous bodies in different parts of the ifland : and, 
to endeavour to difperfe them, and to bring off 
thofe of our people, who were ftiK in the interior 
of the ifland, a detachment was fent on Ihore well 
armed. 

Several chiefs, affembled clofe by our market 
with fome of us, were rifmg to depart ; but they 
yielded to our invitation not to quit the place. 

Prefently we faw a launch manned and armed 
coming from the Efperance, under the command 
of Trobriant, her Firft-Lieutenant. Knowing very 
little of the occafion of the alarm, and fuppofmg 
that all the natives were preparing to fall upon 
ws, he ordered his party to feize upon* a double 
canoe, jufl as fhe was coming to the Ihore, totally 
igfiorant of all that had paffed . Moff of the natives 
in her immediately leaped into the fea ; but the 
chief, to whom flie belonged, remaining on the 
deck, Trobriant fent one of the crew to feize him. 
On his attempting to ffrike the chief with a club 
the chief difarmed him ; they laid hold of each 
other ; and Trobriant thought proper to fire on 

the 



April.] of la perouse. ^ l55 

the chief^ whom he fliot dcv^d. We were all ex- 
tremely grieved at this misfortune. 

Another native, witneffing what paffed, leaped 
from the canoe's maft-head into the fea, not dar-- 
ing to come down upon deck : and immediately 
a, negro, whom we had taken on board at Am- 
boyna, purfued him with a pike, w'hich he had in 
his hand, but fortunatclv could not overtake him. 

The rage of thcfc barbarians was not yet ap- 
peafed. A marine, by birth a German, whom 
like wife we fliipped at Amboyna, perceiving the 
daughter of the unfortunate chief, who had con- 
cealed herfclf in the bottom of the canoe, had al- 
ready raifed his fabrc to run her through, when a - 
gunner belonging to the Recherche, Citizen Avi-. 
gnon, caught hold 'of the madman's' arm. He - 
then threw himfclf between him and the poor 
girl, whofe mother foon gained the fliore, dif- 
trad:cd at thie death of her hufband. The daugh- 
ter, too, wept bitterly for the lofs of her father,, 
and we faw her beating herfelf violently with the 
fift on the cheeks and brealt. 

We detained as hoftagcs the fon of the king, 
and Titifa, chief of the ifland of Panga'imotoo : 
but we -all remarked w^ith forrow, the dejcd:ion 
into which this confinement threw the king's 
fon, whom we had oftqn feen ilTue his coni- 
mands with fuch haughtinefs to the fubjeds of 

hi J 



1(55 VOYAGE TI^ SEAJICH [l79^* 

his father. He frequently repeated that he was 
our friend, and that he could wifli to accompany 
us to France. Titifa, on the contrary, exprefled 
not the leaft fear. 

Thefe two chiefs fpent the night in the great 
cabin of the Recherche. Each had brought with 
him a wooden pillow, of the fhape of that repre-. 
fentedin Plate XXXIII. Fig. 35, on which, after- 
lying down, they laid the back part of their head, 
according to thecuftom of thefe people, which is 
no doubt the caufe of the very perceptible flat- 
tening obferved in that part. 

During the night we faw a greater number of 
fires oa the north coafl: of Tongataboo, than we 
had ever perceived before. 

The next morning at day-break we were 
awakened by the piercing cries of two women, 
who were making their lamentations, as they 
went round our iliip in their canoe. They cried 
alternately one after the other, no^ doubt that 
their voices might be diftinguiflied by Titifa, who 
knew them immediately. Thefe women were 
his wife and daughter, who, in their grief, beat 
their cheeks and breall with their iifts. He im- 
mediately ran upon deck, but could not quiet 
their alarm, till he had given them an account of 
the good treatment he had received on board : 
and when he told them that he lliould foon re- 
turn 



April.] of la perouse. 167 

turn on fliore, they were tranfported with joy. 
A Ihort time after he and King Toobou's fon 
were both fent alliore in our barge, to the Ifland 
of Pangaimotoo. The wife and daughter ofTi- 
tlfa followed us in their canoe, when, as they 
were paffing clofe by the Efperance, a blunder"^ 
bufs went off by accident, and hit their canoc> 
which they were obliged to quit, as in confe- 
quence the prefently filled. We took them into 
our boat, and exprelTed cur great forrow at this 
mifchance ; but they icon forgot the danger thcj 
had run, for they were with Titifa, and thought 
of nothing more but the pleafure- of feeing hitn. 
fet at liberty. We made them a prefent of a few. 
articles of hardware, among which a hatchet gave 
them great fatisfadlion. Titifa told us, he fliould 
employ this in conllru6ling another canoe, fo that 
he ihould foon repair the lofs he had j lift experi- 
enced. 

When we landed, moft of the natives retired 
from the fhore, and wxre proceeding into the in^- 
terior part of the ifland : but Titifa defired them 
to return, and ordered them to range themfelves 
in a circle, which they immediately did. Out 
trade then recommenced with the greateft order 
imaginable. This chief would not quit us the 
w^hole time ; but Toobou's fon difappeared as foon 
as he fet his foot on fhore. 

The 



lG8 VO^'-AGE Ilf SEARCH [l793. 

The chief, who had been killed the day before 
By Trobriant, appeared to be greatly loved by the 
natives, for feveral difplayed much fenfibility in 
lamenting his death. 

For fear they fliould endeavour to make re- 
prifals on us, the General ordered every perfon 
belonging to our fhips, to remain w^ithin the place 
where the trade was carried on. 

Our Ihips were fufficiently flocked "with all 
fuch provifion as thefe people could furnifh. As 
we had now nothing more to apprehend from 
the confequences of competition, fome articles 
of hardware were diftributed among the crew, 
that they might procure a few things for them- 
felves. On this the natives raifed their demands, 
for their goods to a very high price, frequently 
ajQiing ten times as much as before they had been 
contented to take. 

We faw in their polTcffion an iron hook, v^hich 
they had had fkill enough to form like thofe 
which they fabricate of bone, tortoife-lliell, mo-* 
ther-of-pearl,, and other; animal fiibftances, the 
figure of which may be feen in Plate XXXII, 
Fig. 27 and 28. The line, to which it was fixed, 
was intended, undoubtedly, to fifli in very deep 
water, for a pretty large piece of alabafter, cut 
into a conical Ihape, was failened to it. (Sec Plate 
XXXII, Fig. 25 and 20). 

Titifa 







^J/77,//OC 



April".] of la peroUse, iOq 

Tltifa and feveral other chiefs were not with- 
out anxiety, on account of the hoftile intentions 
of Ibme of the natives toward us. They impart- 
ed to us their apprehenfions, and perfuaded i»s to 
return on board before the clofe of the day ; their 
authority, no doubt, being infufficient to control 
them. 

At night-fall we perceived, that our rudder 
chains had been taken away. 
. 7th. We obferved on Ihore feveral young girls, 
who had cut their hair to the length of an inch, 
except round the head, and afterwards powdered ' 
it with lime, for the purpofe, we were told) of 
making it grow of a light colour. We faw feve- 
ral others, whofe hair was of this complexion al- 
ready. 

Moft of the women did not defift from afking 
us for glafs rings' and beads, with which they 
adorned themlelves, as foon as they obtained them. 
Their requeft was always accompanied with a 
pleafmg fmile, and at the fame time they inclined 
their head, laying. one of their hands on the breaft, 
in the manner reprefentedPlate XXX, Fig. 1. 

Tkifa brousfht us fome nutmegs, which were 
tolerably round, and as large again as thofe of the 
cultivated nutmeg, but they were deftitute of aro- 
matic flavour. The mace w^as covered with a 
pretty thick down. The natives, obferving we 

Vol. II, M received 



170 VOYAGE IN SEARCH ^ [l793, 

received thefe with plcafure, quickly brought us 
more. 

Thefc people have invented a kind of flute, 
differing from that called in Europe Pan's reed 
only in the proportion of the tones. All the pipes 
gave full notes, and of little extent ; and the 
high eft is a fourth to the loweft. We purchafed 
feveral of thefe flutes. 

I obtained of our Commander a large box, to 
hold fome young bread-fruit plants, for the pur- 
pofe of enriching our colonies with that ufeful 
vegetable ; and it was placed upon the larboard 
quarter gallery. Some of the natives procured 
me a great number of fuckers, and I planted them 
in very good mould, which they brought me, and 
which they* called kele kele. I alfo took fome 
roots and cuttings of this valuable tree, w^hich I 
buried in loam, ctimmea in their language, placing 
them horizontally. Thefe cuttings were fo many 
fhoots, which I intended to plant on our arrival 
at the Ifle of France. 

8th. Queen Tine came on board, juft as Feenou 
was in the cabin w ith the General, to whom he 
had brought as a prefent a diadem, made with 
the beautiful red feathers of the tropic-bird, with 
fome other very fmall feathers of a brilliant red 
colour. When he went out of the cabin, to re- 
turn afliore, he endeavoured to avoid the fight of 

the 



April.] of la perouse. 171 

the queen ; but the moment flie perceived him, 
file made him come to her, and held out to him 
her right foot, which he took hold of immedi- 
ately, and placed on the hind part of his head, 
making a profound bow, in teftimony of the re- 
aped: he owed the queen. He dared not refule 
her thefe honours, though it appeared to us, that 
he was deeply affe6led by it. The General had 
juft made him a prefent of feveral iron tools, and 
w^e obferved with pleafure, that he appeared to 
know the value of this metal, giving it a very de- 
cided preference to the bones and volcanic ftones, 
cyf which moft of the hatchets of thefe iflanders 
are made. 

We were afterwards vifited by different chiefs, 
who repeated to us, what feveral others had al- 
ready informed us, refpefting the reigning family. 
They employed for the purpofe playing cards, 
with which we furniihed them. Thefe they firft 
fpread on the table, and then they affigned to 
each the name of one of the perfonsof the fa- 
mily ; w hich did not appear to us to bear one 
common furname, as Captain Cook imagined 
(that of Futtafaihe, at prefent the name of the 
ion of Poulaho) ; for Poulaho's father was named 
Talhouhutou. Taibouloutou married a wife, 
whofe name w^as Toobouhoii, by whom he had 
four children ; two fons, Poulaho^ who fucceeded 

M 2 him. 



172 V.OYAGE IN SEARCH [l793. 

him, and Futtafailie ; and two daughters, the one 
named Tiney the other Nanatchl. When Poul<iho 
died, he left a fon very young, named Futtafailie y 
whofe uncle then took into his hands the reins of 
government: but he did not long furvive his 
brother, and then the fovereignty devolved upon 
Tine, the elder fifter. She held all the honours 
of it, without exercifnig the authority, however ; 
with which it appears a female cannot be invefl- 
ed : the power, therefore, paffed into the hand of 
a chief named Toobou, brother to Tines mother. 
This queen had married Ovea, one of the chiefs of 
Tofoa ; and he had divorced her, after having 
had two fons by her, Vea'icou, and Veatchi. 

Thus it apppears, that the fucceffion to the 
throne devolves firft on the brothers, then on the 
fifters, of the prince who has reigned, before it 
comes to his fons ; and when a woman fucceds 
to the royal title, the fovereign authority is ex- 
ercifed by one of her mother's nearefi: relations, 
though only during the life of the queen. The 
family of Toobou will retain the power during 
the reign of Tine ; and Futtafailie^ the fon of Fou- 
lalio, will not afcend the throne, till after the 
death of both his aunts. The royal family, at 
this time divefled of the fovereign power, never- 
theiefs enjoyed the regal honours, and even re- 
ceived the homage of thofc, by whom the autho- 
rity 



April.] of la peroitse. 173 

rity was exercifed, as we obferved on feveral oc- 
cafions. 

Vouacece, one of the chiefs of Feejee, had ar- 
rived at Tongataboo, foon after we anchored 
there. We were frequently vifited by him, and 
he affirmed to us, what he had fald feveral tifnes, 
that it would take him three days failing, in his 
double canoe, with a fouth-eaft wind, to reach 
Feejee, the fituation of which he pointed out to 
the north- weft. Hence we reckoned, that this 
ifland, which is very lofty, and of the fertility of 
which he boafted. much, was about a hundred 
and fifty leagues from Tongataboo. This is an 
immenfe voyage for people, who, having no in- 
ftruments, fteer only by obferving the fun and . 
ftars with the naked eye, as foon as they are out 
of fight of land : but it is ftill more difficult to 
conceive, how they can reach Tongataboo from 
fuch a diftance, when they have to work up againft 
the fouth-eaft winds ; and they muft be very 
fure of their marks in the heavens, not to mifs 
the land, after being obliged to ply to windward, 
as they are fometimes, for more than a month. 

The people of Tongataboo informed us^ that 
the natives of the Feejee Iflands were cannibals ; 
but Vouacece endeavoured to exculpate himfeif 
from this accufation, by afturing us, that the 
lower clafs of people only, the tottaSf ate human 

M3 iiefti 



174 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l/QS. 

fleih. It appeared to us, however, from what wc 
learned on other occafions, thai; the chiefs ate 
it likewife : indeed, as thefe people eat their ene- 
mies only, and commit this favage a6l folely to 
glut their rage, it may be prefumed the people 
of Tongataboo did not impofe upon us when they 
aflured us that th^ Feejec chiefs themfelves were 
cannibals. 

Unqueftionably the reader will be aftonifhed 
to hear, that, notwdthftanding this mark of fero- 
cioufnefs, the arts are much farther advanced at 
Feejee than at the Friendly Iflands ; the inha- 
bitants of which never failed to inform us that 
the finefl articles they fold us came from Feejee, 
being careful to give us to underfland that they 
were very decidedly fuperior to thofe which they 
fabricated themfelves. 

Vouacece difplayed much greater defire of ac- 
quiring knowledge than any native of the Friendly 
Iflands, moft of whom vifited us folely from mo~ 
tives of intereft, and examined all parts of our fhip 
w^ith the greateft attention. He was very w^ell 
made, and his phyfiognomy w^as ilrikingly exprcf- 
five of charaaer (fee Plate XXIX. Fig. 2). His 
hair, ori the fore-part of the head, was ornamentr 
cA w'th red po>\'der. 

The natives of Feejee arc frequently at war 
"with thofe of Tongataboo ; but, as fooii as hofti- 

Vitics 



npKH^KtKl-K^\«-?>^ 




April.,] of la perouse. 175 

lities are at an end, a great trade is carried on' 
between them. 

The General received as a prcfcnt from Futta- 
faihe a little canoe with an out-rigger, which was 
immediately flowed near the main-chains. It 
was near ten feet long, a foot wide, and capable 
of carrying only two perfons. Thefe canoes are 
decked for about a fifth part of their length at 
each end, which is fufficient for them to navigate 
with fecurity within the reefs ; but their double 
canoes, being intended for the open fea, are 
decked throughout their whole length, except 
toward the middle, where a little opening is left 
for a man to go down and bale out the w^ater 
when it is neceffary. 

I faw with admiration that thefe people had 
confulted nature in conflrudling their canoes for 
fpeed. The bottom nearly refemblcs the under 
part of a £fli of the cetaceous kind, which 
fwlms with the greateft fwiftnefs, darting along 
by bounds on the furface of the water, the del- 
plitnus delphis, the dolphin. 

gth. King Toobou having heard that we were 
foon to quit the ifland, came to Intreat us to 
poflpone our departure, and appeared extremely 
forry when he found us determined to go. 

The natives imagined, no doubt, that we wiflied 
to lay in a great flock of bread-fruit, for they 

M 4 brought 



176 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l 793, 

brought much more than ufual to our market 2 
but this fruit would not keep k:)ng without rot- 
ting, unlefs we had cut it into flices and dried 
it, or fermented it, as the natives do, much in 
the fame manner as is done in Europe with fe- 
veral fpecies of cuHnary vegetables. Ever fmce 
we had been at anchor we had fufficient for our 
daily confamption : and we ate it with pleafure, 
relinquilhing for it without regret our bifcuit, 
and even the fmall allowance o£ frcih bread, 
which was ufually ferved out to us every day, 
though this was of a very good quality. We 
preferred the bread-fruit to yams ; but the na- s 
tives, w^ho came to dine with us, feemed to eat 
them almoil: indifcriminately. Our cook com.- 
monly boiled it for us ; yet it would have tailed 
much better had he taken the trouble to bake it 
in the oven. 

This fruit is nearly of an oval fhape, about a 
foot long, and eight inches thick. The W'hole 
is eatable, except a very thin rind, with which it 
is covered, and a fmall portion at the centre, 
where the cells terminate. Thefe contain no 
feeds, but are full of a very nutritious pulp, eaiy 
of digellion, fufficiently agreeable to the tafte, and 
which w^e always ate with frefh pleafure. 

During eight months of the year this tree pro- 
duces its fruits, which, ripening one after another, 

thus 



April.] of la pERotrss. \yy 

thus afford the natives an abundance of whole- 
fome food. 1 fhall not defcribe it here, as this 
has been done already by ikilful botanifts. The 
want of feeds, no doubt, arifes from propagating 
the tree by fuckers ; and in this refpedl it differs 
remarkably from the wild ipecies, the fruit of 
which is much fmaller, not very numerous, and 
full of large kernels, which are difficult of di- 
geftion. 

The natives brought us a few bits of yellow 
fanders, and to render its fmell more powerful, 
they took care to rub it ftrongly with a rafp made 
of the fkin of the ray, fuch as is reprefented in 
Plate XXXIL Fig. 24. They told us, that they 
procured it from the Feejee Mands, whence they 
■ call it ha'i-fccjee : and they faid that they had fre- 
quently endeavoured to tranfplant fom^e of the 
trees to their own illand, but they could not fuc- 
ceed. 

The canoes round our fliip left us when night 
was coming on, returning to the neareft part of 
the ihore, as was cuftomary ; and our men were 
ftill very merry, wheii the young women, who 
had found means to get between decks, gave 
them notice of their departure, faying to them 
aloud, bo7igut hongiii, m'ltzt ni'itzL Thefc words 
I fhall not attempt to tranflate ; but from the 
vocabulary of the language of thefe people, given 

toward 



178 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [1/93. 

toward the end of the prcfcnt work, it may be 
feen, that the girls were not afhamed to pubUfli 
what had paffed between them and the crew, at 
the fame time that they promifed them to come 
again the next day. 

Early the next morning feveral chiefs came to 
fee us, and announced to the natives, who were 
already alTembled round our vefTel in their ca- 
noes, that we were on the point of quitting their 
ifland : when we were much furprifed to fee a 
number of young women immediately falling 
into tears, and uttering piercing cries. No doubt 
their forrow was very acute, but it was of ihort 
duration ; for foon after we faw them merry 
enough with their companions. 

Futtafaihe requefted us to fharpen for him a 
couple of hatchets, which had been given him 
by Captain Cook, and w^hich he had had reforged 
on board the Efpcrance. This chief was accom- 
panied by his wife, who amufcd herfelf a long 
while by playing with a fort of cup and ball, in- 
vented by thefe iflanders. This toy confifted of 
a ball of wood, which flie threw up into the air, 
and then endeavoured to let fall through a very 
fmall femicircle of fliell, to which the ball was 
faftened by means of a long ftring. We were 
admiring her addrefs, when Futtafaihe, feized 
with a fit of jealoufy at feeing in her hands fome 

prefents 



April.] of la perouse. 179 

pjefents which fhe had jufl received from one of 
our officers, began to abufe her ; and though 
his fufpicions were without foundation, fhe had 
a great deal of difficulty to perfuade him of his 
miftake. This chief was with his father-in-law. 
We made them fome prefents juft as the fon of 
liing Toobou arrived, and they immediately hid 
them in their girdles : but Toobou perceived it, 
and we had foon a frefli proof that if the royal 
family enjoyed the honours of fovcreignty, the 
family of Toobou reaped all its 'profits. Too- 
bou fearched the girdles of the two chiefs, and 
feized every thing they had juft received. Fut- 
tafaihe had no other means of revenge but by 
preventing his eating in his prefcnce, not fuffer- 
ing him to fit by his fide, and placing his foot on 
his head : accordingly he prcfented his foot to 
him foon after, and Toobou paid him the ho- 
mage due to a perfon of fiiperior rank. 

We had many times feen the chiefs openly- 
taking to themfclvcs things that belonged to 
people of the lower clafs ; and we always re- 
marked with furprife that this fpecies of oppref- 
fion by no mcdns diminiflicd the unalterable 
gaiety of their dilpofitions. When they were 
affembled together, you would hear them every 
moment burfi: out into great peals of laughter. 
Their government appeared to us, as it did to 

Captain 



ISO VOYAGE IN SEARCH [^7Q3i 

Captaia Cook, to have a confiderable affinity to 
the feudal fyftem. 

Several natives requefted to embark with us, 
in order to accompany us to France ; and Cap- 
tain Huon allotted a birth on board the Efperance 
to Kove, a ic)n of the queen. This chief, to 
convince us that he was prompted only by the 
wifh to accompany us, would not accept any of 
the articles we offered him. The General, whom 
he came to fee, fet before him the principal in- 
conveniencies attendant on long voyages ; yet he 
perfifted in his refolution, and returned on board 
the Efperance; Juft as- he was fitting down to 
dinner, however, feveral natives came to in treat 
him to go on fhore to fee his family at leaft once 
more, before he undertook a voyage of fuch a 
length. He complied with their intreatics, and 
never returned on board again. Some of the 
natives informed us, that he was unable to refill: 
the prayers and tears of nine wives and feveral 
children, whom he was going to leave, perhaps 
never to fee more ; and that he had promifed 
not to quit them. Kove had a £ne counte- 
nance, but not the gaiety of the other natives. 
Perhaps fome domcftic uneafmefs had been one 
of the chief caiifes of his defire to leave his coun-* 
try. Had he carried his dcfign into execution, 
he would many times have regretted the delicious 

fruits 



April.] of la perouse. 181 

fruits of his native ifle, when reduced, like us, 
to feed on worm-eaten bifcuit. 

At the beginning of the night we fired off ttn 
or a dozen mufkets, and immediately we heard 
the fliouts of a great number of the natives, 
which were repeated froiii different places along 
the Ihore. 

Our ftaj at the Friendly Iflands contributed 
greatly to reftore the health of our crew. We 
found there plenty of vegetables, and laid in a 
great flock. The pork was excellent, which muff 
be attributed in part to the good quality of the 
roots and fruits with which the natives feed 
their hogs. We took on board as many as our 
ffye would contain ; and we were convinced, in 
the fequel, that they could bear a long voyage, 
though Captain Cook informs us that he experi- 
enced the contrary with reipecfl to thofe v>^hich 
he procured at the Friendly Iflands in the different 
vifits he paid them. We purchafed upwards of 
four hundred while we lay at anchor, the greater 
part of w^hich we faked. We adopted the pro- 
cefs recommended by Cook in his third voyage, 
which confifls in ufing a ftrong brine, with a 
fufficient quantity of vinegar to diffolve the fait. 
This -we could do the more eafily, as a great part 
of our wine was turned four. 

A fmali quantity of pork was falted by oiar 

butcher 



1S2 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l^QS, 

butcher with fait alone ; and though under the 
Toiu-id Zone, it kept as well as what we prepared 
after Cook's manner, and tafted even better. 
The fat preferved in the brine made with vine- 
gar was difgufting on account of its extreme foft- 
neis, and it had a very ilrong taftc of the vinegar, 
which no one liked. 

Our coops were filled with fowls. 

During the whole time of our lying at anchor, 
the quickfiiver in the barometer did not rife above 
28 inches tv.'o lines, French meafure, and its va- 
riation was about one line. 

The thermometer in the Ihade on fhore had 
not rifen hisfherthan 25'^ -1-loths, though we felt 
exceffive heat. 

The winds had varied from the fouth-eaft to 
the north-eaft, blowing but faintly. 

Our obfervatory was in 2P 8^ IQ" S. lat., and 
180° 2Q' 38'/ E. long. 

The variation of the needle was 10° E. 

The fpring- tides rofe five feet ; and it was high 
water about half after fix on the days of new and 
full moon. 

From the accounts given us of the fhips that 
had anchored in this archipelago, by very intel- 
ligent natives, we were convinced that La Pe- 
roufe had never put in to any of thefe iflands. 
Befidcs, they ailurcd us, that no accident had 

happened 



April.] of la perouse. 183 

happened to any veflel that had flopped at them, 
except to Bhgh's launch ; the affair of which 
they related without difguife, as I have mention- 
ed above. The indifference with which they 
told us this ftory, convinced us, that if thefe 
people be not naturally ferocious, they are at leafl 
flrangers to fentiments of humanity. The blows 
with clubs, or logs of wood, with which the 
chiefs ufiially accompany their orders, are an ad- 
ditional proof of this. They well remembered 
the different periods at which they had feen Cap- 
tain Cook ; and, to acquaint us with the intervals, 
they reckoned them by harvefls of yams, giving 
two of thefe to each year. Several of the natives, 
particularly thofe of the royal family, onounced 
the name of Cook with enthufiafm : but the great 
feverity of that celebrated navigator had prevented 
many others from bearing him in memory with 
equal plcafure ; they fpoke of him only with com- 
plaints of the rigorous treatment they had experi- 
enced at his hands. In fad;, though in his lafl 
voyage he fpeaks only of one man wounded by 
a ball in the thigh, we faw another who had been 
fhot' through the Ihoulder;* and he allured us 

that 

'* In the account uf Cook's laft voyage, now before me, 
k is exprcfsly faid, that the man was Ihot through the 
flioulder, the ball having entered a little above the inner 

parr 



J84 YOYLGE IN SEARCH [l793. 

that he had received this wound during Cook's 
lafl vifit to Tongataboo. 

The natives of the Friendly Illands are in ge- 
neral tall and well made ; for which they are 
principally indebted, no doubt, to the abundance 
and good quality of their food. The fine ihape 
of thefe people is not degraded by cxccfQve toil. 
Their mufcles being ftrongly marked, we prc- 
famed they muft have great fiirength ; but the 
idle life they lead renders them very little capable 
of great exertion : ' accordingly, w^hen they tried 
their llrength againft our failors, they were al- 
mofh always worfted. 

The men, as well as the women, are accuftom- 
ed to cut off one or tv/o joints of the little linger, 
and fometimes of the finger next to it, in the 
hope of obtaining a cure from fevere difeafes. 

Moft of them are tatooed on all parts of the 
body. We faw a great number, whofe fkin was 
covered with a fcurfy eruption ; which perhaps 
is owing to their not being accuftomed to wipe 
themfelves> or wafli themfelves Vv'ith frefh water, 
after having been into the fea. 

We obferved no fymptoms of the venereal dif- 
eafe among the natives ; one of our feamen, 

part of the collar bone, and pafied out obliquely backward. 
How Labillardiere was led into this miflake, I cannot fay. 
— Tranf.ator. 

however, 



April.] of la perouse. 185 

however, caught a gonorrhoea there, but from a 
woman, who had kept company with a man be- 
longing to the Efperance, that had long laboured 
under the complaint. Have thefe people been 
fortunate enough, for the difeafe to have become 
naturally extindl among them, after having run 
through its feveral ftages with ^-apidity ? fmce, 
from the teftimony of Captain Cook, there can 
be no doubt but it has formerly made great ra- 
vages in thefe ifland^. 

The fkin of the people of the Friendly Illands 
is tawny, becaufe they frequently expofe them- 
felves to the heat of the fun ; but the women, 
who remain pretty conftantly within doors, or in 
the ihade of their trees, have very fair com- 
plexions. The countenances of the w^omen are 
in general very pleafmg, and highly animated ; 
and the good ftate of health they enjoy is parti- 
cularly owing to their extreme cleanlinefs, and 
the good quality of their diet. 



Vol. II. N CHAP. 



185 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l793. 



CHAP. XIII. 

Departure from Totigatahoo—TVe get S.\ght of the 
Southern Part of the Archlpehgo of the Tierra., 
del Efpirttu Santo, fNezv Hebrides J — Difcoverj^ , 
of the IJland of Beaupre-^-We Anchor at New . 
Caledonia — Interviews with the Natives — De- 

fcrtptlon of their Huts — Thefe Savages are Cafi- 
iilbals — Their Impudeiice toward lis- — Thejy eat 

great Pieces, of Steatite, to appeafe their Hunger 
— Phelr Attempts tofel%e upo?i our Boats— Df- 

ferent 'Excurfions Into the Interior Part of the 
IJland — -Death of Captain Pluon — New Species 
of Spider, on which the Savages of New CaledG- 
nlafeed. 

loth APRIL. 

ABOUT feYcn in the morning we got under 
way, with a pretty frefli breeze from the 
eail-fouth-eaft, and fteered for an hour from 
north-weft by fouth to north, and afterward 
north by eaft, paffing out through a channel to- 
ward the north of our anchoring place, which 
had been examined by Citizen Legrand. 

In this channel we found by the lead from five 
fathoms and a half to nine fathoms water. 
Some of the natives followed us in their ca- 
noes, 



April.] of la perousIe. Ig; 

iioes, exprefling great regret at our quitting their 
ifland. They cried out from all parts, offa, offa 
Palangois, at the fame time giving us marks of 
their regard. 

' We foon 8;ot ahead of the canoes that w^re 
paddled along ; but thofe with fails were obliged 
to flacken their rate of going, to keep at a fliort 
diftance from us ; and we had an opportunity 
of bbferving, that they would have taken the 
lead of our vefTcls confiderably, if they had avail- 
ed themfelves of the whole force of the breeze : 
this advantage, however, they would fbon have 
loft, if the wind had been ftronger, and the water 
lefs fmooth. As foon as we got into the open fea, 
they defifted from keeping us company any far- 
ther. We were then more than two leagues 
from the anchoring place we hadjuft quitted, 
and we fet the weft end of Attata, bearing fbuth 
48° weft. 

At this time we had a gra^xlly bottom, with 
twenty -two fathoms and a half of water. 

nth. The next day, about five in the after- 
noon, we made Tortoife Ifland, bearing from ms 
north-weft by north. 

On the lOth, about feven o'clcfck in the even- 
ing, the Efpcrance made a fignal for feeing land 
weft 18'' north, about eight leagues diftance. 
This was Erronan, the eaftcrnmoft of the iilands 

N 2 of 



188 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l793. 

of the archipelago of Efpiritu Santo, difcovered 
by Quiros in ]6o6. A little before noon the 
ifland of Annaton was in fight, diftant ten leagues^ 
fouth weft by foiith. 

It was five in the afternoon when we made the 
ifland of Tanna, bearing wxft lO^ north. Pillars 
of fmoke ilTued from its volcano, and fpread 
abroad in the air, forming clouds, which rofe at 
firft to a prodigious height, and which, after hav- 
ing traverfed an immenfe fpace, funk lower as 
they grew cooler. During the night we enjoyed 
the brilliant fpcdiacle of thefe clouds, illumined 
by the vivid light of the burning matter, which 
was thrown out from the bowels of the volcano 
at intervals. 

18th. We were fteerlng wefterly, the wind 
blowing very frefh from the eaft, when, about 
half after three in the morning, Dumerite, the 
officer on the watch, heard the fcreams of a flock 
of fea-fowl pafling very clbfe by our fhip: appre- 
henfive that we were near fome of the rocks, 
which commonly ferve them as a retreat, he 
thought it advifable to bring to, and wait for 
day- light to continue our courfe : and as foon 
as day broke, we faw a very little way to leeward 
o{ us fome reefs of rocks ftretching a great way, 
on which our fhip muft inevitably have ftruck, if 
this fortuitous occurrence had not given us no- 
tice 



April.] of la perouse. I89 

tice to ftop our courl'e in time. In fa(^, as the 
night was extremely dark, it would have been 
impoffible to have feen the breakers foon enough 
to avoid them: befides, the. wind blowing very 
frefh, the fea ran fo high all round us, that v/e 
could not foon enough have diftinguilhed the 
waves that broke on the reefs from the reft. 
Beyond thefe reefs, and near two leagues dif- 
tant from them, we faw an ifland, which bore, 
when we made it, fouth 28° well, and to vvhich I 
gave the name of Citizen Beaupre, engineer-geo- 
grapher to our expedition. This ifland lies in the 
latitude of 20° 14' fouth, longitude iQs"" 47' eaft. 
It is very low, and about 1500 toifes long. We 
afterwards difcovered fome rocks bearing fouth 
-21° eaft ; and a little while after fome others to- 
wards the fouth. 

It is to be remarked, that the currents fet us 
to the north about twenty- four minutes a day, 
W'hen we were near Tierra del Efpiritu Santo, and 
pafling between that archipelago and new Cale- 
donia. Undoubtedly this is owing to the pofition 
of the land, which, while it changes the direction 
of the currents determined by the general winds, 
increafes their ftrength. 

About one o'clock in the afternoon we got 

iight of the high mountains of New Caledonia to 

the fouth- weft; and at half-after four we wxre 

N 3 - within 



igO VOTAGE IN SEARCH [l 7QS, 

within a thoufand toifes of the reefs bordering 
that illand. The foot of the mountains on this 
iide are waihed by the fea, and they are Hkewife 
more ftecp here than on the weftern ihore, which 
we coafted along the year before. 

We faw a fine cafe ad e, the water of which, 
after having difappeared fevcral times in deep 
gullies, came tumbling into the feaV and we 
admired the picturefque efff6t of the torrents, 
which we perceived toward the fouth-wefl", their 
waters white with foam producing an agreeable 
contrail to the dufky verdure of th^fe high lands. 
During the night we continued plying to 
windward, endeavouring to maintain our ftation 
againft the currents, that we might be i;i a fitua-: 
tion to come to an anchor the next day. 

IQth. As foon as day-light appeared we ap- 
proached vyitliin 800 toifes of the reefs, along 
which we ran, in order to find the opening 
through which we were to reach the anchoring 
place ; but it blew very hard from the fouth- 
fouth-eafl, and we had already fallen to leeward, 
when we diftinguilhed the opening in the reefs. 
Though we were pretty near the ihore, we did 
not perceive Qbfervatory Ifland, which left us for 
fomc time doubtful whether we were oppofite 
the place where Captain Gook anchored in 177^; 
and accordingly we put about, to get more to the 

the 



APllIt.] OF LA PERGUSE. IQI 

the nofth-eaft. At noon we found by our obfef- 
vations, that we mull be near Obfervatory Ifland, 
and it was not long before we got fight of it, 
thoup'h it is extremely low ; when we immedi- 
ately bore away for the anchoring place. In the 
opening between the reefs we had from eleven fa- 
thotn water to thirteen and a half, but when wc 
got within them we had only from feven fa- 
thoms to eight and a half. 

A double canoe immediately came failing out 
to us. She had on board eleven natives, whofe 
manoeuvres gave us no very high idea of their 
ikill in navigation. They fpoke to us, and fliowed 
us fome pieces of white fluff, which they waved 
in the air, flill keeping more than a hundred toifes 
from the fhip. A fliort time after they returned 
on fliore. * v 

The Efperancc, being a little to windward of 
us, grounded on a flioal, w hich we in confequence 
took care to avoid, and prefently after let go our 
anchor, in order to lend her affiilance. General 
Dentrecafteaux immediately fent our long-boat 
to her, and at eight o'clock in the evening wc 
had the agreeable news that flie was again alioat, 
and had received no damage. 

20th. At fun-rife the next morning we law 
four canoes under fail, coming towards our fhipsj 
When they got very near us, they feemed to be 

N 4 xiiider 



192 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l793, 

under fome fears : but one of the favages, hav- 
ing yielded to our invitations, and come on board, 
was followed by alnaoft all the reft. We were 
furprifed, to find them fet more value on our 
fluffs than on our nails, or even hatchets, which 
they called togni ; a name much refembling that 
given them at the Friendly Iflands, though they 
do not fpeak the fame tongue, as may be feen by 
the vocabularies of the languages of thefe people, 
at the end of the prefent work. We could not 
doubt, however, but they were acquainted with 
iron, which they defignated to us by the deno- 
mination of pii'iou ; but the very hard ftones 
which they ufe, renders it of lefs importance to 
them, than to many other inhabitants of the 
South Sea Iflands. 

We Ihowed them fome cocoas and yams, and 
requefted them to bring us fome : but, far from 
.going to fetch any for us, they wanted to buy 
ours, offering us in exchange their fpears and 
clubs, and giving us to underftand that they were 
very hungry, putting their hands to their bellies, 
whicih were extremely flat. They expreffed fome 
fear on feeing the pigs which we had on board, 
which led us to fuppofe that they had no fuch 
animal ; though Captain Cook had left tw^o, a 
boar and fow, with one of their chiefs. As foon 
as they faw our poultry, however, they imitated 

the 



April.] of la perouse. iqs 

the crowing of the cock tolerably well, fo as to 
leave us no doubt that they had fowls on their 
ifland. 

None of the women in the canoes confented 
to come on board our velTel ; and when we were 
defirous of making them a prefent of any thing, 
the men took it to carry to them. 

Thefe favages came in double canoes of the 
ihape reprefented in Plate XLV. Fig. 1. Their 
maft was fixed at an equal diilance from the two 
canoes, and toward the fore part of the platform, 
by which they were joined together. They are 
not fo fkilfully conftruded as thofe of the 
Friendly Iflands, to which they are much in- 
ferior in point of failing. One of them^ running 
againil: our fhip with too much force, received fo 
much damage, that the canoe on one fide foon 
filled. The favages in her immediately got upon 
the other, and let themfelves go with the current, 
which drifted them toward the fhore. The other 
canoes left us prefently after, and failed after her, 
in order to give her aiTiilance. 

21 ft. Early in the morning we manned the 
capftan, in order to warp our fhip nearer to Ob- 
fervatory Ifland ; for which purpofe wc had car- 
ried out feveral hawfcrs tied end to end ; but they 
gave way feveral times, and obliged us to let go 
the anchor again. 

Wc 



154 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [17Q3. 

We were furrounded by canoes, the natives in 
•which came on board our fhip, and fold us fe-^ 
veral articles, fuch as are delineated in Plates 
XXXYII and XXXVIII. Some of them had 
a few cocoa-nuts and lugar-canes, which they 
would not part with by any means, though we 
offered a great price for them. 

Thefe favages were all naked, except that they 
wrapped their privities in pieces of coarfe fluff, 
iBsdc of bark, or in large leaves of trees. Their 
hair is woolly ; and their fkin is nearly of as deep 
a black as that of the -inhabitants of Diemen*s 
Cape, whom they very much refemble in the gc- 
Qcral caft of their countenance. Several of them 
had their heads bound round with a little net, the 
meflies of which were large. We obferved with 
furprife, a great many, who, defirous, no c^oubt, 
^of having the appearance of long hair, had faftened 
to their own locks two or three treffes, . made 
with the leaves of fome plants of the grafs kind, 
and covered with the hair of the vampire bat, 
which hung down to the middle of their backs. 

Moft of thefe iflanders, armed with fpears and 
^lubs, carried at their waifk a little bag full of 
ftones, cut into an oval fliape, which they throw 
with flings. (See Plates XXXV and XXXVIIL 
Fig. iG, 17, -and 18.) The low^er lobe of their 
cars, perforated with a very large hole, hung down 




CWec/71 ,y' f/ie ,ya i-^iKie^' (y^\ leer Ca/ea(V^t('a . 

Jiti^ bjI.StocJtdaU.RiraMliy, AS *.J/!Ti!./,fpO . 



cW^cfy <y^^^^ ^'^ f^Az't/tZ^^^ c^'.yve/z'^ Ca/e^t 




^c/cci^ c^iAe ^/(za'^^.M oi^t^Ae^t' C<x/^<^<m,^Wj2 



-Rtii' irJ.Ai>einicUt^'em^iay /j!*A/^nl./4VO. 




f^('/ii(t/i <>/'( !<■(/' C a/r(XO?u<x . 



n-AJ A., /^ IV i~J^I. R~.x.,A//i. /<»■ Jn 



April.]- of la perouse. 195 

to their fhoulders.^ Into thefe holes fome had 
introduced leaves of trees, others a piece of wood, 
to ftretch them bigger. Several had this lobe 
jagged ; perhaps from having been torn, either 
in battle, or in running through the woods. 

Behind the ears of one of thefe favages we ob- 
ferved tubercles of the fhape of a veal fweetbread, 
and half as big as a man's fift. He appeared well 
pleafed at feeing us examine this ornament, the 
growth of which he had effected by means of a 
cauftic, by which the parts, no doubt, muft have 
been greatly irritated for a conilderable time. 

The women had no other garment than a kind 
of fringe, made of the filaments of the bark of 
trees, which fervcd them as a girdle, paffing fe- 
yeral times round the waift (See Plate XXXVI). 

The canoes kept thcmielves clofc by our Ihip, 
by means of different ropes, which we had thrown 
out to them. Each of them, however, had a 
Jarge ilone, to ferve as an anchor, faftened to a 
long rope, but they did not make ufe of thefe on 
the prefcnt occafion. 

22d. The next day we got up our anchor at iix 
p' clock in the morning, and made feveral ftretches 
to get nearer to Obfervatory Ifland, which the 
natives call by the name of Ptidyoua. At half af- 
ter ten, when we brought up, this ifland was not 
above 500-toifes diilaat ta the caft 3^ 15^ ibuth. 

We 



ig6 ' VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l7Q3. 

We faw the land of New Caledonia from eaft 1 9° 
30^ fouth, to weft 12^ north, from the neareft 
ihorc of which we were only 590 toifes. The 
inhabitants now had no occafion for their canoes 
to come to us ; moft of them fwam to the Ihip, 
with the articles which they wifhcd to fell. 

I ought not here to omit a malicious trick, 
which had nearly caufed the lofs of the young 
bread-fruit trees, that I had brought from the 
Friendly Iflands. I had watered them in the 
evening ; but, feeing fome drops of water early 
in the morning trickle from the box in which 
they were planted, I had no doubt, but fbme one 
had watered them long after me. Of this I was 
fully convinced, the moment I taft-ed the water, 
that filtered through the mould ; for it was fait. 
The inquiries I made to difcover the perfon who 
had been guilty of this trick, were in vain. 

About one in the afternoon we went afliore, 
and were foon furrounded by a great number of 
the natives, who juft came out of the middle of 
the wood, into which we had entered feveral 
times, though ftill keeping near the lliorc. We 
prefently found a few fcattered huts, three or four 
hundred paces diftant from each other, and 
overfliadowcd by a few cocoa trees. Soon after 
we came to four, which formed a little hamlet, 
in one of the gloomieft parts of the foreil. They 

were 



April.] * of la perouse. 1971: 

were all nearly of the fhape of beehives, a toife 
and a hall in height, and as much in breadth, 
(See Plate XXXVIII, Fig. 28, 29, 3o). • .. 

Figure 28 reprefents one of theie huts, fur- 
rounded by a palifade a yard and a half high, made 
with the limbs of the cocoa tree, arranged pretty 
clofe to each other,, and three feet and hiilf from 
the borders of the hut. A little walk w^as formed 
in the fame manner before the door. 

We afterwards faw feveral huts which were not 
furrounded by palifades (See Fig. 29). The door, 
which was about a yard high, and half a yard wide, 
was fometimes clofed by means of a piece of a 
limb of the cocoa-tree, the folioles of which were, 
interlaced. Several of thefe doors had two pofts, 
made of planks, at the upper extremity of each 
of which a man's head wasxudely carved. The 
lower part of thefe huts was erected perpendi- 
cularly to the height of a yard, where they tapered 
oft in a pretty regular cone, terminated by the 
upper end of a poil that w^as fixed in the centre 
of the floor. 

Figure 30 reprefents the infide of thefe huts. 
The frame ccnfifls of poles, bearing againll the 
upper end of the pcfl, which may be feen rifmg 
from the middle of the floor, and which is near 
three inches in diameter at the bottom. A few 
pieces of wood bent to an arch, render thefe little 

habitations 



igg VdTAGE m sEARcii [1793. 

' habitations fufficiently ftrong. They are covered 
with ftraw to the thicknefs of two or three inches.- 
The floor, on whi.ch the natives are perfe6lly ihel- 
tered from the v^reather, is fpread w^ith mats. 
But the mofchettoes are fo troublcfome, that they 
are obhged to hght fires to drive them away when 
they go to llcep ; and as there is no vent for the 
• fnioke, except at the door, they muft be extremely 
incommoded by it. 

In general there is a board w^ithin the hut on 
one fide, faflened with cords in a horizontal po- 
lition, about a yard from the ground. This fhelfy 
however, can iiipport nothing of much weight, 
for the cords are very flight. 

Near fome of their dwellings we faw little hil- 
locks of earth, twelve or fourteen inches highy 
•with a very open treillis in the middle, of the 
height of two or three yards. The favages called 
thefe 7ih<}uety and informed us that they were 
graves ; inclining the head on one fide, while 
they fiipported it with the hand, and clofing the 
eyes, to exprefs the repofe enjoyed by the remains 
of thofe who were there depofited. 

On returning toward the place w^here we land- 
ed, we found more than fevcn hundred natives, 
who had run thither from all parts. They afked 
■Qs for fluffs and iron in exchange for their efFedis, 
ajod fame, of them foon convinced us that the)f 

were 



April.] of la perouse. igg 

were very audacious thieves. Among their dif- 
ferent tricks I Ihall relate one which thefe knaves 
played nie. One of them offered to fell me a 
little bag, which held ftoncs cut into an oval 
(hape, and which was faftened to his waifb. He 
untied it, and held it out as if ready to deliver 
it to me with one hand, while he received the . 
price agreed upon with the other ; but at the very 
inftant another favage, who haft pofted himfelf 
behind me, gave a great fcream, which made me 
turn my head round, and immediately the rogue 
his comrade ran away with his hag and my things, 
endeavouring to conceal himfelf in the crowd. 
We were unwilling to punilh him^, though moft. 
of ua were armed with firelocks. It was to be 
feared, however, that this ad: of forbearance woul^ 
be confidered as a mark of weaknefs by the na.- 
tLves^ and render them ftill more infolent. What 
happened, foon after feemcd to confirm this : feve^ 
ral of them Vv^ere {o bold as to throw ftones at aa 
officer, who was not above two hundred paces 
from us. We would not yet treat them with 
fevcrity ; for Vy'e Vv'ere fo much prejudiced in their 
favour, firom the account given of them by For- 
fter,,that more fadrs were necefiary to deftroythe- 
good opinion we entertained of the gentlenefs of 
their difpofitions : but we had foon inconteftable 
proofe of their ferodoufiiefs. One of them hav- 
ing 



200 VOYAGE IN SEARCH Xr793. 

ing In his hand a bone frefh roafted, and devour- 
ing the remainder of the flefh ftill adhering to it, 
came up to Citizen Piron, and invited him to 
fhare his repaft. He, fuppofmg the favage was 
offering him a piece of fome quadruped, accepted 
the bone, on which nothing but the tendinous 
parts were left ; and, having fhow n it to me, I 
perceived that it belonged to the pelvis of a child 
of fourteen or fifteen years of age. The natives 
around us pointed out on a child the fituation 
of this bone ; confeffed, without hefitatlon, that 
tjie flefh. of it had furnifhed fome one of their 
countrymen with a meal ; and even gave us to 
tinderfland, that they confidered it as a dainty. 

This difcovery made us very uneaf}^ for thofe 
of our people, who were flill in the woods : fliortly 
after, however, we had the pleafure to find our- 
felves all affembled together in the fame fpot, and 
no longer feared that fome of us w^ould fall vic- 
tims to the barbarity of thefe iflanders. 

When we got on board our^fhip, being furprifed 
at feeing none of the favages there, we were in- 
formed that there had been a great many, but 
that they had been driven away becaufe they had 
ftolen fevcral things. Moft of them had made 
off in their canoes ; and the refi; had jumped into 
the fea and fwam afhore : two, however, were 
returned on board, not being able to fwim fafl 

enough 



April.] op la perouse. 201 

enough to join the others, whether owing to fome 
bodily infirmity, or to their having leaped into 
the fea too long after the departure of their boats 
to be able to take refuge in them. As, the fun 
was already fet, and they were cold, they went to 
warm themlelves at the fire in our cook-room. 

The moil: part of thofe who belonged to our 
expedition, and who had remained on boards 
would not give credit to our recital of the bar- 
barous talle of thofe ifianders, not being able to 
perfuade themfelves that people, of whom Cap- 
tains Cook and Forftcr had given fo favourable an 
account, could degrade themfelves by fuch a hor- 
rible prad:ice ; but it was not very difficult to 
convince the moft incredulous. I had brought 
with me a bone which had already been picked, 
and which our Surgeon-Major faid was the bone 
of a child. I prefented it to the two natives whom 
we had on board. One of thoie cannibals imme- 
diately feized it with avidity, and tore with his 
teeth the fmews and ligaments which yet re- 
mained. I gave it next to his companion, who 
found fomething more to pick from it. 

The different figns which our people made, 
in order to obtain an avowal of the prad:!ce of 
eating human flelh, be^g aukwardly made, oc- 
cafioned a very great miftake. An exceffive ccn- 

VoL. 11. O fternation 



202 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [^7Q3. 

fternation was inftantly vifible in all their features'; 
doubtlefs bccaufe they thought that we alio were 
men-eaters, and, imagining that their laft hour 
was come, they began to weep. We did not fuc- 
ceed in convincing them entirely of their miflake, 
by -all the figns we could make of our abhorrence 
of fo terrible a pradiice. One of them made a 
precipitate retreat through a port-hole, and held 
faft by one of the ropes of the mizen maft fhrouds, 
ready to leap into the fea ; the other jumped into 
the water at once, and fwam to the mofl diftant 
of the boats aftern of our veffel ; they were not 
long, however, before « they recovered from their 
fear, and rejoined our company. 

The fmall llream, where Captain Cook had 
taken in water when he touched at this place, 
w^as dry when we vifited it : we found, however, 
a fmall watering place to the fouth-weft of our 
vefTel, about three hundred paces diftant from 
the fea : the water was very good, but it was 
rather difficult to be come at, and the refervoir 
w^hich furniflied it fcarcely fupplied enough to 
iill once in a day cafks fufficient to load the 
long-boat of each ftiip^, {a that it was necefl'ary 
to wait till next day till more was collctSed to 
replenilTi them. 

We found very near this w^atering place the 

rufty 



April.] of la perouse. 2o3 

tufty. bottom of an iron candleftick, "which pro- 
bably had lain there ever fince 1/74, when Cap- 
tain Cook anchored in this road. 

23d. The next morning we went on fliore at 
the fiearcft landing place, where we found a num- 
ber .of favages who were already taking fome re- 
frelhment. They invited us to join them in 
eating fome meat jufl broiled, which we diftin- 
guiflied to be human flcfli. The fkin which yet 
remained, preferved its form and even its colour 
on feveral parts. They lliewed us they had juft 
cut that piece from the middle of the arm, and 
they gave us to underftand, by very expreffive 
figns, that after having pierced with their darts 
the perfon of whofe limbs we faw ■ the remnants 
in their hands, they had dilpatched him with 
their clubs. They no doubt wiflied to make us 
fenfible that they only eat their enemies, and in^ 
deed it was not poflible that we fhiould have found 
fo many inhabitants in this country, if they had 
had any other inducement but that of hunger to 
make them devour each other. We went to 
the fouth-fouth-weft, and foon crolTed a country 
which hes rather low, where we favv fome 
plantations of yams and potatoes ; we then came 
to the foot of fome mountains, where we found 
ten of the inhabitants who joined our company. 
They foon began to climb up trees of the fpecies 

O 2 called 



204 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l793. 

called hyhjfcus ttliaceus, the youngeil fprouts of 
which they pulled off and immediately chewed, 
in order to fuck the juice contained in the bark. 
Others gathered the fruit of the cord'ia fehejlina, 
which they eat even to the kernel. We did not 
expe6l to fee cannibals content themfelves with 
fo frugal a repaft. 

The heat was exceffive, and we had not yet 
found any water. We followed a hollow track, 
in which we remarked the traces of a torrent of 
vyater in the wet feafon. The verdure of the un- 
derwood, which we perceived a little farther off 
on its borders, gave us hopes of finding a fpring 
to quench our thirll ; in fad: we were no fooner 
arrived than we faw a very limpid ftream iffuing 
from an enormous rock of freeflone, and after- 
wards filling a large cavity hollowed out in a 
block of the fame fort of ftone. Here we halted, 
and the natives, who accompanied us, fat down 
by us. We gave them bifcuits, which they 
devoured with avidity, though they were very 
much worm-eaten, but they would not even taflc 
our cheefe, and we had nothing eatable befides to 
offer them. 

They preferred the water ot the reiervoir to 
wine or brandy, and drank it in a manner which 
afforded us no fmall entertainment, inclining the 
head at about two feet diftance above the furface 

of 



April.] of la perouse. 205 

of the water, they threw it up againft their faces 
with their hands, opening their mouths very 
wide, and catching as much as they could ; thus 
they foon quenched their thirft. It may eafily be 
conceived, that even the moft expert at this me- 
thod of drinking muil; wet the greateft part of 
their bodies. As they difturbed our water, .we 
begged them to go lower down to drink, w^hich 
requeft they immediately complied with. 

Some of them approached the moft robuft 
amongfl us, and, at different intervals, prefled 
with their fingers the moft mufcular parts of their 
arms and legs, pronouncing rapareck with an air 
of admiration, and even of longing, which rather 
alarmed us, but upon the whole they gave us no 
caufe for difTatisfacftion. 

I obferved in thefe places a number of plants 
belonging to the fame genera with many of thofe 
I had collected in New Holland, although the 
two countries are at very great diftance from each 
other. 

We faw with furprize, about a third part of the 
afcent up the mountain, fmall walls raifed one 
above another, to prevent the rolling down of the 
ground which the natives cultivated. I have 
found the fame practice extremely general 
amongfl the inhabitants of the mountains of Afia 
Minor. 

3 It 



206 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l7 93 

It is not a common pra61:lce amongft the fa- 
vagcs of New Caledonia to m'ake an incifion in 
the prepuce ; neverthelcfs, out of fix of them, 
■whom we perfuaded to fatisfy our curiofity in 
that refped;, we found one who had it Hit in a ■ 
longitudinal direction on the upper fide. 

When wc bad reached the middle of the 
mountain, the natives who followed would have 
perfuaded us not to go any f irther, and informed 
us that the inhabitants on the other fide of this 
ridge would' eat us, y:c. however, perfilted in 
afcending to the top, for we were fuffici-ntly 
armed to be under no apprehenfion of danger from 
thcfe cannibals. Thofe who accompanied us 
were, without doubt, at v\'ar with the others,, for 
they would not follow us any farther. 

The mountains which we afcended rife in the 
form ot an amphitheatre, and are a continuation 
of the great chain w^hich runs the whole length 
of the ifland. Their perpendicular height is 
about 2,500 feet above the level of the fea. We 
oblerved them rife gradually to the eaft-fouth- 
eall, till they terminated in a very high mountain 
about three miles from bur moorings. 

The chief component parts of thofe moun- 
tains are quartz, mica, and fteatite, of a fofteror 
harder qualitv, fchorl of a green colour, granite, 
iron ore, &c. 

On 



April.] of la perouse. 207 

On our dcfcent from thefe mountains, we flop- 
ped at the bottom in the midft of fcveral famiHes 
of favages ailemblcd in the neighbourhood of 
their huts, to whom we fignified a defire to 
quench our thirft with the water of the cocoa 
nuts ; but as this fruit is rather fcarce in that part 
of the illand, they confulted together for a conr 
fiderable time before they agreed to fell us any. 
At laft one of their number went to pull a few 
from the top of one of the higheft trees, in order 
to bring them to us. We were extremely fur- 
prifed at the rapidity with which he afcended, 
holding the body of the tree with his hands, he 
ran along the whole length of it, almoft with as 
much eafe and celerity as if he had been walking 
on an horizontal plain, I never before had oc- 
cafion to admire fuch agility amongft any of the 
other iflanders whom we had vifited.' 

The fea water frequently waflied the foot of 
the tree irom which our cocoa nuts were taken, 
fo that the liquor with which they were filled was 
fbmewhat four, but we drank it, being extremely 
thirfty. The children o{ thefe favages waited till 
we had emptied the water of the cocoa nuts, 
when they begged tUem ot us, finding means to 
get fomething more from them. They tore with 
their teeth the fibrous covering of thefe young 
fruits, of Vs'hich the nuts were fcarccly formed, 

O h and , 



• 208 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l 703. 

and then eat the tender part enclofed in it, which 
was much too bitter for our palates. 

When we arrived on board, we learned that 
two of the ifianders had that morning carried off 
from an officer of our veiTfil (Bonvouloir) a uni- 
form cap and a fabre, while he was oc<:upied orr 
Ihore making fome aftronomical obfervations, al- 
though the failors, who had landed with him, had 
traced upon the fand a large circle round the 
place of' obfervation, which they had forbidden 
the favages to enter ; but two thieves having 
concerted their enterprife, advanced with preci- 
pitation behind the officer who had jufl fat down, 
and placed his fabre underneath him. One of 
them feized his cap, and the inflant he rofe up to 
purfue him, the other ran away with his fabre. 
This bold manoeuvre was certainly not their firfl 
^attempt. 

Night approached, all our boats were; already 
alongfide, yet two officers (Dewelle and Wil- 
laumez;) w^ere flill on fhore, with two of the 
. fliip's ere w, but they foon arrived on the beach, 
followed by a great number of the inhabitants. 
The General's boat was inftantly difpatched to 
bring them on board. They told us that the fa- 
vages, w^ho had crowded around thecn, to the 
number of above three hundred, upon obferving 
that all our boats had cjuitted the fliore, had be- 
have d 



April.] of la perouse. 200 

haved in the moft audacious manner. One of* 
them having wrefted his fword from Dewelle, the 
latter attempted to purfue tl^e thief, bnt the 
others immediately raifed their clubs in his de- 
fence. All of our people were robbed with the 
greateft effrontery, but when our boat arrived, 
tw^o chiefs, who probably had prevented the fa- 
vages from proceeding to greater extremities, 
be2[;ged leave to embark in it. They carried two 
fmall parcels offugar-cane and cocoa-nuts to the 
General, who made them in return a prefent of 
an axe, and feveral pieces of ftufF. Thofe chiefs, 
whom they called Theahouma in their language, 
wore on their head bonnets of a cylindrical form^ 
adorned with feathers, fhells, &c. (See Plate 
XXXVII, Fig. 1 ft and 2d.) but as they were open 
at top, they were no covermg from the rain. 

It was not long before a double canoe, difpatch- 
edfrom the fliore, came to convey the chiefs back 
again. It w^as night before they departed, and 
the favages on fliorc had lighted a fire on a fand- 
bank to warm themfelves. We went alhore on 
the 25th with thofe of the crew who were ap- 
pointed to recruit our ftock of wood, which they 
cut at a place 500 yards diltant from where we 
had watered. 

We did not ftray far from our wood-cutters, 
for we w ere but few in number, and the defigns 

of 



210 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [1/03. 

of the natives appeared to us very fufpicious. 
About nine in the morning they took poileffion 
of ourfhallop which was anchored near the coaft, 
and only guarded by one man. They Mere al- 
ready dragging it towards the ftrand, in order to 
carry off the effects tliat were in it with' the 
greater eafe, when another boat's crew came to 
its relief; but the thieves did not give up their 
enterprifc till they were on the point of being 
lired upon. 

LafTeny having gone on fhore to make fome 
aftronomical obfervations, was obliged to re-em- 
bark almofl: immediately, being unable to keepf 
off a number of favages who feemed inclined to 
attempt the feizure of the inftruments, although 
he w^as armed and accompanied by 'two affiftants, 
befides feveral of the boat's crew. 

The mailer gunner of the Efperance, while 
'hunting in the foreft, perceived about noon, in a 
large open fpace not far from the w^ood- cutters, 
above two hundred natives, who were pradifmg 
themfelves in throwing their darts, and different 
exercifes. He retired unperceived, and haffcned 
to relate to us what he had juft witneffed. One 
of the officers of our vclfcl immediately went 
with four fufilecrs to obfcrve the motions of the 
favages ; who, on perceiving them, advanced,- and 
obliged them to make a precipitate retreat to- 
wards 



April.] of la pekouse. 211 

wards the wood-cutters. The favages fbon re- 
paired thither like wife ; and we were not long 
before we difcovered the dcfign they had formed 
of feizing our axes, which had been laid in a 
heap in the midft of our workmen, who were af- 
fctjblcd to take fome rcfrefhment. The com- 
. manding officer infiaiitly gave orders for thofb 
tools to be carried into the long boat ; but the 
failor who attempted it was alTailed by the iflan- 
ders, who were on the point of carrying them off, 
when feveral mufquet fliots were fired. One of 
the moft audacious, who fci] on that occafion, had 
ftill ftrengtli enough to crawl as far as the wood. 
The others retired immediately, and faluted us 
with a fhower of ftones from their flings. The 
ftones, which tliey carried in fmall bags fufpended 
from their belts, ^vere cut into an oval form ; but 
they did not wound any one dangeroufly, on ac- 
C(^unt of the great diltance ; befides, moft of . 
them were ftoppthd by the branches of the trees, 
behind which the natives had taken refuge. This 
is not 'always the cafe when they fight among 
themlelves ; for being then probably lefs afraid 
to advance, they frequently have their eyes bea,t 
out in thefc battles, as feveral of the inhabitants, 
who had loft one of them, informed us. When 
they difcharge the ftones from their flings they 
only make' half a turn with them above their 

heads 



212 VOYAGE IX SEARCH [j 793. 

heads, which is done with as much expedition 
as if thrown with the hand. Thefe ftones, cut 
from a fteatite of coniiderable hardnefs, are very 
fmooth, for which reafon the favages take the 
precaution to wet them with their fpittle, to pre- 
vent their Aiding from the ^ two fmall cords of 
which the bottoms of their flings are formed. 

The different movements of thefe favages hav- 
ing been perceived from on board the Recherche, 
the General ordered two cannon-fliot to be fired 
on them, which made them immediately difperfe 
acrofs the wood ; but foon after one of their chiefs 
advanced towards us alone and unarmed, holding 
in his hand a piece of white fluff, made of the 
bark of a tree, which the Commanding Officer 
received as a token that the good underflanding 
between us and the favages fliould not be inter- 
rupted. Soon after four other natives came and 
fat down in the midfl of us with as much con- 
fidence as their chief, behind whom they placed 
themfelves ; but he feemed much difpleafed with 
feveral others who came to refl themfelves under 
the fhade of the neighbouring trees, .whom he 
feveral times called robbers (kayaj. 

We re-embarked at four o'clock, P. M. and 
were already fleering towards our fhips, when we 
faw a troop of favages running along the flrand 
towards us, loaded with a variety of fruits, which 

they 



April.] of la perouse. 213 

they had brought as a prefent for us. They leaped 
into the water feveral times to bring them to us, 
but we were driven in a wefterly direction by a 
ilirong current, and could not ftop to receive thofe 
marks of reconciliation. 

I went on fliore next day very near the water- 
ing place at the fame time that the General ar^ 
rived there. The guard was ftronger than the 
day before, in order the better to keep the iflanders 
in awe. It was feared after what had pafTed the 
preceding day, they might attempt to poifon the 
water with which we were going to fill our cafks, 
and it was thought necelTary, according to the 
opinion of our Chief Surgeon, to try the experi- 
ment on a goofe ; but it was attended with no 
bad efFeds. Indeed, feveral of our, failors would 
not wait for the refult of that proof, but, being 
very thirfty, had already drank of the water even 
before the commencement of the experiment. 

The inhabitants having approached our place 
of landing, lines were drawn on the fand, the 
limits of which they were forbidden to pafs, and 
we had the fatisfa<5lion to obferve that they fub- 
mitted peaceably to thofe orders. We gave to 
moil of them pieces of bifcuit, which they begged 
by extending one hand, v/hilfl v/ith the other they 
pointed to their bellies, which were naturally 
Very flat, but the mufcles of which they contract- 
ed 



214 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l703 

ed as mucli as pofflble,- to make them look ftill 
more empty. I faw, neverthelefs, one man whofe 
llomacli was already well lined, but who, in our 
prefence, eat a piece of ileatite, which was very 
foft, of a greenifh colour, and twice as large as a 
man's £ft. We afterwards faw a number of 
others eat of the fame earth, which ferves to allay 
the fenfation of hunger by filling the {lomach> 
and thereby fupporting the vifcera of the dia- 
phragm ; although that fubftance affords no nu- 
tritive aliment, it is neverthelefs very ufeful to 
thefe people, who are often expofed to long pri- 
vations from food, becaufe they negled: the cul- 
tivation of the foil, which is of itfelf very barren. 
It is probable that the natives of New Cale- 
donia have made choice of this earth on account 
of its being very liable to crum.ble ; it is extremely 
eafy of digeftion, and one would never have fuf- 
peifled that cannibals would have recourfe to 
liich an expedient when preffed by hunger. 
• ,•> Three women having joined the other favages 
who furrounded Us, gave us no very favourable 
idea of their mufic. They fung a trio, keeping 
time very exacftly, but the roughnefs and dif- 

' Gordant tones ot their voices excited in us very 
difagreeable fenfations, which the favages, how- 

..ever, feemed to liften to with much pleafure. 
Lahaie, the gardener, and myfelf, ventured into 

the ■ 



April.] of la perouse. 2ijJ 

the middle -of tlic wood, followed by only two of 
the flilp's company ; we went from choice into 
thofe places where we thought we had leaft 
chance of meeting with the natives, who took 
care to conceal thcrafelves behind bullies when, 
they perceived us : at other times they hid them- 
felves behind large trees, changing their poiition 
as we moved ; but one old man, finding us ap- 
proaching on both fides of the tree, behind which 
he was, fo that he could not conceal himfelf, 
came up to us as if abandoning himfelf to our 
dlfcretion, but he foon appeared fatisfied he was 
fafe when we gave him a few pieces of.bifcuit. 

The gardener had already fcattered in the wood 
different forts of feeds which he had brought 
from Europe ; but as fome flill remained, he 
gave them to the favage, requefling him to fow 
them. 

We foon difcovercd a number of huts (landing 
at fome diitancc from each other, and were fur- 
prifed at not finding any inhabitants in them. 
They were conftruclcd in the fame manner as 
that defcribcd in the beginning of this chapter : 
further on we perceived a heap of aflies ; pro- 
bably one of the habitations liad been recently 
confumed by the fire which the favages kindle 
to drive away the mufquitoes. 

Two tombs which were not far diilant had 

not 



iZl6 ' VOVAGE IN SEARCH [l793. 

not fuftained any damage. I faw two human 
bones, each fiifpended by a cord to a long pole 
{fcick in the ground ; the one was a tibia, the 
-other a thigh bone. 

I obferved, on the hills which I croffed to re- 
turn to our landing Dlace, the tree called commer- 
Jania echinata, which is very common in the Mo- 
luccas. , Amon&;fl the different f^jrts' of fhrubs 
which I gathered was a jeffamine remarkable for 
the plainnefs of its leaves and its flowers, which 
have no*fmell, andare of the colour of marigolds. 

Several fires lighted near the ilimmit of the 
neighbouring mountain convinced us that it 
ferved as a retreat for the natives. 

On arriving at Our landing place we found a 
great number of favages who had affembled there 
fince our departure. They informed us that feve- 
ral of the inhabitants had been wounded in the 
affair of the preceding evening, and that one had 
already expired of his wounds. They did not 
manifefl any hoflile difpofitions towards us; but 
a boat belonging to the Efperance being at a con- 
fiderable diilance from thence towards the eaft, 
had. been attacked by another party of favages, 
who thought they were in force fufHcient to 
make themfeives mailers of it, but fortunately 
they failed in the attempt. 

We were told on arriving on board that not 

a fmgle 



April.] of la perouse. 21 ;> 

a fingle. canoe had approached our veflels, which 
we thought was rather to be attributed to a 
fmart gale which had blown the whole day, than 
to any fear of our refentment for the hoftlle difpo- 
fition manlfefted by them the precedingevening. 
We had formed a defign, together with feveral 
perfons belonging to the two veffels, to go and 
yifit the other fide of the mountains, bearing 
fouth of our moorings ; for this purpofe we af- 
fembled on the ihore to the number of twenty- 
eight, early in the morning of the 20th. We 
had all agreed to come armed, that we might Idc 

^ able to render mutual affiftance, in cafe the ia- 
yages Ihould venture to make an attack upon us. 
We, marched for a long while in paths that 
were well beaten, accompanied by fome of the 
inhabitants, and many of us, in imitation of them, 
chewed the young fprouts of the hiblfcus til'iaceusy 
and threw them away almoffc immediately ; but 
to our great furprife the favages eagerly picked, 
them up, and chewed them over again without 
the leaft hefitatio'n. 

When we had reached the middle of the moun- 
tain we found very large blocks of mica, wherein 
we perceived granites which had loft their tranf- 

V parency, and moft of them larger than a man's 

thumb. We found others farther on in the rocks 

Vol. II. P of 



21^ VOYAGE IN SEAftCH ['793. 

6f frecftonfc, which were very fmall, hlit retained 
their luftre. 

A fmoke which we obferved to iiTue at inter- 
vals from a grove at a fmall dlflance to the S. 
S. W. induced us to dire<fl our courfe that way. 
We there found two men and a child occupied 
in broiling, 6n ^ fire of charcoal, the roots of a 
ibrt "of bean, which is known to botanifts by the 
name of doUchos tziherofiis, and which the iflandcrs 
call yaU. They h^d been but recently dug up, 
for the ftalks were Hill hanging to them, and were 
covered with flowers and fruits. They partook 
of ^ the barrennefs of the foil which produced 
them, the fibres were very ftringy, and they were 
not not more than three-quarters of an inch in 
thicknefs, and about ten or eleven inches in 
length. ' 

We met very near the fame fpot with a fmall 
family, which appeared to be alarmed at our ap- 
proach. We immediately made each of them a 
few prefents, in" hopes of encouraging them, 
which had the dcfired effecl: upon the hufband 
and two children : but one of our people having 
offered a pair of fciffars to the mother ; and w^ilh- 
ing to fhew her the ufe of them, by cutting off 
a few of her hairs, the poor woman began in- 
ftantly tacry ; no doubt giving hcrfclf up for loff; 

but 



April.'] of la perouse. 219 

but her fears fubfided as foon as flie was put in 
pofTeffion of the inftrument. 

The inhabitants of thefe mountains appeared 
to us to live in the greatefl wretchednefs. They 
•Were all extremely meagre. They fleep in the 
open air without being tormented by the muf-^ 
quitoes ; for thefe infed;s are driven from the high 
grounds by the E. S. E. winds, which blow here 
almoft inceflantly. The fame winds are fo pre- 
judicial to vegetation, that trees v^^hich below 
grow to a great height, here wear the appearance 
offnrubs. Melaleuca latifoUa, for example, is 
fcarcely fourteen inches high, whereas on the 
hills it attains the height of twentj-feven or 
thirty feet. But flill there are vegetables pecu- 
liar to the fummits of thofe mountains, which 
appear to agree perfedlly well with the current of 
air to which they are thus expofed. I iliall give a 
defcrlption of one of the moft remarkable. It 
forms a new genus, which I diftinguifh by the 
name of dracophyllmn. 

The calix is compofed of fix fmall oval leaves, 
pointed towards the end. 

The corolla is in one piece, and divided {lightly 
on the border into fix equal parts. It is furround- 
cd with fix fmall fcales at the lower end. 

The ftamina, to the number of fix, are attached 
P2 to 



220 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l793. 

to the corolla by foiall fine threads, nearly of the 
fame length with the antheras. 

The ovarium is at the top, of a roundilh form, 
and furmounted by a ftyle, of which the ftigma 
is of a fmiplc form. 

The capfule is compofed of fix cells, each con- 
taining a number of feeds, moft of which are uh- 
produftive. 

I ought to obfervc, that one of the parts of 
fructification is often wanting. 

I have given this plant the name o( dracopJiylhim 
vertietllatum, its flowers being difpofed in rings. 

Thefe leaves are rough, and Hightly dentated, 
or notched, on the edges. They leave their im- 
prefEon on the flalk as they feparate from it, as Is 
the cafe w4th all forts of dracaena^ with which 
that plant has a great analogy, even in the texture 
of the wood it -produces. It is therefore of the di- 
vifion of mhiocotyledony although it' has a calyxr 
and a corolla, and naturally takes the next place 
to the fpccies of afparagus. 

Explanation of the Figures, Plate XL. 

Fig. 1. The plant. 
Fisc. 2. Bloflom. 

Fig. 3. The corolla magnified and cut ob- 
liquely, to fhcw the flamlna. 
Fig. 4. The capfule. 

In 



April..] of la perouse. 221 

In examining from the fummit of thefe moun- 
tains a great extent of breakers which defend the 
approach to this ifland, we obferved another paf- 
fage, at a fmall diftance to the weft of that by 
which our vefTels had reached their prefent moor- 
ings. Towards the fouth we had a profped: of a 
delightful valle}-, furrounded with large planta- 
tions of cocoa trees, from amongft which we faw 
columns of fmoke arifmg, from the fires made by 
the favages. Vaft fields^ which appeared to us 
to be cultivated, even in the loweft parts, indi- 
cated a great population. The valley was tra- 
verfed by a canal filled with water, which we 
miftook for a river, the different branches of which 
came from the foot of the eaftern mountains ; 
but we afterwards found that this canal was filled 
with ftagnated fea- water. We perceived towards 
the fouth-vvcft the fhoal, along which we had 
failed the year before ; and we dillinp^uifhed the 
fame inlet in it which the violence of the wind 
had prevented us from founding. It appeared to - 
us a place of fafcty for fuch vclTels as wiihed to 
anchor out of the reach of breakers. 

We were only followed by three natives, who 
no doubt had feen us fail along the weftern coafh 
of their ifland laft year ; for before they had 
quitted us, they fpokc of two vciTcIs they had {ten 
in that dir^iflion. 

P3 We 



222 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l7Q3. 

We proceeded for fome time along the tops 
of the mountains towards the fouth-weft, then 
we defcended into a hollow, where \ye found two 
men and a child, who lliow.ed no concern with 
refped: to us, and did not quit the rock upon 
which they were feated. When we were clofe 
by them, they fliewed us a baflvet (fee I'late 
XXXVIll. Fig. 24), filled with roots, refembiing 
thofe of a kind of fan-flower called helianihus 
tuberojus. They called them paoua^ faying that 
they were good to eat, and, they w^anted to fell 
us a fmall quantity. 

Perceiving, at about thirty yards diftance, a 
thick fmoke iffuing from the midfc of ^ large 
broken rocks, which offered a good fhelter from 
the wind, wx directed our courfc towards it, and 
found a young favage bufy roalling fome roots, 
amongft which we diflinguifhed thofe of the 
doUchos tiiherofus. He did not appear furprized 
at our vifit, andfmiled at us from the bottom of 
his cavern, which was filled with a very black 
fmoke, whereby he however did not appear to Le 
at all incommoded. 

Near this place the fide of the mountain, laid 
open by the torrents which defcend in the rainy 
fcafon, difcovered to us cluflers of beautiful 
pieces of green fchorl in a foft fleatite, and below 

that 



April.] of la perousEc 223 

that Tinall fragments of a very tranfparent rock 
chryftal. 

Ill returnlncr to our velFel v/e came through a 
fmali village, the inhabitants of which left their 
huts uniirmcd. Tliey allowed us to examine the 
infide of them, and one of them, without any hc- 
fitatlon, fold us fome humin bones which were 
hanging up over one of their tombs. 

We foon after arrived on the fea coaft, where 
we found a party of the natives who followed us, 
begging fbmething to eat, but as all our provi- 
iions were confumed, I gave them fome green 
ileatite, which I had brought from the fummit 
of one of the mountains ; forne of them eat as 
much as two pounds weight of it. 

Whilll; we wxre embarking in order to return 
<Mi board, one of the crew fired his piece in the 
air to unload it, w^hich ftruck fuch a panic'k in 
moll: of the iiianders who were on the fliore, th^t 
they inftantly ran off to conceal themfelves in th^e 
'Woods ; but fome of them, confident of our good 
intentions towards them, fhewed no Symptoms 
of fear, but called back the fugitives^ who foon 
rejoined them. 

On the 27th I was obliged to remain all day 
on board, in order to arrange and write defcrip- 
tions of various articles which I h^d college d the 
day before. 

P4 We 



224 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l7Q3. 

We received a vifit from feveral of the natives 
who fwam to the veffel. They were at great 
pains to affure us that they were not in the num- 
ber of thofe who had committed ad:s of hoftihty 
againft us, and they told us they had eaten two of 
thofe robbers, or kaja, one of whom had received 
a ball in the thigh and aaother in the belly in the 
engagement with us, but we did not give entire 
credit to this flory, fuppofmg they had fabricated 
it to fcreen themfelves from fufpicion. 

They brought with them an in^rument which 
the)'" called nhouet, a name which they likewife 
gave to their tombs ; it was formed of a fine piece 
of flat Terpentine ftojie, with fliarp edges, and 
nearly of an oval form, perfectly well polifhed, 
and of the length of nearly feven inches. It was 
perforated with two holes, through each of which 
pafled two very flexible rods, w^hereby it was fixed 
to a wooden handle, to which they were faftened 
with bands made of bat's-fkin. This inftrument 
was fupported by a pedeftal made of a cocoa-nut 
fhell, which was likewife tied with firings of the 
fame kind, fome of which were longer (See 
Plate XXXVIII, Fig. ig). AVc could not till 
then dlfcover the ufe of this inftrument ; thefe 
favages told us that it was to cut up the limbs of 
their enemies, which they divided amongft them 
after a battlq. One of th;:m fiiewed us the man- 
ner. 



April.] of la perouse. 225 

ner, by imitating it on one of the fhip's company, 
who, at his defire, lay down on his back. The fa- 
vage firft reprefented a combat, in which he in- 
dicated by figns that the enemy fell under the 
ftrokes of his javelin and club, which he bran- 
difhed with great violence. He then performed 
a fort of warlike dance, holding in his hand the 
inftrument of murder ; he then fhewed us that 
they begin by opening the belly with the 7ihoiiet, 
throwing away the inteftines, after having torn 
them out v/ith an irlftrumcnt (reprefented in 
Plate XXXVIII. Fig, 2o), made of two human 
cubitus, well polifhed, and fixed to a very llrong 
tape. He fhewed us they next cut off the parts 
of generation, which fell to the Ihare of the con- 
queror. The legs and arms are cut off at the 
joints, and difhributed, as well as the other parts, 
amongfl: the combatants to carry home to their 
families. It is difficult to defcribe the ferocious 
avidity with which he reprefented to us the'man- 
ner in which the flefh of the unfortunate vidim 
is devoured by them, after being broiled on a 
fire of charcoal. 

The fame cannibal gave us likewife to under- 
Hand that the flefh of the arms and legs is cut 
into pieces about three inches thick, and that 
the mufcular parts arc reckoned by thcfc people 

a very 



226 VOYAGE IN SEARCH r [1708, 

a very delicious morfcl. It was no longer diffi- 
cult for us to conceive why they felt our legs and 
arms wkh their fingers in a loncring manner, at 
which times they made a flight whiflling nolfe, 
produced by fhutting the teeth, and applying 
the end of the tongue to them, then opening 
their mouths, they gave feveral fmacks with 
their lips.. 

We wxnt on llicre on the 28th, but not being 
in fufHcient numbers, durft not venture to go far 
beyond our watering place. We no longer faw 
in the environs large parties of natives, as on the 
jErfl: days after anchoring here, which made us 
think that they had returned to their habitations, 
probably at a confiderable diftance from this 
place : indeed how could fuch a vaft number of 
men have found the means of fubfiftence on a 
coaft {o extremely barren. 

Next day (the 2Qth), we fet ofF early, to the 
nurnber of eighteen, all well armed, with the in- 
teiition of afcending a very high mountain, fitu- 
ated to the fouth-fouth-eaft, and from thence 
defcendlng, if the weather fhould prove favour- 
able, into a delightful valley, which we had al- 
ready perceived at a great diflancc behind the 
jnountain. 

We marched at firll towards the eaft along the 

Ihore, 



V 




April.] of la perouse. 227 

Hiore, and foon entered an extenfive wood, when, 
amongft other birds which we killed, there was a 
jfpecies of pie, which I named the pie of New Ca- 
Jedonta. It is entirely black except the breafl, 
flioulders and neck, which are white. The bill is 
rather jagged at the extremity of each mandible, 
and is of a light black from the root to within 
one-third of the point, the remainder is yellowilh. 
The feathers of the tail are arranged in rows two 
by two, the upper ones being much longer than 
the others (See Plate XXXIX, in which the bird 
-is reprefented.) 

We had already proceeded above a mile, when 
we arrived at avilhige compofed of a fmali num- 
ber of huts, fufficiently dillant from each other 
to prevent the flames from communicating in 
cafe of any unfortunate conflagration. Two of 
them had been recently confumed. We there 
faw women cooking viftuals, compofed of the 
bark of trees and a variety of roots,. amongfl: which 
I difcerned thofe of the hypoxis, of which 1 have 
already made mention, Thcfe different articles 
were put dry into a large earthen pot, fupported 
over a fire by three large ftones, which fuppiied 
the place of a trcvet. We obferved near the 
entrance to one of thofe huts a large heap of hu- 
man bones, on v.hich the recent effects of fire 
were very evident. 

It 



2^8 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l793. 

It was probably an inhabitant of this village 
who flolc the fabre • of Bonvouloir, as related 
above, for here we found the fheath and belt fuf- 
pended over one of their tombs, as a kind of 
trophy. 

Upon leaving this village, we followed a beaten 
path to the fouth-eafl, where we were not long 
before we faw fome Caribbee cabbages (arum 
efculentumj , planted near a rivulet, the ftream of 
which the inhabitants of the ifland had turned off 
lower down to a plantation of arum macrorrliizon. 
Farther on we remarked fome young banana 
trees planted at five or fix yards diftance from 
each other, as alfo fome fugar canes. 

Soon after this we v/ere furrounded by at leaft 
forty of the natives, who came out from the ad- 
jacent huts, and from fome ftraggling cottages 
fcattered in an extenfive plain covered with plants 
and fhrubs, above which rofe a fmall number of 
eocoa trees ; but we were aftoniflied to fee only 
very few men amongft .thefe favages, all of whom 
were either old or infirm, and 'mod of them 
cripples. The remainder confifted of women 
and children, who tcftificd much joy at receiving 
fome' prcfents of glafs ware which we gaye them. 
We prcfumed that the ftout men were engaged 
at a dillance in fome expedition againft their 



ncidibour^. 



We 



A^RIL.] OF LA PEROUSE. 2^9r 

We Were about one mile diftant from the firft 
village when we difcovercd another twice as large, 
lltuated on the borders of a fmall river, along 
w hich we went upon*a riiing ground in a fouth- 
erly dire^ion. Upwards of thirty natives came 
out to meet us, and followed us for fbme time. 
We foon perceived three others defccnd from the 
mountains, one of whom we *knew, having re- 
ceived feveral vifits from him on boa"rd the Re- 
cherche. Several amongft the natives pointed 
him out to us as a chief of great diflincflion, whom 
they called AUki, 

We fat down on the borders of the fmall 
river to take fome refrcfliment, and to prevent 
the danger of any furprize from the favages, we 
invited them to fit down. AUkt immediately 
complied with our invitation, and his example 
was followed by the others. The water being 
a few paces below us, the favages filled our bottles 
as faft as we emptied them. 

After brcakfaft we afcended towards the fbuth, 
accompanied by AUkt and three other natives, 
w ho tcftified a ftrong defire to follow us. Some 
cocoa and banana trees, planted on the leafV rug- 
ged of the borders of the hollow formed by the 
waters of the fmall river, pointed out to us the 
reiidence of fome of the natives. We found 

there 



230 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l 793. 

there a hut exa(5lly like thofe which we had feen 
before. Aliki iiiid the hut belonged to him. It 
was furrounded with feveral of a new fpecies of 
fig tree, the fruit of Which thofe people eat, after 
having expofed it to the fire for fome time in 
earthen vefl'cls, in order to extra(5l its corrofivr. 
quality. 

Clouds, brought on by a brific gale from the 
fouth-eaft, covered the tops of the mountain.s 
about ten in the morning, and occasioned a heavy 
fhower of rain, of which the favagcs took fcarcely 
any notice. They did not even feek for any 
fhelter, whilil: we retired underneath the thickeft 
trees. As foon as it ceafed we continued our 
route, and they followed us with many marks of 
friendfhip. One of them, wifliing to relieve a 
failor who was loaded -with a large tin-box, filled 
with a variety of objects of natural hiftory, car- 
ried it for above four hours. 

We foon after crolTed over the fmall river, on 
the banks of w^hich 1 obferved the acanthus Hid- 
folins. We then afcended very rugged rocks for 
a confiderable time, and were under great obli- 
gations to the favages, who exerted themfelves in 
fupporting us by the arms, to prevent our failing. 

Each of them carried an axe ^f ferpentine 
ftone ; and one of them wishing to fhow us how 

they 



April.] of la rEiiousE. 231 

they made ufe of them to cut wood, hacked off 
a branch of the melaleuca lalifoUoy about four 
inches thick. 

It was not till a:ftcr a number of ftrokes, that 
he was able to make a Hight notch in it, then he 
broke it by forcibly bending down the end of it ; 
they all (hewed the greateft furprize at feeing us 
cut down in a fliort time, with a military axe, 
fome of the largcft trees in the foreft. 

We had juft reached the, fummit of one of the 
higheft of thofe mountains, when one of our 
people made {igns to the favages that he wifned to 
have fome water to drink. Immediately two of 
them offered to go and fetch iome from a hol- 
low that appeared to be above half a mile dillant. 
They fct off, and \\c foon loft fight of them. As 
they were a long time before they returned, wc 
were afraid they had gone away with the bottles 
we had entrufted them with, but at laft they 
returned,^and appeared pleafed that they had it in 
their power to otter us fome very pure water to 
quench our thirft. 

After this wc dcfccndcd towards the fouth-eaft 
and croiTed a fine valley, where I made a copious 
coUc6tion of plants, among which were the acrcf- 
tichum mtflrale, and fevcral new fpecies of limp- 
donini, 

A very 



232 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l703i 

A very heavy rain obliged us to fcek for fhclter 
in the hollows of the rocks, where we remained 
for fome time. We invited the favages w^ho ac- 
companied us to partake of our repaft, but were 
much furprifed to find thofe cannibals rcjed: with 
difdain the falted pork w'hich was offered them. 

The badnefs of the weather having prevented 
our continuing all night on the mountains, we re- 
turned towards our.veflels, going in a wefterly di ■ 
redion, in order to follow the declivity into a 
large valley, parallel with that w^hich we had juft 
croffed. I there obferved many new fpecies of 
pajjiflora. The ginger, amojmim ztngiher, grew 
there abundantly, but the natives told us they 
made no ufe of it. As fbon as we arrived on the 
Ihore, where we found our boats in waiting, to 
take us on board the fhips, they quitted us, and 
w^ent off to the eaftward. 

I employed the w^hoie of the 30th in defcrib- 
ing and aflbrting the numerous collection of ar- 
ticles of natural hiftory, which I had made the 
day before. 

May ift. This day we went towards the fouth- 
eafb, and after having penetrated a confiderable 
w^ay into the woods, we arrived at a hut iur- 
rounded with palifades, behind which wxre a w^o- 
man and two children, who appeared frightened 

on 



May*] of la perouse. 233 

on our approach, but they refumed their courag# 
upon our prefentlng them with fome pieces of 
cloth, and a few glafs beads. 

We next went towards two sfreat fires that 

o 

were kindled bv the favap;es in one of the moft 
gloomy parts of the forcft. They difperfed as 
foou as they perceived us, leaving two bafkets 
filled with the bark of trees. 

Soon after we arrived on the borders of fome 
marlhes, where we killed feveral beautiful birds of 
the genus mufcicnpa : they had been attracted 
thither by the fwarms of mufquitoes, which ferved 
them for food. Further on Vv e found two young 
girls who had juft lighted a fire : they were dref- 
fing for their repall different forts of roots, 
amongfl whigh I recognized feveral belonging to 
plants which I had met with under the fhade of 
the large trees in the foreft. The girls left their 
provifions for fome time, retiring as we ap- 
proached them. 

On our quitting the wood, we met with feveral 
favages who accompanied us to our landing place. 
'They were much amufed with feeing Citizen 
Riche's dog purfue fome of the natives who were 
at a confiderable diftance, and whom he foon 
overtook, though they ran as faft as they could. 
As he did them no injury, thofe who were with 
us begged us to fet him at fome women who 

Vol. IL Q were 



234 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l 793. 

^ere then coming out of the wood, and were 
anticipating their fright, but we would not be 
pcrfuaded to comply with their requeft. 

We were witnefs, on arriving at the fhorc, to a 
faA which proves the great corruption of man- 
ners amongfl thefe cannibals. There were two 
girls, the oldeft of whom was not more than 
eighteen,- who were fhewing to our failors that 
part which they are accuflomed to conceal w^ith 
the fringed girdle mentioned above, and which 
forms the whole of their clothing. A nail, . or 
fomething of equal value, was fixed upon as the 
price of this favour ; but they took care to make 
their curious cuftomers pay beforehand. 

Upon returning to the fhip, I found a chief who 
had dined at the tabic w^ith the officers. He had 
come in his canoe, accompanied by his Wife, 
whom he' would never allow to come on board, 
notwithftanding our repeated requefts to that 
purpofe. 

On the 2d we went a fliooting in the great 
woods, which we had not explored, to the fouth- 
eaft, where we killed a prodigious quantity ot^ 
birds. We flopped in a fmall village, where 
we faw over two tombs pieces of wood rudely 
carved: the inhabitants told us that it was forbid- 
den to approach them ; but they confented very 
readily to fell us in exx:hange for fome pieces of 

cloth 



May.] Of la PEROtrsfii 235 

cloth a human fcuU that was fufpended over 
another tomb, th-e coronal bone of which was 
fractured on the left fide. They informed us, 
that the warrior it belonged to had been killed in 
battle by a club. 

Next mornlhg early, twenty of us fet off with 
an intention to crofs the mountains, and frorii' 
thence to defcend into the exteniive valley, where, 
in one of our excurfions, we had defcried at a great 
diftance a considerable number of cultivated fields. 
It was probable that we fhould there meet with 
a great number of inhabitants, but we were fuf- 
ficiently well armed to be able to repel any attack 
which they might venture to make 

At firft we followed the coaft, advancing to- 
wards the vv^eft, and penetrating from time to 
time into the woods, W6 faw a number of inha- 
bitants quit their huts, and leave behind them a 
fiet which they had fpread oiit to dry. It ap- 
peared that that implement of fiiliing is very 
tart amongfl thefe favages: its common fize is 
about eight yards in length, and eighteen inches 
'in breadth. They fliewed us but very few of 
them during our whole ll:ay in the Ifland, and 
' no price could tempt any of them to part with 
one. . 

We perceived near this place a great quantity 
©f broken fhells of fifh, , which had ferved the 

Q 2 Illanders 



236 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l793. 

Wanders for food. We found feveral of the fpe- 
cles known by the name of hemtier, of the length 
of twelve or thirteen inches. They ftill bore the 
marks of the fire which had ferved to drefs the 
animal contained in them. 

The women principally are employed in fifhing 
for fhell-fifli. We faw fome of them from time 
to time, oppofite to where we lay at anchor, w^ho 
advanced into the water up to their waifls and 
gathered great quantities, which they difcovered. 
in the fand, by means of pointed fticks with 
which they groped for them. 

We had already gone about three miles along 
the coall without finding any ftream of water, 
when three young favages came to meet us, and 
perfuaded us to follow them to their cottage, 
not far out of our road. We then found a fpring, 
below which they had dug fome trenches to con- 
dud: the water to fome plants of the arum tna- 
, crorrhhzon, the roots of which they eat. 

We were on the flope of a fmall hill, under 
the fliade of fome cocoa trees. One of the fa- 
vages, w^hom I requefled to . procure us fome of 
their fruit, climbed to the top of the tree wuth an 
extraordinary degree of agility. 

We foon after continued our courfe to the 
weft ward. The air was ferene, and the heat 

excefHve, 



May.] of la perouse. 237 

exceffive, and we were attacked by a cloud of 
mufquitoes, which tormented us very much, by 
flinging every part of the body, not even fparing 
our eyes and ears. Fortunately a breeze of wind 
Springing up foon after, reheved us from their 
perfecutions, by dlfperfmg them. 

Soon after this we arrived on the borders of a 
deep canal, which went in an inland diredlion 
to the foot of a very craggy mountain. This 
canal ferved as a harbour for the iflanders, three 
of whom we faw enter it in a double canoe, 
which they immediately faftened with a rope 
tied to the foot of a tree on the fame fide we 
were. They then went at a flow pace towards 
the fmall hills on the fouth-eaft, pretending not 
to have perceived us. Their canoe was the only 
one in the harbour. We made ufe of it to crofs 
to the other fide, where we found a fmall cottage, 
the plantations contiguous to which had been re- 
cently laid wafte. We ftill perceived fome re- 
mains of Caribee cabbages, and of fiigar canes. 
. The tops of all the cocoa trees had been cut off, 
and perhaps inhabitants had fallen Ti<5lims to the 
voracity of the barbarians who had thus deftroyed 
them. 

Till then we had never met with any of the 
tombs of the favages, except clofe by their huts, 
but we now found one at a great dillance from 

Q 3 any 



238 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l793. 

any habitation whatever, on the fide of the road 
which we purfued. It differed from the others, 
being built of ftone from the bafe till about, half 
way up. 

We halted about noon, under the fhade of fe^ 
veral cafuarlna equefeUfoUa, and of feveral new 
ipecies of cerhera^ which grew on the banks of 
a rivulet, where we quenched our thirft, and in 
which we found fome fragments of roche dc come, 
brought down by the water. We caught two 
fea-fnakes fco.liiher laticandotusj, which we broiled 
and eat, but found very tough and ill tafted. 

We w^ere about eleven miles diftant from our 
veffels when frefh marks of devaftation made us 
lament the lot of the wretched inhabitants, whom 
revenge often prompts to the commiffion of tlie 
moft horrible exceffes. They had deftroyed the 
principal habitations, and cut off the tops of all 
the cocoa-trees about them, having only fpared 
two fmall flieds which were covered with fpongy 
bark of the melahuca laitfolia, 

Prefently after a foreil of cocoa trees, whofe 
tops we perceived at the diftance of a mile and a 
half to the w^eft, together with feveral columns 
of fmoke which rofe in different direclions, were 
indications of a great population. We directed 
our courfe toward this place for fome time, but 
0ie marfhy ground which we rpuft h^vc crolfed 

to 



May.] of la perouse. 239 

to reach it, caufed us to abandon our dcfign ; be- . 
iides, the day drew towards a clofe. We then 
went fouthward in fearch of a commodious fitua- 
tion to pafs the night in, when we foon pitched 
on an eminence, the difficult accefs to which fe- 
cured us from being furprifed by the favages. We 
hghted a fire, for the cold was fharp and piercing 
on thefe high grour^s, and we felt it the more 
fenfibly, as during the day we had experienced 
in the plain a very great degree of heat. 

I gave all the birds which 1 did not mean to 
preferve to thofe of the fhip's crew who accom- 
panied us, and amongft thofe which they broiled 
immediately for our fupper were feveral of the 
corvus caledonkuSy and fome very large pigeons of 
a new fpecies, which I had before met with on 
the firft days after our arrival. 

We all fupped and then went to fleep, leaving 
two of our number to watch by turn, for it was 
to be feared that the light of our fire would bring 
fome of the iflanders to us. In a very fhort time 
we were apprifed that the light of feveral torches, 
with v/hich the favages were approaching our re- 
treat in an eafterly diredion, was perceived to- 
wards the foot of the mountains. In an inftant 
we were all on our legs to obferve their motions, 
and prepared to give them luch a reception as 
circumftai^ces might render neceffary in cafe of 
/) Q 4 attack ; ' 



240 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l 793. 

attack ; but after traverfmg feveral fmall hills, 
they defcended towards the coaft, getting farther 
from us to the .eaftward. Perhaps thefe canni- 
bals were upon forne expedition againfl their ene- 
mies. As we did not appear to be the objed: they 
were in queft of, we immediately lay down again 
to lleep, trufting to the vigilance of our centinels. 

4th. At day-break we afcended towards the 
fouth-eaft, and were not long before we reached 
the fummit of the mountain, from whence we 
perceived, toward the wefl-fouth-weft, on the 
fea coaft, the great opening of the canal which 
traverfes the plain we propofed to viiit. 

We foon defcended into a valley, nearly about 
the middle of which flood a delightful grove, to 
appearance planted by the hand of man, but it 
was only the goodnefs of the foil, moiftened by 
the water from the neighbouring mountains, that 
rendered the bufhes fo ftrong and luxuriant. I 
then collected a great number of plants, amongft 
which I found a new kind of fern of the myrio' 
theca fpecies, the tallefh of which rofe to the 
height of twelve feet, although the ftem was not 
more than three inches and three quarters in cir- 
cumference. 

On leaving the grove we perceived two natives 
about three hundred yards below us, going towards 
the plain, of which we now difcovered the full 

extent. 



May.} of la pehouse. 241 

extent. They looked at us -without iliopping, not- 
withftanding the figns of invitation we made 
them to come to us. One of them carried on his 
Ihoulder, at the end of a^llick, a bafket;, in all pro- 
bability filled with roots. 

We had only a few more fmall hills to crofs 
before we reached the plain, when feveral of our 
companions, apprehenfive that we iliould be in 
want of victuals if we went much farther, or 
perhaps that we fhould meet with numerous 
parties of favages, left us and returned to the Ihips 
early in the day. Our number was now reduced 
to fifteen, upon their departure ; neverthelefs we 
continued our journey. We foon found by the 
fide of a path w hich feemed much frequented by 
the favages, feveral cabbage-palms, and having 
refrefhed ourfelves with the tender leaves from 
the tops of thofe trees, we defcended into a hol- 
low, where feveral fine aleurites added to our rc- 
pafl a plentiful deffert of fruit, the kernels of 
which w^e found of a very agreeable flavour. 

The quartz and mica which were fpread over 
a large fpace, formed in that place a foliated rock 
of a very brilliant appearance, compofed of a thin 
ftrata. 

We at length gained the plain, where the me- 
lancholy fight of a habitation entirely deflroyed, 
and cocoa trees cut up by the roots, furniihed 

us. 



242 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l793. 

US with frelli proofs of the barbarity of the na- 
tives. 

Farther on we faw plantations of yams, pota- 
toes, &c. We proceeded for fome time towards 
the fouth, and were furprifed at not feeing any 
©f the favages, when I perceived an old man em- 
ployed in pulling up the roots of the dolichos tu- 
ber ofus, which he gave to a child to clean. He 
did not feem in the leaft intimidated on obferving 
us approach him, but every feature of the child 
v/as exprefiive of the moft violent apprehenfion. 
The old man had loft one eye, which he told us 
had been knocked out by a ftone, and we thought 
we recognifed him to be one of thofe inhabitants 
who had come feveral times to vifit us on board 
of our veiTels. 

This man accompanied us along the path in a 
ibuth-eafterly diredion acrofs the plain, but had 
much difficulty in keeping up with us, for he 
had been wounded in one leg, where we perceived 
two great fears oppofite to each other, as if it had 
httn pierced through and through with a dart 

On both fides of the road we faw ftraggling 
huts at great diftances from each other, fur- 
rounded with cocoa trees. Only a few favages 
appeared at a diftancc in the middle of the vaft 
plain. On our right lay a thick foreft of cocoa 
trees extending to the fooc of the mountains, on 
c V the 



May.] of la perouse. 243 

the edge of which we perceived a great number 
of huts. 

We had gone a little more than a mile with 
the favage, when he perfuaded us to ftop Tn the 
neighbourhood of a habitation, probably his own, 
for he invited us to gather the fruit of the cocoa 
trees which furrounded it ourfelves, excuflng 
himfelf from climbing the trees on account of his 
wounds. I gave him fome pieces of cloth of 
different colours, and fome nails, which he fcem- 
ed to value highly. 

Soon after ' another favage came to us, and 
both followed us till we came to the banks of a 
branch of the great canal which crolTed the plain ; 
it was filled with ftagnant water, equally fait 
with that of the fea. 

We perceived at a diftance fome women and 
children, when our two favages left us, after 
' having pointed out the path v/hich conducted us 
to the mountains. 

At the fame inflant fome other natives fet fire 
to the dry grafs at a great diftancc before us on 
the fide of the path which we were following, 
and immediately difappeared in the woods. 

After proceeding about half an h'our, I arrived 
on a very agreeable eminence, where the natives 
had built themfelves flieds about fix feet in height, 
in order to enjoy the frcfli air. They were of a 

femi- 



244 VOYAGE XJf SEARCH [l793. 

femicircular form, and open at bottom all round 
to the height of about one foot, to admit a free 
circulation of air. We found no favages in either 
of two neighbouring huts, which were built near 
9. bog, furrounded with the hiblfcus tiliaceus ; but 
contiguous to them we faw a large cultivated field, 
covered with yams, potatoes, and a fort of hypoxh, 
the roots of which thofe people eat, and which 
grows fpontaneoully in their forefts. 

It was already one hour after dark, when w^e at 
laft arrived at the fummit of the mountains ; 
from whence, looking in a north-wxfl dirediion, 
Twe perceived the lights of our velfels. At fix 
or eight hundred paces below were feveral fires, 
lighted by the natives. The cold compelled us 
likewife to kindle a \&rj large one^ round w^hich 
we fat down to refreih ourfelves, after which we 
wxnt to ileep, leaving two fentinels to guard two 
pafiages by which the iflanders might come to 
furprize us, but none of them attempted to dif- 
turb our repofe. Only at day-break the fentinel 
who w^as to the north-eaft efpied three of them 
approaching very flowly, but they returned back 
on hearing him cry out to warn us of their 
coming. 

5th. All our provifions being confumed, we felt 
fenfibly the neceffity of returning on board. I 
cpuld not, however, refill the defire I had to fpend 

a few 



May.] of la perouse. 245 

a few hours in vifitlng a charming grove of trees, 
fituated on the other fide of the mountain, at a 
fmall diftance from the place where we had pafTed 
the night. I there obferved a great quantity of 
plants, which I had not yet found in any of the 
excurfions I had made in this ifland. . They be- 
longed chiejfly to the clafs of the filver tree and 
the trumpet flower. 

I will here give a defcription of one of the 
finefl flirubs which grows on thefe heights. It 
forms a genus which I call antholoma, and which 
ought to be placed amongft the fpecies of the 
plaqueminiers. 

The calyx, compofed of from two to four leaves 
of an oval form, often falls ofF w^hen the flower 
blows. 

The corolla is of one piece in the form of a eup, 
and irregularly indented on the edges. 

The fl:amina are numerous (about an hundred), 
and attached to a flelhy receptacle. 

The ovarium is of a pyramidal form, quadran- 
gular, flightly funk into the receptacle, and fur- 
mounted by a ilyle terminated by a pointed 
ftigma. 

The fruit has four cells filled with a great num- 
ber of feeds ; it was not yet ripe, but I think it 
becomes a capfule. 

I have diftinguilhed a flirub by the name of 

ajithohma 



246 VOYAGE IN SEARCIt [l793. 

antholotna mo7itana, many plants of which I ob- 
ferved fifteen feet in height. Its leaves are alter- 
nate, very ftrong, and, as well as the flowers, are 
only to be found at the extremity of the branches* 

Explanation of the Figures in Plate XLL 

Fig. 1 . Branch of the anthohma montana. 

Fig. 2. Flower. 

Fig. 3. Receptacle, flamina, and ovarium. 

Fig. 4. Corolla. 

Fig. (5. Stamina magniiied. 
; One of the geographers of our company having 
left us about this time for the diftance of rather 
more than half a mile, in order to afcertain the 
pofition of the fhoals which he difcovered from 
a high peak, received a vifit from a favage, who 
approached him in a threatening manner ; he was 
armed v/ith a dart and a club, and we wxre afraid 
he intended to attack him, but he contented 
himfelf with examining the inilruments which 
he w^as ufmg, without giving him the fmallefl 
caufe of complaints 

We arrived at our vefTels about noon. I obferved 
along the coafl a double canoe with two fails. It 
was conftru(fledlike thofe of tlie ifianders of New 
Caledonia, but the men who wxre in it fpokelhe 
language of the natives of the Friendly Iflands. 
They were eight in numbef, being feven men and 

one 




J^l4 tyJ.StrckilaU.J'leeatfiUj, /jA^rfV. ISOO . 



May.] of la PEROtrsE. 247 

one woman, all very mufciikrly built (See Plate 
XXXIV.) They told us that the iiland from 
whence they came was a day's fail to the eaft cf 
our moorings, and that the name of it was Aou- 
vea ; it was doubtlefs the iiland of Beaupre w^hich 
they meant. 

Thefe inlanders, who were quite naked, had the 
end of the prepuce tied to the lower part of the 
belly by a cord of the outer covering of the cr'ocoa 
nut, which went twice round them. They know 
the ufe of iron, and appeared much more intelli- 
gent than the natives of New Caledonia. 

I was much furprized to lee one of the planks 
of their canoes covered with a coat of varniili ; 
and it appeared to have belonged to feme Euro- 
pean veiTel, which I Vv'as convinced of when I 
found that the pov/der of lead formed a great part 
in the compofition of the varnifh. Without doubt 
the plank had belonged to a veffel of fome civi- 
lized nation VvTecked on this coaft. I requeued 
the favages to inform us of what they knew con- 
cerning the plank ; they fet fail foon after to the 
weft, promifmg to return next day to bring us 
information ; but they did not keep their word,- 
and we never had an opportunity of feeing them 
again. 

When we returned, wx v/ere informed that the 
fame day that we had left the ihip on our excur- 
sion. 



248 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l7Q3. 

-fion, the lavages had attempted to feize the 
hatchets of our wood- cutters, whom they had 
attacked with ftones, but two mufkct jQiots had 
been fufficient to difperle them. 

I employed the whole of the 6th to defcribe 
and arrange the numerous colIe6lion of articles of 
natural hiflory which I had brought with me 
from the mountains. 

Next day the intelligence of the death of Cap- 
tain Huon, which we learnt at day-break, fpread 
a general forrow amongft all thofe concerned in 
the expedition. This ikilful naval officer had 
fallen a facrifice to a hectic fever about one o'clock 
in the morning, after an illnefs of feveral months. 
He met death with the greatefl coolnefs, and was 
interred, according to his particular defire, near 
the centre of the ifland of Pudyona, favoured by 
the veil of night. He had rcquefted that no kind 
of monument might be ere6led for him, appre- 
henfive that it n:iight lead to a difcovery of his 
burial place by the inhabitants of New Caledonia. 

Soon after fun-rife eight of us went afhorc, 
and penetrated into the woods in a wefl-fouth- 
weft dire^lion. We foon arrived at a cottage, 
firoiii whence came a native carrying in his hand 
a mafk, which he agreed to fell to me for two 
joiner's chilTcls. This malk was cut out of a piece 
of the wood of the cocoa tree (See Plate XXXVII. 

Fig. 



May.] t OF LA PEROUSE. 249 

Fig. 10.), but much better carved than the figures 
we had feen in other places at the entrance into 
their houfes. He covered his face with it feveral 
times, peeping through the holes made in the 
upper part of it. There was an opening for the 
mouth, but there were none for the eyes. They 
probably make ufe of thofe mafias to prevent be- 
ing known by their enemies when they under- 
take any hoftile enterprize* 

We then advanced towards two fires lighted 
clofe by the huts, wher« we found a man and 
woman dreffing figs of a new fpecies, which they 
had placed upon the fire in a great earthen pot, 
without water, to take away the corrofive qua- 
lity. They called thofe figs ouyou. 

I remarked two children at the fire, regaling 
themfelves with fpiders of a new fpecies, which 
I had obferved frequently in the woods, where 
they fpread their webs of fuch ftrength, as fre- 
quently to incommode us very much in our pro- 
grefs. They firft killed them, covering them up 
in a great earthen velTel, which they heated on a 
brifk fire. They then broiled and eat them. They 
fwallowed at leafl one hundred of them in our 
prefence. We faw afterwards in the fame illand 
feveral other inhabitants eagerly feeking the fame 
kind of food. 

Such an extravagant and yet fb general a tafle 
Vol. JI. . R amongfl 



25C> VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l793. 

amongO: fo many numerous tribes caufed us great 
furprize, although we knew that fomc Europeans 
eat fpiders, and in preference fuch as are found 
in cellars, which they affirm tafte like nuts. 

The inhabitants of New Caledonia call this a 
fpecies of nougui, which I diflinguiili by the name 
of aranea edulis (fpider which the Caledonians 
eat.). This fpider is reprefented in Plate XII. 
Fi^. A. The fituation of its eyes (See Fig. 5 
• and 6.) which are eight in number, tw^o being 
near the middle of its back, at a great dlftancc 
from the others, make me give it a place in a 
new feAion of a black colour. Its back is grey, 
and above is covered with filver down ; between 
the eyes are four fpots of a brown colour ; below 
it is black. The lower part of the belly is of the 
fame colour as the upper part of the back, and is 
marked with from eight to ten fpots of a brown 
colour. On the {ides arc fix greyiili lines in an 
oblique direction, and below feveral faun-coloured 
fpots. The legs, which are alfo of a faun- colour 
.and covered wnth claws ot a fdver grey, are 
blackiih towards their extremity. 

One of the fuiilecrs who accompanied us had 
loft one of his piftols ; wx informed the inha- 
bitants of this circumftance, and promifed them 
a reward if they would bring it to us. It was 
w^ith eonfidcrablc plcafure that wc faw, an hour 

after 



May.] of la perouse. 251 

after we had quitted them, a favage corrle run- 
ning towards us with the piftol, which he faid 
he had found on the fands. In fad:, the foldier 
remembers having left it in the place where we 
had dined. A piece of cloth and a waiftcoat 
proved a very agreeable recompenfe to the iflander. 
He followed us for fome time accompanied by an- 
other Caledonian; then bid us adieu, pronouncing 
the word alaotie, bowing flightly with his head, 
retiring with an appearance of great fatisfadlion. 

When we had reached the fliore, one of us fired 
his piece as a fignal to the fliip's company, that 
a boat might be fent off for us ; the noife of the 
explofion colled:cd above eighty of the natives 
around us. We invited them to fit down as faft 
as they arrived, in order to prevent them from 
coming too clofe, and notwithilanding the dif^ 
proportion of our number, (for we were only 
eight,) they all agreed to our requeft. One of 
thefe favages had a few tolerably fweet oranges, 
which he confented to fell to me for a pair of 
fciffars. 

We learned, on arriving on board, that feveral 
perfons belonging to the Efperance, being in a 
canoe, had been affailed this morning with a 
ihower of ftoncs by the natives, on which it was 
found neccilary to fire feveral rnufket fhot to 
make them retire into iho, wood. It muft, how- 

R 2 ever. 



252 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l 7'93. 

ever, be allowed, that this conteft was owing to 
the imprudence of one of our men, who, wafh- 
ing to keep the Caledonians at a diftance, had 
pointed his piece at them, which went ofF, 
through his aukwardnefs. 

8th. General Dentrecafteaux gave the com- 
mand of the Efperance to Dauribeau. 

I was very bufy during the greater part of the 
day, at a work which w^as indifpenfably neceffary 
for the prefervation of my colledlions. -In the 
afternoon I went on fhore, and foon after I per- 
ceived a number of the iflanders who had attacked 
bur fifhermen, in order to carry ofF both the not 
and the fifh that were caught. We were obliged 
to fire at leaft twenty mufket Ihot before they, 
could be entirely difperfed. They ilood firm on 
the fhore the whole time, returning our muf- 
ketry with their flings, a flone from one of which 
wounded the mailer-gunner of the Efperance 
ferioufly in the arm ; they then gave way, but in 
a few feconds returned anew to the attack ; how- 
ever, when they perceived two of their number 
fall, in confequence of our fire, and wounded fo 
as to be fcarcely able to crawl to the neighbour- 
ing wood, they were feized witb a general panic, 
and fled, nor did any others venture to renew the 
attack. 

■ At the fame time that this encounter began, 

the 



May.] of la perouse. 253 

the Commander in Chief of the expedition left 
his vefTel to go on board the Efpcrance ; he im- 
mediately directed his boat toward the Ihore, but 
the favagcs were entirely difperfed before he ar- 
rived there. 

Before our fifliermen had been interrupted by 
the iflanders, they had caught feveral fpecies of 
the fcorpaena, amongft which was that known 
by the name oi fcorpaena digit at a pricked one of 
our feamen fo acutely in the hand, that for fe- 
veral hours he felt a very violent pain through 
his whole arm. 

Qth. This morning at day break we went afhorc 
at the neareft landing place to our fhip, and fix 
of us, well armed, penetrated into the woods, 
advancing for a long time to the fouth-fouth-weft. 
I found on that excurfion many plants which I 
had not before met with. 

I foon obfcrved a large bread-fruit tree, which 
grew^ near the middle of the mountain, being 
the fecond I had met with in the ifland. I ' 
took from it three fuckers, which I planted in 
a box in w^hich I had put thofe I had taken in 
the Friendly Iflands. Their leaves were not fo 
wide apart as thofe of the latter, perhaps they 
might not produce fuch excellent fruit. But 
after the care which I obferved the natives take 
of that which I had feen in a \411age to the 

K 3 fouth- 



254 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l/QS. 

ibuth-caft of our lliip, I could not doubt but that 
they fet a great value on this tree ; it was planted 
in a very good foil, and furrounded with ftrong 
palifades. Neither of thofe trees yielded fruit at 
that time, but had a great number of male 
flowers. 

We had already advanced a great way up the 
mountain, when fome of the people belonging 
to our veiTel, who went on fhore, difcharged 
their pieces before they returned on board. The 
report of the mufketry made us refolve to direft 
our courfe toward them immediately, appre- 
henfive of their being engaged with the favages. 
Night approached, and we went off to go on 
board our veffel, but the wind blew from eaft- 
fouth-eaft with fuch violence, and the current 
was fo ftrong, that they were driven rapidly to 
wxftward ; we had even great difficulty in mak- 
ing the Efperance, which we left half an hour 
fifterwards to go on board the Kecherche, as the 
weather had become more favourable. 

The natives of New Caledonia are in general 
of the middle fize, we however, faw one who 
was more than fix feet in height, but very ill 
built. Their hair is woolly ; their cuftom of 
pulling it up by the roots is very general ; but we 
faw fome of them who let their beards grow. 
TThe colour of their fkin is as dark as that of thg 

inhabitants 



Ma^y.] of la. PEROUSE. 255 

inhabitants of Dicmcn's land. They do not cover 
themfeves Uke the former with charcoal duft, 
though we remarked a few amongft them who 
had blackened a part of their breails with it, 
tracing thereon broad flrokes in an oblique di- 
rediion which they call poun, in their language ; 
many of them were adorned with necklaces, 
like that reprefented in Plate XXXVII, Fig. 4 ; 
thefe necklaces w^erc made of twifled threads, 
fufpended from which they ufually carried at the 
end of a bit of firing, a fmall piece of bone very 
indifferently carved, which appeared to be a hu- 
man bone. Their arms were fometimes orna- 
mented with bracelets cut, fome from fhells, 
others of quartz, or very hard flones. (See Plate 
XXXVII. Fig. 5 and 6.) 

Thefe warlike people devote the greatefl atten- 
tion to the manufadiure of their arms, which 
they polifh perfectly well. Their clubs are of ,a 
great variety of forms, fome of which are to be 
feen in Plate XXXVII. 

I was much furprifed to find that they were 
unacquainted with the ufe of bows. 

Their javelins, which are commonly fifteen 
feet in length, are not more than two and a half 
inches in circumference in the middle. I ad-- 
mired the ingenious method they had invented 
to accelerate th' "notion of thofe javelins when 

R 4 they 



256 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l793. 

they throw them : For that purpofe they em- 
ploy a piece of very elaflic cord, made of the co^ 
vering of the cocoa nut and fifh fkin, one ex^ 
tremity of which they fix to the end of the fore- 
finger, and the .other which ends in a fort of 
round button, is twifted round the end of the 
dart, but in fuch a manner as to quit its hold as 
foofi as that weapon is thrown into the air. (See 
Plate XXXV.) 

1 did^ not perceive amongfi: thefe iflanders any 
confirmed fymptom of the venereal difeafe, al- 
though many of them had a fwelling of con- 
fiderable fize on the organs of generation, and 
others had obfi:ru(ftions of the feminal glands. 

The voracity of which the Caledonians had 
given us evident proofs, prevented the General 
from giving them the he and ihe goats as he 
had intended : they had, doubtlefs, devoured the 
hogs and the two dogs, of which Captain Cook 
had made a prefent to one of their chiefs. They 
fcarcely took any care of their fowls ; I only faw 
three hens and one cock during our flay in the 
ifland. 

We did not perceive amongft them any of the 
articles given them by Captain Cook. Perhaps 
thefe riches had been the caufe of the misfor- 
tunes of the inhabitants of this coaffc, .y exciting 
their neighbours to come and plunder them. 

Ire- 



May.] of la perouse* 2^7 

I remarked with aftonifhment that the autho- 
rity of their chiefs had always appeared very in- 
confiderable in our various dealings vs^ith the fa- 
vages ; but I was not lefs furprifed to find that 
they exercifcd great power when their own pri- 
vate interefl was at flake, for they generally feizcd 
upon fuch articles as their fubjed:s had received 
from us. 

While we were in New Caledonia we enjoyed 
a pretty fcrene fky. 

The winds varied from the north-eafl to the 
fouth, and the ftrongefl were the eafl and the 
fouth-cafl. 

Our moorings were in lat. 20° 1 /' 29" fouth, 
and l02° 16'' 28'' eaft longitude. 
' 5^he variation of the needle was 9° 30'' towards 
the eafl. 

The mercury in the barometer never rofe above 
28 inches 2 lines jnd 2-lOths, and never fell be- 
low 28 inches 1 line and 4-lOths. 

Notwithflanding the exceflive heat which we 
felt on the coafl, the thermometer never ex- 
ceeded 25°, and on board never rofe above 21°. 

The tides were not obfervable above once a 
day, when we lay at anchor. The flood took 
place at half paft fix, and the waters rofe in per- 
pendicuvaiijiicight four fc : feven inches. 

We could not gather the leafl intelligence 
. ^ during 



258 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l /O^. 

during our flay at New Caledonia, concerning 
the fate of thofe unfortunate navigators who wxre 
the obje(5l of our refearches. It is not, however, 
improbable, that this dangerous and almoft inac- 
ccffible coaft proved fatal to them. We know 
that La Peroufe was to have explored the weftern 
coaft of it, and one is chilled with horror in re- 
flecting on the fate that would await thofe unfor- 
tunate feamen, Ihould a fhipwreck have obliged 
them to feek for refuge amongft the cannibals that 
inhabit it. 

CHAP. XIV. 

Departure from New CaIedo7iia — Intervieiv '^^itH 
the hihahttants of the I/land of Si. Cr'h.cK- — Their 
Treachery — One of thefe Savages flightly pierces 
With an Arrow the Forehead of one of our 'Sea- 
me?i, who died fo me Time after in Confequence of 
the Wound — Singular ConfiruSiion of their Ca- 
noes — View of the Southern Part of the Arch'> 
peJago of Solomon — Interview) with its Inhabi- 
tants — Their Terfdy — The Northern Coaft of 
Luijiade reconnoitred — Intei'view with its In- 
habitafits — Dangers of that Navigation-^— Sail 
through Dampiers Straits in order to reconnoitre 
the North Coafi of New Britain — Death of Ge- 
neral 



Mat.] of la peroitse. 259 

neral Detitrecafleanx — The Scurvy makes great 
Ravages in both Ships — Death of the Baker of 
the Recherche — Cafi Anchor at JVaygioti. 



E 



ioth Mat. 
ARLY in the morning we fet fail from New 
Caledonia, but were no fooner in the open 
fea than we were becalmed near a long range 
of rocks, which we perceived to caftward, aaid 
againll: which the fea broke in a tremendous 
manner ; we however got clear of them, favoured 
by a light breeze from the fouth-eaft : failed by 
them in a longitudinal direction on the 1 1th and, 
1 2th, and on the ] 3 th defcried beyond that chain 
to the weft the ifland of Moulin, at about 1/ 
mi^-^s diftance, and afterwards the Huon Iflands. 

Next Gay our veifel was on the point of being 
dafhed to pieces on the rocks with which thefe 
iflands are furrounded, when at day-break we 
perceived the danger of our fltuation. We im- 
mediately tacked about and ftood off from them, 
and difcovered before the evehinp:; that thefe 
rocks were connecfled with thofe along which 
'we had failed the year before. 

Soon after we ftcercd for the ifland of Saint 
Croix, which, early on the morning of the 20th, 
we perceived to the north-weft, at about twenty- 
two miles diftance. 

Next 



SOO VOYA.GE IJ? SEARCH [l793. 

Next day, about four in the afternoon, being 
then three miles diflant from the lliore, we ]i.er- 
ceived two natives coming towards us in a canoe 
with an out-rigger. They kept at a great dif- 
tance till five other canoes hadjoined them, when 
they eame nearer to our fhip. One only of thefe 
canoes carried three favages, the others contained 
no more than two. They addrefled their con- 
verfation to us, and made figns for us to land 
upon their ifland, but none of them would ven- 
ture on board our fhip, notwithftanding repeated 
invitations to that effedl. The boldeft of them 
did not come nearer than about fifty yards. They 
were armed with bows and arrows, and their 
whole drefs confifted of ri&cklaces and bracelets 
ornamented with fhells. 

As night approached, our failors worked the 
fliip to {land on different tacks, when the favages 
left us and returned to the coaffc, but feveral hours 
afterwards, notwithftanding the darknefs of the 
night, we were vifited by another canoe, the fa- 
vages in which certainly thought that we under- 
ftood their language, for they fpoke to us for a 
long time in a very low tone of voice, but, not 
receiving any anfwer, they at length returned 
to their ifland. "' 

22d. At day-break we approached the coafl, 
and foon perceived twehe canoes making towards 

us. 



May.] of la perouse. 261 

us. They haftened alongfide of our veiTel, and 
th^ moft of them were loaded with different 
kinds of fruit, amongft which I remarked the 
bread-fruit, but of a fmaller Hze, and not fo good 
in quality as what we had met with at the 
Friendly Iflands; it was not, howxver, of the wild 
fort, for it only contained a very fmall quantity 
of feed. 

We were not a little iiirprized to obferve that 
thofe iflanders fet very little value on the iron 
which we offered them, though we could not 
doubt that they knew the ufe of it, for one of 
them had a piece of a joiner's chiffel with a 
woodea handle, of the fame kind as their ftone 
hatchets ; but when we fhowed them fbme 
pieces of red cloth, their admiration, expreffed 
by the words youU, yoidi, gaves us hopes of 
fucceeding better with thefe articles in bar- 
tering for their commodities than with our hard- 
ware. In fad: they confented to fell us fome of 
their arms, but probably fearing, left we fhould 
turn them againft themfelves, they took the pre- 
caution not to part with any of their bows, and 
even to blunt the arrows which they fold us. 

Soon after feveral of them gave us proofs of 
their difhonefty. With a view to cheat us of our 
articles in bartering, they at lirft offered a good 

equiva- 



262 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l793, 

equivalent, but infifled on having our goods de* 
livered to them before hand, which they k(;pt, 
rcfufing to give us any thing in return. 

About eight o'clock in the morning, the Ge- 
neral fent two boats to found a creek, which we 
perceived at about a mile dillance to the north- 
weft. On a fudden we loft fight of them, and 
were under fome apprehenfions refpecling them, 
when, about noon they appeared agam at the 
mouth of the creek, which they had been to 
reconnoitre. Several mufket-fhot fired from 
thcfe boats gave us to underftand that they had 
been attacked by the favages. At the report, 
the canoes which furrounded us made off with 
great precipitation. Our boats were not long 
before they arrived, and informed us that the 
opening which we had taken for a bay, was the 
extremity of a channel, which feparates the ifland 
of St. Croix from that of New Jerfey. This 
channel extends in length N. E. | E. being at 
the utmoft not three miles long, and its greateft 
breadth does not exceed one mile. It was founded 
with great accuracy, and a line of fixty-feven 
yards did not find the bottom in any part of it, 
not even withiil an hundred yards of the lliorc. 

A great number of canoes had followed our 
boats, whilft large parties of favages on the lliore 
endeavoured to entice our people to them, by 

Ihcwing 



May.] op la perouse. 263 

lihewing their cocoa-nuts, bananas, and jfeveral 
other fruits ; at length fome of them fwam off 
with thofe produdlions of their ifland in exchange 
for fuch pieces of cloth of different colours as 
were intended for them. 

Our boats on their return, at the entrance into 
the channel, and near a fniall yiila,2:e on the 
coaft of New Jerfey, were juft leaving thefe 
lavages, when one of them was iecn to Hand 
up in the middle of his canoe, and prepare to 
Ihoot an arrow at a man belonging to the boat 
of the Efperance. Every one feized his arms, 
but neverthelefs the illander recommenced his 
figns of hoftility, whereupon one of our men 
prefented his mufket, but the favage, without 
being terrified with this menace, bent his bow 
very deliberately and let fly an arrow, which 
ftruck one of the rowers on the forehead;, although 
at the dillance of about eighty yards. This at- 
tack v/as inftantly returiked by the difcharge of a 
mulTcet and blunderbufs, the latter of which 
having fent a ihower of bullets into the canoe, 
from w^hich the arrow had been difcharged, the 
three iflanders who were in it immediately 
jumped overboard. Soon after they returned to 
their canoe and paddled haftiiy towards the lliore, 
but a ball at length reaching the aggreflbr, all 
three again jumped into the water, leaving their 

canoe. 



254 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [17^3. 

tanoe, with their bows and arrows, which fell 
into the hands of our boat's crew. 

All thefe canoes have out-riggers, and are con- 
ftruded as reprefented in Plate XLVI. Fig. 3. 
Their bows are placed upon the platform, fitu- 
ated between the canoe and the out- rigger, and 
formed of clofe wicker work. The body of the 
canoes is in general fifteen feet long and fix in 
width. It is of a fingle piece cut out of the trunk 
of a tree, very light, and almofi; as foft as the 
wood of the mapou. There is 'through the 
whole length an excavation of five inches wide. 
Here the rowers fit with their legs one before the 
other, and up to the calf in the hollow. They 
are feated on the upper part, which is fmooth. 
At each of the extremities, which are formed like 
3 heart, we obferved two T's, the one above the 
other, cut out, but not very deep, and fometimes 
in relievo. The lower part of the canoe is very 
well formed for moving through the water. 
The out-rigger is always on the left of the rowers. 

Thefe ifianders are accufi:omed to chew betel. 
They keep the leaves of it with areca-nuts, in 
fmall bag's made of mattins:, or of the outer 

CD C 

covering of the cocoa-nuts. The lime w^hich 
they mix with it is carried in bamboo canes, or 
in calebaflies. 

Thefe people are, in general, of a deep olive 

colour 



May.] of la I^erouse. 26'5 

' colour, arid the expreffion of their Countenances 
indicates an intimate conned:ion between them 
and the generality of the inhabitants oi the Mo- 
luccas ; though we remarked fome who had a 
very black ikin, thick lips, and large flat nofes, 
and appeared to be of a very different race ; but 
all thefe had woolly hair and very large foreheads. 
They are in general of a good ftature, but their 
legs and thighs are rather fmall, probably owing, 
in a great meafure, to their inad:ivity, and the 
lensfth of time wdiich thev are confined in their 
canoes. 

Mofl of them had their nofes and cars bored, 
and wore in them rin2;s made of tortoife-flielL 

Almofl all were tatoocd, particularly on the 
back. 

I remarked with furprife that the fafliion of 
wearing their hair white was very general among 
thefe favages, and formed a ftriking contrail with 
the colour of their ik'in. Without doubt, thofe 
petifs mattres ufed lime for that purpofe> in the 
iame manner as I had obferved amongil the in- 
habitants of the PViendly Iflands. They are in 
the habit of pulling up their hair by the roots* 
Their notions of modefly have not taught thefe 
people the ufe of clothes. They generally have 
their bellies tied with a cord, which goes two or 
three times rotmd them. Their bracelets arc 

^^OL. II V S formed 



2^ \'OYAGE IN 3EARCH [l/O^- 

formed of matted work, and ornamented with 
iliells that have been worn ; thefe are fixed to 
different parts of the arm, and even above the 
elbow. 

The failor, who had been wounded in the head 
by the arrow, did not feel much pain from it ; 
he might have had it drefied immediately by the 
fiirgeon of the Recherche, but he chofe rather to 
wait till we fhould get on board the Efperance. 
No one would, at that time, have fuppofed that 
fo flight a wound would one day prove mortal. 

As foon as the boats were hoiiled on board the 
veiTels we flood to the fouth-weft, a quarter well, 
coafting the iiland gf St. Croix, at the dillance of 
about three quarters of a mile, and obferved m.any 
ot the favages call to, and invite us to land. 
Several amongft them launched their canoes to 
come to us, but we failed too fall for them to 
overtake us. 

We difcovered fome mountains, the higheft of 
which were at leafl three hundred yards perpen- 
dicular ; they v/cre all covered with large trees, 
between v/hich we perceived here and there very 
white fpots of ground, which appeared to be laid 
out in beds. 

From thence, after having failed, along the 
coafl about nine miles, we found ourfdves oppo- 
site to a large bay, which has, without doubt, a 

eood 



May'.] of la perouse. 267 

good bottom, but it is expofed to the fouth- 
call wind, which blew at that time. 

Wc loon after perceived at a diftance, to the 
Ibuth, feveral canoes making towards the iiland 
of St. Croix ; others were feen at a ftill greater 
diftance, apparently employed in fifliing in flial- 
low water ; at the fame time we defcried to the 
fouth another flioal very near us, and which ex- 
tended far to the weft ward. 

We had jufl: difcovered Volcano Ifland, when 
a great number of canoes left Gracious Bay, and 
made towards us, and as we had very little wund, 
they had fufficient time to come up with us. 
^We already counted feventy-four, which had 
flopped at the diftance of eight or nine hundred 
yards from the veffel, when the clouds, which 
had gathered on the mountains, caufed the fa- 
"vages, by wdiom thefe perilous veffels were man- 
ned, to be apprehenfive for their fafety if they 
remained longer at fca. They immediately pad- 
dled towards the Ihore, but before they had 
reached it a violent fquall, accompanied with a 

heavy fliower of rain, very much impeded their 
progrefs. 

We flood off and on all night. The General 
propofed to anchor in Gracious Bay the next day. 

Several fires were kindled on the coaft, to 
vidiich we were near enough to diftinguiili the 

S 2 voices 



2GS ^ VOYAGE IN SEARCH [^79^* 

voices of the inhabitants, who feemed to be call- 
ing to us. We fired feveral mufkets, intending 
to give them an agreeable furprize, and imme- 
diately cries of admiration were heard from dif- 
ferent parts of the coaft, but the moft profound 
filence fucceeded to thefe demonftrations of joy, 
although feveral other fliot were fired. 

23d. We did not perceive during the night, 
upon Volcano Illand, any indications that it Hill 
contained fubterraneous fire. This fmall ifland 
cannot contain a fufficient quantity of combuf- 
tible matter to fupply incefi^antly the volcanic 
fire, which Captain Carteret had obferved there. 
twenty-fix years ago. 

The fouth-eaft wind continued all that day, and 
even on the next (24th), prevented us from en- 
tering the Bay, near which a great number of 
cottages were built under the ihade of the cocoa^ 
trees, that were planted along the beach. 

The natives foon made their appearance on 
the fhore, when the General fent out two boats, 
following them with our veiTels, fo as to cover 
them in cafe of an attack from the natives. Th<e 
furf was too great to admit of our landing, ne- 
verthelefs feveral of the natives fwam to us, 
bringing cocoa nuts in exchange for pieces of red 
cloth, which they preferred before every other 
article we offered them. Some came in their ca- 
noes. 



May.] ^ OF LA PERousE. 26g 

noes, and all of them appeared very honeft in 
bargaining with us, which was perhaps owing to 
their having heard what had paflcd between us 
and the inhabitants of the eaft iide of the ifland. 
They, however, offered us only the word things 
they had ; niofl: of the cocoa nuts they brought 
were growing feedy. It w'as not till after fome 
time that they would fell us fome bows and ar- 
rows, but fearing left we lliould turn thefe arms 
againft themfelves, they took the precaution to 
carry the bows to one boat and the arrows to an- 
other. The latter were not pointed. We ob- 
ferved, that by means of a reddifh gum, a fmall 
piece of bone or tortoife-fhell," about half an inch 
long and well Iharpened, was fixed to the end 
of them ; others were pointed with the fame fort 
of materials from ten to twelve inches long ; but 
many were armed with the bone which is found 
next the tail in that ipecies of ray called raia 
pafl'inaca. 

We obferved feveral hogs on fliore, which they 
would not bring to us at any price, but promifed 
to fell them if we would come afhore. 

I remarked in their polTcffion a necklace of 
glafs beads, fome green and others red, which 
appeared to me to be of Englifli manufadlure, 
and which they agreed to exchange, 

S 3 We 



2/6 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l793. 

We bought from thefe inhabitants a piece of 
'^loth, which gave us no very favourable idea of 
their induftry : it was co'mpofed of coarfe bark of 
trees, and very indifferently joined together. 

One of them wore, fufpended upon his breaft, 
a fmall flat circular piece of alabaJAcr, which he 
parted with to fatisfy us. 

" This interview had lafted nearly two hours, 
when, at a lignal from one of their chiefs, all the 
favages left us ; but, when they faw our boats 
preparing to leave the ihore, the women came 
clofe to the water's edge to endeavour to perfuade 
us to land : we, however, continued fteady to 
our purpofe, in a fhort time got on board the 
veffels, and foon after fet fail for the Illands of 
Arfacides. 

On the 26th, about ten A. M. we perceived 
the Illands of Deliverance to the weftward. At 
noon V7e difcovered the fouthernmoft of them, 
between W. 13° S. and W. 19° S. diftant about 
twelve miles, and the other bearing W. 27° S. 
We found, by obfervation, that our veffel was in 
3 0M8'S. lat. and iCo'' 1 8' E. long. Almoft 
the whole circumference of thefe two fmall 
iflands is very rua'ged, but they do not lie very 
high. We perceived inhabitants upon them, 
and large plantations of cocoa trees. 

We 



May.] of lx perouse. 271 

We then crowded fail for the Arfacides, the 
loftv mountains of which we faw to the weft- 
fouth-weft. 

27th. We coaftcd along it this day. About 
ten A. M. we had jufh pailcd a llioal near two 
miles in breadth, when, through the negligence 
of the watch, the (liip went over another flioal, 
where, however, there was fortunately fufficient 
water to prevent her receiving any injury. 

At noon we were in lat. 10° 54'' fouth, and 
lung. 15 if 41'' tail:, when the land of the A^rfa- 
cidcs bore from ealt 2 1"" north, to weft 23° north : 
we were then about three miles to the fouth of 
the ncarcft fnorc. Thefe coafts were indented, 
having fmall hills projedling into the fea, forming 
a number of little bays, which atfordcd flielter 
from the caft wind. Moft of thefe fmall ^apes 
arc each terminated by a pyramidal rock of con- 
fidcrable height, crow^ned with a tuft of very 
green bullies. Farther in the interior of the coun- 
try we faw the fame kind of fmall hills ftanding 
on mountains of a moderate height, which ex- 
hibited a very pidturefque appearance. 

It VN'as generally at the extremity of the fmall 
creeks that the inhabitants fixed their reftdence. 
Many of them had come upon the beach to en- 
joy the novel fpedlacle which our veiTels prefent- 

S4 ed 



2/2 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l793. 

ed to them. Their cottages were built under the 
ihade of numerous plantations of cocoa trees. 

"We had not yet feen any canoes on that Coaft, 
when, about four in the aiternoon, one came to- 
wards us. We were much allonifh-ed that the 
iflanders who were in it durft venture out on a 
fea greatly agitated in fo frail a veflel, the width 
of which was not any where more than two feet, 
and they fat in the deepeft part in order to pre-r 
ferve a proper equilibrium. (See Plate XLIV.) 

After having approached to about two hundred 
arid fifty yards of our frigate, they addreffed a 
few words to us in a very elevated tone of voice^ 
pointing to their ifland, and inviting us to go on 
fhore. They then came ftill nearer, but a violent 
guft of wind compelled them to return to the 
fhore. 

Thefe iflanders had not more clothins; than 
the inhabitants of the ifland of St. Croix, to 
whom they bear great refemblance, 

28th. This morning at day-break we perceived 
that the current had driven us 18^ caft during 
the night. Our furprife at this was the greater^ 
as the eafterly wind, which prevailed at this 
time, fliould have countera<5led the force of the 
currents. Can the tides occafion this fnigular dit 
redion of the currents in thcfe latitudes ? 

* About 



May.] of la perouse. 273 

^bout ten in the morning four canoes came oiF 
the lliore and advanced to within about four hun- 
dred yards of our fliip, but we could not wait 
for their nearer approach, as we were obHged to 
continue our courfe to double a cape which 
woufd have interrupted fome nautical obferva- 
tions we intended to make. 

At noon we were in 10° 33^ S. lat. and 158° 
^"j' E. long, and we faw the fea breaking with 
great violence againft Cape Philip, which is a very- 
rugged point. We doubled it about four P. M, 
and foon after perceived a large bay, the fhores 
oi wdiich appeared to be very populous. Wc 
faw feveral flieds under which the inhabitants 
had put their canoes to flielter them from the 
weather, and obferved cottages in every part even 
to the fummits of the higheft mountains. 

Soon after the favages launched five canoes, 
and failed towards us. They all kept within call 
except one man, who, mounted in a catimarron 
canoe, came much nearer the ilern.of our vellel, 
to receive fome pieces of red cloth w hich we had 
thrown into the fea. His behaviour indicated the 
greateft miliruft. He kept his eyes fixed on us, 
none of our motions cfcaped him, and at the 
fame time he had the dexterity to catch every 
article that we threw him. The appearance of 
this native, featcd upon a few planks, beat about 

- by 



274 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [1/03. 

b_y the waves, amufcd us for fome feConds. Our 
mufician wanted to entertain thole illanders with 
fome tunes on the violin, but jufi: as he was 
tuning his inftrument, they went oi^"^ towards the 
Efperance. 

Soon after five other canoes came alongfide our 
veffel, teftifying the greateft confidence in us. 
The natives by which they were manned were 
certainly acquainted with the ufe of iron, for 
they expreffed great joy upon receiving fomc 
nails which we offered them. We could not 
learn whether thefe people are ufed to barter 
their commodities : at leaft we were not able to 
obtain any thing from them by this mode of 
traffic, although they had javelins, tomahawks, 
bows and arrows. They were, however, very 
■\villing to accept of any thing that we offered 
them by way of prefent, and made us very oblig- 
ing propofals if we would land upon their coails ; 
vvliilfi:, with their, natural gaiety of manner, they 
frequently repeated the word Jbi^Jou (the bofom), 
accompanying their difcourfe with very fignifi- 
cant geftures, which produced great merriment 
among our failors. 

At fun-fet the favages returned on fliore and 
kindled three large fires. 

2Qth. The currents had carried us during the 
night into a large channel which runs along this 

eafterly 



May.] of la perouse. 275 

caftcily ifland of the Arfacides,' formerly called 
the Ifland of St. Chriilopher, and belonging to 
the archipelago of Solomon, difcovcred by Men- 
dana. It now bore north, and foon after we dc- 
fcried the We des Contrarietes, which about noon 
bore E. 14° N. to E. 30° N. at a diftance of 
5,130. toifcs, we being in g" 5 3^ S. lat. 359° 8'' E. 
long;. This fmail ifland is rather mountainous 
and yery woody. 

We foon coafted along the fmall iflands called 
the Three Siilcrs, after w^hich we plied to wind- 
ward, in. order to get to the fouthward, fo as to 
pafs the llrait Vvhich feparates the ifland called by 
Mendana Guadal- canal from that of St. Chriilo- 
pher. 

About eight in the evening the Efperance 
came near enough to us to acquaint uS;, by the 
fpeaking-trumpet, of a piece of treachery which 
had been pra^lifed upon her crew by the iilanders. 
She had been farroundcd, during' the preceding 
night, by a great number of canoes, from which 
only two of the natives came on board. Thefe 
favages commended, in very high terms, the fruits 
of their ifland, and promifed to give a great quan- 
tity of them to our men, if they would come on 
fliore : at length they departed about midnight ; 
but amongll the number of canoes which remain- 
ed near the Efperance, one was obfcrved much 

larger 



2^0 VOYAGE IX SEARCH [l /Q3, 

larger than the refl, which, about break of day, 
rowed feveral times round the ^eilel, and lud- 
denly flopping, at leaft twelve arrows were dif- 
chars:ed from it, one of which wounded one of 
the crew (Defert) in the arm ; the greater part of 
the reft, fortunately, fticking in the fides of the 
lliip. After making this perfidious attack, they 
immediately fled w^ith precipitation, and were al- 
ready at a confiderable diftance before a niufket 
was fired at them : none of them were wounded : 
but a rocket, which was difcharged with a very 
good aim, and burft quite clofe to the canoe, ter- 
rified them exceedingly. 

The other canoes had likewife fled at firfl, but 
they foon returned to the vefTel. 

This ad: of treachery, and the perfidious con- 
dud of the fame favages to Captain Surville, gave 
lis reafon to believe that they had been aduated 
by the fame motives, w^hen they ufed their ut- 
moft endeavours to perfuade us to land upon their 
jfland. 

30th. Being fcarcely able to govern our vefTel, 
on account of the flightnefs of the breeze, which 
blew by intervals from N. W. and W. N. W., 
we were very perceptibly carried by the currents 
towards the Ifle des Contrarietes. As the fky 
was very clear, we had a good view ol the ifland* 
of which the engraving publilhed by Surville af- 
fords ^ 



II" 



"III', iV 

""i|(i 



''im 



'-'l''' Mm '"'l'''lliii)i ' ' in il! 

mw 



ill ''fell' 



■';1 il|i "[m^m 



'M 



lilllni, 11 '-it 



May.] of la perouse. 277 

fords a pretty cxad; reprefentation. We were at 
the diftance of 1,500 toifes, when a canoe rowed 
from the fliore, and came alongfide of our velTcL 
It was manned by fovir of the natives, who were 
very thankful for the prefents of ftuffs and hard- 
ware which we made them, and immediately 
gave us in return fome cocoa-nuts, which, Hkc 
moft of the natives of the Soutli Seas, they call 
■nmi. 

They appeared highly pleafed with the nails 
which we 2;ave them ; and continually besrced 
for more, frequently repeating the word mate 
(death), and endeavouring to intimate to us by 
their geftures, that they intended to employ them 
againft their enemies. Eight other canoes foon 
joined the firft, and approached our veffel with- 
out fliewing any figns of fear. We admired the 
elegant form of their canoes, which were exa(5lly 
fimilar to thole we had feen the preceding days 
at the cafterly part of the Arfacides. (Sec Plate 
XLIV). They were about twenty-one feet in 
length, two in breadth, and fifteen inches in dcDth. 
The bottom confiftcd of a fnigle piece cut from 
the trunk of a tree, and the iides were formed 
of a plank, the whole length of the boat, fup- 
ported by beams fixed at equal difiances into the 
bottom : at both ends other planks were attached 
to the firft, Thefe were ornamented on the 

outfide 



2/8 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l 793. 

outfide with figures of birds, fiflies, &c., rudely 
carved. The greater part of the canoes were ter- 
minated in front with the head of a bird, under 
which was feen a large bunch of fringe, coloured 
with a red dye, which appeared to me to have 
been made of the leaves of the vacoua. The 
other extremity of the boat was like wife orna- 
mented with red fringe, and here we frequently 
obferved, in the inner fide, the carving of a dog 
projeding from the vefTel, which led me to fup- 
pofe that the favages poflefs this animal. I was 
furprifed to obferve that they had given.it nearly 
the form of a blood-hound ; though it is probable 
they do not pofTefs that fpecies, but that the 
carving was nothing more than an impcrfc6l rc- 
prefentc^tion of the dog ufually met with in the 
South Sea Mands. 

The favages were obliged to remain conflantly 
at the bottom of their canoes, in order to jirevcnt 
their being overfet by the waves, and, what ren- 
dered their lituation ftill more incommodious, 
they had to fit in the water which was thrown 
in by the furge. They, however, took care to 
bale it out from time to time. 

Amongft the commodities which ^\ ere obtain- 
ed from them, was a long fifliing line attached 
to the extremity of a large rod, which appeared 
to me Ibmewhat remarkable, as the greater part 

of 



JU^E.] OF LA PEROUSE. 2^9 

of the favages we had hitherto feen, were in the 
pradlice of holding their fifhing Hnes in their 
hands. The hook was made of tortoife-flielL 

Some of thefe natives wore as ornaments, bra- 
celets made of various kinds of fhells ; others had 
them of the rind of the cocoa nut, befDan2;led 
throughout their whole circumference with a 
great number of coloured feeds. 

It does not appear that they chev/ betel ; at 
leaft I never perceived any figns cf their doing it- 
After thefe boats had remained feveral hours 
about our veifel, one of their chiefs gave them the 
fignal for departing, upon which they immedi- 
ately row^ed towards the coaft with great fpeed. 
One of the boats, however remained a fev/ mo- 
ments, to receive fome pieces of red cloth which 
we were about to prefcnt to the natives at the 
inftant when the iignal was given ; but as foon 
as thefe ifianders faw that their companions had 
left them behind, they plied their oars with all 
the fpeed they v/ere able, in order to overtake 
them. We were amazed to fee their canoe ilcim 
the waves with fuch rapidity, thcit it m'uft have 
run at the rate of at leaft 7,500 toifes an hour. 

June l ft. Early in the morning wx began to 
range along the fouthern coail of Guadal-canal, 
which defcends with a very gentle declivity^ to the 
fca, and obferved in the interior part of theiiland 

a long 



280 ^'OVAGE IN SEARCH [l/9^- 

a long chain of very high mountains, running in 
the fame direction. We foon diftinguiflied the 
Mount Lama of Shortland. The coaft was bor-^ 
dered with cocoa trees, under the fhade of which 
"wc obferved a great number of huts. The low 
grounds rendered a large extent of this coaft in- 
acceffible to our vefTels, and we were much in- 
commoded by the currents which carried us to 
caftward. This unexped:ed diredtion of the cur- 
rents furprifed us th^rnore, as the winds that had 
prevailed during our ftay in thefe parts 'might 
have been exped:ed to direcfl their courfe to the 
weftward. 

On the morning of the 4th, we doubled Cape 
Hunter, difcovcred by Stiortland. About ten 
o'clock we palled quite clofe to a fmall ifland 
connedled by fome reefs to the coaft, where we 
faw feveral groups of the favages feated under ?he 
fliade of fine plantations of cocoas, and bananas, 
which give this ifland a very pi(51:urefque appear- 
ance. A great number of canoes lay upon the 
beach, and we expe6led that the natives would put 
to fea with fome of them to come to our veftcls ; 
but their indifterence aftoniftied us : not one of 
them moved from his place, nor even rofe from 
his fitting pofturc in order to have a better view 
of our fhips. 

Thtf^ 



June.] of la perousjeT.''^ 2¥i^ 

This fmall illand is iituated in g°"^l^ S. lat' 
157° 19^ E. long. 

We foon came in fight of the wefternmoft 
point of Guadal- canal. 

On the /th, about noon, \vc defcried the largeil 
of Hammond's iflands, N. 4° W. to E. 0"" N. at 
the diftance of 5,130 toifes, -we being in 8° 4Q^ 
S. lat. 155° 9' E. long. We now left this archi- 
pelago, and made fail for the northern coait of 
Louifiade. 

The furvey which we had taken of the Arfa- 
cides, left us no room to doubt of their being the 
archipelago of Solomon, difcovercd by Mendana ; 
as had been fuppofed upon the fame grounds by 
Citizen Fleurieu, in hi^ excellent work upon the 
difcoveries of the French. 

On the 9th, the Efperance informed us of the 
death of an unfortunate man of her crew (Mahol), 
who had been wounded in the forehead, feven- 
tcen days before, by an arrow from one of the fa-^ 
Stages of the ifland Sainte Croix. The wound, 
however, had cicatrized very well, and, for four- 
teen days, the man had felt no troublefome 
fymptom whatever ; when he was fuddenly at^ 
tacked with a violent tetanas, under which he 
expired in three days time. 

Many of our company fuppofed that the arrow 
with which he was wounded had been poifoned ; 

Vol. IL T but 



282 VOYAGE IN SEARCH ' [l7Q3. 

but this conjed;ure appears to me improvable 
as the wound cicatrized, and the man reraained 
fourteen days in good heahh. Befides, we found 
that the arrows, left in the canoq by the favages, 
and afterwards taken poffeffion of by our failors, 
were not poifoned ; for feveral birds that we , 
pricked with them experienced no troubiefome 
confequences from the pundlure : but it is a cprn- 
mon occurrence in hot chmatcs, that the ilighteft 
puncture is followed by a general fpafmodic affec- 
tiouj, v/hich almoft always terminates fatally.^ 

On the ] 2th/ about ten in the morning, we 
defcried the coafts of Lrouifiajde, and at firft mif- 
took the moft caflierly extremity for Cape Deli- 
verance, but foon difcovered' that to be 25^ farther 
north. 

We were afloniilied to find that the rapidity 
of the currents had been fo great as to carry us 
44'' to the northward in the fpace of twenty-four 
'hours. The obferYatioris made on board the 
Efperance gave the fame refult. 

We now fteered weft, coafting along pretty 
high lands, from which, however, we were 
obliged to keep at a confiderable diftance, on ac- 
count of the great number of fhoals which ex- 
tended very far into the fea, and rendered our 
navigation extremely dangerous. 

On the 1 4th, at day-break, we found ourfelves 

furrounded 



June.] of la perouse. 283 

furrounded with rocks and fhoals, amongfl 
which we had been carried during the night by 
the currents from W. N. W. In vain we phed 
to windward with a very good fouth-eaft breeze, 
with a view of extricating ourfelves from this 
dangerous fituation ; the currents always pre- 
vented us from getting beyond a fmall illand fitu-^ 
ated to the north-eaft, at the diftance of 2,500 
toifes, near which there appeared to*be a pafTage 
into the open fea. We were then in 10° 58^ S. 
lat. 151° 1 8'' E. long. Our room for beating be- 
came more confined, and our fituation the more 
hazardous, in proportion as we were carried far- 
ther to the weftward ; befidcs, we found no bot- 
tom, fo that we were at length obliged to refolve 
venturing among th^ fhoals to the N. W. in 
hopes of finding there a pafTage for our vefTels ; 
but this refolution was "not taken till late in the 
evening. It was already night when we found 
ourfelves becalmed in a narrow channel, and at 
the mercy of a rapid current, which might every 
moment prove our deftruftion, by ^driving us upon 
the rocl^s with which we were furrounded. How- 
ever, at break of day we had the fatisfadiion of 
finding ourfelves in the open fea, extricated from 
all our dangers. Our fituation had undoubtedly 
been a very hazardous one ; but fince we had 
already traverfed feas full of Ihoals^ we were be- 

T 2 come 



284 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l/QS, 

come {o accuftomed to danger, that myfelf, as 
well as fevefal others of our company, went to 
bed at our ufual hour, and ilept as foundly as if 
wc had been in a ftate of the moft perfed; fe- 
curity. 

1 7th. The coafts, along which we had hitherto 
ranged to the northward of the iilands, were in- 
tercepted by a great number of channels. We 
had feen many habitations in this numerous col- 
lection of iflands, but not one of the natives. On 
the 29th, being in latitude ] 0° 8^ S. long. 149° 37^ 
eafl, and failing at a fmall diftance northward of 
a clufter of fmall iflands, we obferved fifteen of 
the natives coming out of their huts. Three of 
them immediately entered a canoe, and made to- 
wards us, but we failed fo fall, that they were not 
able to come up with our veflels. 

Another canoe foon appeared near the weftern- 
moft ifland of the group ; it was much larger 
than the former, and carried an almoft fquare fail, 
which being immediately loofcd, it foon came 
very near to us, but all our endeavours to perfuade 
the men to come alongfide of our veflel were in 
vain. They afterw;ards made towards the Efpc- 
rance, and having approached within a fmall dif- 
tance of her,, drew in their fail, and would not 
come nearer ; our velTels were then lying to, 
, Citizen Legrand, being very defirousof an inter- 
view 



June.] of la pejiouse. 285 

view with the natives, threw himfelf into the fea, 
and foon fwam up to the canoe. We were in- 
formed in the evening that this officer had not 
feen any arms amongll them ; and, that though 
they were twelve in number, they had Ihewed 
fome figns of fear w^hen they faw him approach 
them. 

It appears that they 'are unacquainted vv^ith 
the ufe of iron, as they feemed to fet httle value 
upon that which he prefented to them. 

Thefe iflanders were of a black colour, not very 
deep, and ftark naked. Their woolly hair was 
ornamented with tufts of feathers, and they wore 
cords bound feveral times round the circum- 
ference of their bodies, undoubtedly intended to 
afford a fupport to the mufcles of the belly. Many 
of them w^ore bracelets made of the rind of the 
cocoa tree. 

We admired their dexterity in fteering near 
the wind w^hen they returned to the Ihore. 

On the morning of the 18th, two canoes with 
out-riggers and fa.ils, each manned by twelve fa- 
vages, failed fwiftly round our veiTel, watching 
us with great attention, but at a confiderable dif- 
tance. They afterwards kept for a long time to 
windward of us. Wc were then in Q^ 53^ S. lat. 
14y° lo' E. long, There was every appearance 
of great population on the fbuthern coaft, and 

T 3 efpecially 



286 VOYAGE IN SEARCH ['1793. 

% ' « - . 

efpeclally towards the farther erxd of a large bay 
that Extends to S. S. W. ' We foon perceived 
feveral canoes rowing towards us, each manned by 
ten or eleven natives, who kept at the difiiance 
of about a hundred yards from our vefTel, till 
ibme pieces of cloth, which we threw into the fea 
for them, induced them to approach' nearer. 
They appeared much furprized at feeing a young 
black On board of our vcflel, whom we had 
brought with us from Amboyna. They did not 
underftand him when he addreiTed them in the 
Malay language. Thefe favages had all woolly 
hair and olive-coloured fkins ; I obferved, liow- 
ever, one amonfl them who. was as black as the 
negroes of Mozambique, and refembled them 
alfo in other particulars. His lower lip, as is the 
cafe with them, proje6ted confiderably beyond the 
upper. All thefe iflanders ufed betel ; and they 
were all flark naked. They wore bracelets orna- 
mented 'with fliells. Many of them had a fmall 
piece of bone paffed through the partition be- 
tween the noftrils; others wore a ftring of ihells 
like a fcarf over their fhouldecs. 

They prefented to us roots baked in 'the afhes, 
and carefully peeled. We obferved no other 
weapons amongft them than fhort javelins, 
pointed only at one end. 

Their huts were fupported fix or eight (cct 

above 



June.] of la perouse. '28'; 

above the ground upon ftakes, like thofe 6f the 
Papous. 

Thefe favages wilhed us to land upon their 
iiland, but obferving that we receded farther 
from it, in confequence of the currents which 
carried us to the weftward, they left us and re- 
turned to their coafts. 

Two of the canoes were ftill quite clofe to the 
Efperance at half after three o'clock, when we 
obferved three mufkets fired from that veflel, 
upon which the favages fled, rowing -with atl 
their might. We foon learnt that the men in 
one of the canoes had thrown ftones at the crew 
of the fliip without the leaft provocation having 
been given. None of the failors, however, had 
been wounded by this aS: of treachery ; and the 
mufkets had been fired only to terrify them. 

Soon after two boats were difpached in order 
to found feveral creeks along the coali, where we 
hoped to find good anchorage. — We found our- 
felves difappointed ; as it was necelTary to ap- 
proach within a hundred yards of the coaft, be- 
fore the bottom could be reached with a line of 
feventy yards ; and at the diftance of two hundred 
yards we could not ftrike the ground' with a line 
of lefs than a hundred and fixteen. 

Notwithftanding the fright which the mufkets 
fired at their companions might have given them, 

T 4 fome 



288 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l793:, 

fome of the natives came alongfide of our vefTel 
from the very place to which the others had made 
their efcape. They fhewed themfelves very 
•fraudulent in their dealings with -us, bargaining 
at any price for the commodities which we had 
to barter with them, and as foon as they had got 
them in their poffeffion, refufmg to give us asay 
thing in return. One of them, however, con- 
fented to give up to us a flute and a necklace, 
which are reprefented in Plate XXXVIII. Fig. 
20 and 27. 

I obferved one of the natives who wore, fuf^ 
pended from his neck by a thin cord, a part ot 
a human bone, cut from about the middle of the 
cubitus. Whether this might be a trophy of 
fome victory gained over an enemy, and thofe 
iiatiyes belong to the clafs of the canrdbals, lean-!' 
not tell, 

' Many of them had their faces fmeared over 
-with the powder of charcoal. 

They generally cover their natural parts with 
large leaves of vacoua, paffing between their 
thighs, and faftened to the girdle before and ber 
hind by a very tight ligature. 

They had with them fome pretty large filhing 
nets, to the lower end of which they had faftened 
various forts of fhells ; fome of thefe Ihells they 
carried in fmall cylindrical bafkets, furnifhed in 

the 



June,] of la perodse: 28^ 

the infide with cords feemingly intended to pre- 
vent their breaking. 

They ufed combs with three diverging teeth, 
fome made of bamboo, others of tortoifc-lhell. 

The favages left us at the clofe of the evening, 
and we pUed to windward during the whole 
night. 

We had fcarcely advanced more than 10,000 
toifes to the N. E. fmce the preceding evening, 
when we found ourfelves furrounded with low 
illands connected by fhoais, amongfh w'hich we 
were obliged to beat even during the night. We 
feveral times paffcd over fiats, which we could 
diftinguifli by the dim light of the moon, and 
often found ourfelves in lefs than ten fathoms 
water. 

A calm coming on about midnight, left us at 
the mercy of the current, which carrfed us to- 
w^ards the coaft where the favages had lighted 
feveral fires. 

At break of day w^e perceived the Efperance at 
a great difliance from us, and much nearer to the 
land than our vefiel, fo that fhe was obliged to be 
towed by the boats. 

The favages foon came in great numbers along- 
fide of our veiTel, but were not to be prevailed 
upon to come on board. An old man, who 
had already left his canoe in order to comply 

with 



2gO VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l793. 

with our invitation, was prevented by the reft, 
who eagerly pulled him back to them, as if they 
imagined him to be about to expofe himfelf to 
fome great danger. 

We thought that we recognized amongft thefe 
iflanders fome of thofe whoni we had feen on the 
two preceding days. They were very curious to 
know the names of the things we gave them ; 
but what furprifed us very much was^, that they 
enquired with the terms poe nama, which very 
much refemble the Malayan words apa namUf 
.fignifying '^ what is the name of this ?" They, 
however, underftood none of the men in our 
fhips, who addreffed them in the Malay language. 

Thefe favages brought with them a fort of 
pudding, which we found to confift partly of roots 
and the flefh of lobfters. They offered us fome 
of it, and thofe of us who ate of it, found it very 
well tafted. 

Moft of thefe iflanders made ufe of a human 
cubitus, fcooped out at the extremity, for draw- 
ing- the pieces of chalk which they mixed with 
their betel, from the bottom of a calabafh. 

They fold us an axe ihaped like that reprefented 
in Plate XII. Fig. g ; it was made of ferpentine 
ftone, very well poliflied, and hafted with a fmgle 
piece of wood. The edge of the axe was in the 
direction of the length of the handle, as in ours. 

Thefe 



June.] of la perouse. 291 

Thefe iflanders are very fond of perfumes; 
moll: of the things we got from them were 
fcented. They had pieces of the bark of dif- 
ferent aromatic trees, one of which feemed to mc 
to belong to the fpecies of laurel, know^n by the 
name oiilaurus cuJ'ilabaU, which is very common 
among the Molucca iflands. 

The calm flill continued, and about one 
o'clock the Commander fent the barge to aflaft in 
towing the Efperance, a^ the crew might be fup- 
pofed already much fatigued with their labour. 
At length, about half an hour after four a breeze 
fprung up from the fouth-eaft, which enabled 
her to get clear of the fhoals. The barge fooii 
returned to our veffcl, when we were informed 
that the Efperance had been furrounded for a 
long time by a great number of the favages ; that 
about noon they had pointed out to the crew two 
canoes rowing from two fmall iflands to meet 
each other, and given them to underfland that 
the iflanders in the boats v/ere going to fight a 
battle, and that thefe who came off conquerors 
intended to devour their enemies. During this 
recital, a ferocious expreffion of pleafure was vi- 
fible in their countenances, as if they were to par- 
take of this horrible banquet. After this com- 
miunication, almoft all thofe among our crew who 
had eaten of the pudding, which the favages 

brought 



292 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [1/93. 

brought them in the morning, were feized with 
retchings, from the apprehenfion that this food, 
which' feemed to be fo highly grateful to the 
iflanders, was partly compofed of human llefh. 

The two canoes were foon near enough toge- 
ther to commence the engagement. The com- 
batants were feen mounted upon a platform of 
wood, fupport^d by the out- rigger and the ca- 
noe, from whence they threw ftones with their 
flings,' each of them wearing a buckler upon his 
left airm, with which he endeavoured to ward of 
the "ftones thrown- by his adverfary. They, how- 
ever, feparated after a fight of half a quarter of 
an hour, in which none of them appeared to 
have 'been dangeroufly wounded, and returned 
to the fliore. 

The captain of the Elperance fent to the Com- 
mander a tomajiawk and a buckler which he had' 
obtained from thefe favages. 

The tomahawk was very broad, and flat at 
one of its extremities. The buckler was the. 
firft: defenfive weapon which we had obferved 
among the favage nations we had hitherto vifited. 
It was made of very hard wood, and of the form 
reprefcnted in Plate XII, Fig. 7 and 8. It was 
nearly three feet in length, a foot and a quarter 
in breadth, and upwa^s of half an inch in thick- 
ncfs. The outer fide was llightly convex. About 

the 



June.] of la perouse. 293. 

the middle'of Fig. 8, which reprefents the inner 
fide of the buckler, three fmall pieces of cane are 
viiible, by which the illanders fix it to the left 
arm. 

Though the natives had, been in great numbers 
about the Efperance, they had attempted no ad; 
of hollility, except that one of them appeared to 
be preparing to throw a javelin at one of the crew 
who was uDon the wale, but fceinjz; himfclfob- 
ferved, he defilled from his defign, and the canoe 
in which he was rowed away from the veffel with 
precipitation. 

On the following days we failed by fome very 
low fmall iflands, beyond which we faw very high 
lands to the fouthward. The prodigious num- 
bers of flats which we continuallv encountered, 
prevented us from ranging nearer to the coaft. 

On the '25th, being in 8^ 7^ fouth latitude, 146'' 
o(/ eaft longitude, we faw the hish srounds of 
New Guinea extending from fouth- weft to north- 
weft. After having followed them in their di- 
redlion to north- wefl, we arrived on the 27th at 
a deep gulph, about 40,000 toifes in extent, and 
furrounded by very high mountains, the loftieft 
of which are on the north fide, where they unite 
with that which forms the Cape of King William. 
The calm detained us here till the 20th, when 
•we failed for the flraits of Damplcr, 

Lrli 



2g4 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l793 

Oji the 30th, at break of day, we difcovered 
to the N. W. W. a very high mountain furrowed 
near its fummits by longitudinal excavations of a 
great depth. This was the Cape of King Wil- 
liam. We afterwards obferved the weftern coaft 
of New Britain, for which we fteered under full 
fail, in order to get before night to the north- 
ward of the ftraits of Dampier. The fun being' 
in our face, the man at the maft-head could not 
perceive timely enough a flat over which we 
p^fled about eight in the morning, the furge run- 
ning very high. After getting clear of this, we 
tliought ourfelves out of all danger ; but about 
three quarters of an hour after, we found our- 
felves between two fboals very near to each other, 
which inclofcd us in fuch a manner, that it was 
impoffible to pafs through with the fouth-fouth- 
eaft wind, which drove us farther and farther in. 
The Commander gave orders immediately to put 
about; but there was not time fufficient to per- 
form this manoeuvre, before our veifel drove to- 
wards the fhoals to the northward, where we ex- 
pected llie would foon be wrecked, when Citizen 
Gicquel cried from the maft-hcad that he faw a 
paffage between the rocks which, though very 
narrow, was yet wide enough for our veflel to 
fail through. We immediately fteercd for this 
pailage, and were at length extricated from one 

of 



June.] - of la perouse. 29s 

of the mofl hazardous fituations which we expe- 
rienced daring the whole courfe of our expedi- 
tion. We were, however, not yet out of all dan- 
ger, being ftill furrounded for fome time by other 
ihoals, which obliged us feveral times to change 
our direftion ; but we were at length fortunate 
enough to find a paflage through the narrow^ 
ftraits by which they were feparated from each 
other. 

About noon we were already very far up the 
ftrait, our latitude being 5° 38^ fouth, longitude 
140° 24' eaft. 

The coaft of New Britain bore from eaft 37° 
fouth, to eaft Gl ^ north, we being at the diftance 

of 2,500 toifes from the land. 

The illand on which Dampier difcovered a 
Volcano bore weft 38^ north, at the diftance of 
7,0oo toifes. This volcano was then extinguiflied ; 
but we faw, at the diftance of 5,130 toifes, weft 
28° north, a fmall ifland of a conical form, which 
was not obferved by Dampier to exhibit any figns 
of fubterraneous fire. A thick fmol^e proceeded 
at intervals from the fummit of the mountain ; 
and about half an hour after three, a great quan- 
tity of burning fubftances were thrown out of 
the aperture of the volcano, which lighting upon 
the eaftern declivity of the mountain, rolled down 
the fides till they fell into the fea, where they 

immediatelv 



296 A'OYAGE IN SEARCH [l793. 

immediately produced an ebullition in the water, 
and raifed it into vapours of a fhining white co- 
lour. At the moment of the. eruption, a thick 
fmokc;, tinged with different hues, but principally 
of a copper colour, was thrown out with fuch 
violence, as to afcend above the high eft clouds. 

We faw a great number of inhabitants along 
the coaft of New Britain, and feveral huts raifed 
upon ftones, after the manner of the Papous. 

We left the ftrait before clofe of evening. 

We now ranged ^long the northern coaft of 
New Britain, where we difcovered feveral fmall 
illands, very mountainous, and hitherto un- 
known. The currents in this paflage were fcarcelv 
perceptible, except under the meridian of Port 
Montague, where they carried us rapidly to the 
northward, which led us to fuppofe that we were 
oppofite a channel that divides the lands of New 
Britain. AVe left this coaft on the Qth July, 
after having been impeded in our furvey of it by 
the winds from the fouth-eaft, and the frequent 
calm5. 

We had been oblisfed for a lona; time to live 
upon Vv^orm-eaten bifcuit and falt-meat, which 
was already confiderably tainted, in confequence 
of which, the fcurvy had begun to make great 
ravages amongft us. The greater part of us found 
ourfelves compelled to leave off the ufe of coffee, 

as 



Aug.] of la ^erouse. ^^f 

as it occarioned very troublefome fpafmodic af- 
fections. 

On, the 1 1th we fteered very near the Portland 
lilands. 

In the afternoon of the 12 th we efpied the 
mofl: eafterlyof the Admiralty Ifles. 

On the 18th, about fun-fet> we difcovcred the 
Anchorites S. W. by W. 

About feven o'clock in the evening of the 2l{t 
we loft our Commander Dentrecafteaux; he fiink 
under the violence of a cholic which had attacked 
him two days before. For feme time he ha4 
experienced a few flight fymptoms of the fcurvy, 
but we were far from imagining ourfelves threat- 
ened with fo heavy a lofs. 

August 2d. we defcried the Traitors Iflands, 
and about noon we faw them at the diflance of 
20,000 toifes, from S. 35° W. to S 42° W. we 
being in 0' S. lat. 134^ S-'E. long. 

On the 8th our baker died of the fcurvy, his 
whole body having been previoufly affected with 
an emphyfema, which had encreafed with afto* 
nifliing rapidity, in confequence of the heats of 
the Equator. 

On the lith we doubled the Cape of Good 
Hope of New Guinea, and on the I Gth caft an- 
chor at Wavffiou. 

Vol. II. U CHAP. 




^9« VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l793. 



CHAP. XV. 

jihodc at Jfajgiou — Scorbutic Patients are fpeedily 
reUeved-—Litervieii's with the Natives — ^?tchor 
at Bourou — Paffage through the Straits of Bon- 
ton — Ravages produced, by the.Dyfentery — A^i- 

' chor at Soiirabaya — Abode at Samarang — My 
Detent'toJL i^^t Fort Anke 7iear Batav'ia — Abode at 

]. IJle de France— Bet urn to France. 

|URING our ftay at Waygiou we were fre- 
quently vifited by the natives, who brought 
US turtles, feveral of which weighed from 200 to 
240 pounds. They had mofhly been taken on 
the iilands of Aiou. The foup which we made 
of them afforded great relief to our fcorbutic pa- 
tients. When the natives perceived that we were 
in need of them, they made us pay for them at 
ten times their value. Thcfc animals continued 
to crawl about feveral hours after their heads had 
been cut off. The natives fold us likewife, turtle 
efipgs roaftcd and dried ; broiled turtle flefi:i, pul-^ 
lets, hogs, of w^hich they told as there was great' 
abundance in their woods ; oranges, cocoa-nuts, 
papayas, gourds of different kind^, rice, purflain 
(portidaca quadrtfidci)^ fugar canes, pimento, un- 
ripe cars of Turkey corn roafted, and the frefh 

iprouts 



Aug.] of LAPERousfe. 299 

iprouts of the papaya tree. They told us that 
the fprouts and unripe fruit of this tree were very 
good eating when boiled. They brought us alfo 
fago, made into a fort of flat cakes, three inches 
broad and fix long, which they ate without any 
farther preparation. Some of them brought us 
fago made into a fourifh tafted pafte, after having 
undergone fermentation. 

Moft of thefe illanders were naked all but 
their natural parts, which they cover with a coarfe 
ftuft", apparently made of the bark of the fig tree. 
The heat of the climate renders all other cloatli- 
ing unneceflary. Only their chiefs wear very 
"wide trow^fers and jackets, made of fluffs which 
they buy from the Chinefe, who, as they told us, 
came from time to time to anchor where we were. 
Some of them wore alfo bracelets of filvcr, which 
they had like wife bought of the Chinefe. Al- 
mofl all the chiefs of thefe favages had been at 
the Molucca Iflands, and fpoke the Malay lan- 
guage. Some wore hats made of the leaves of 
vacoua, of a conical form, and very like to thofe 
of the Chinefe. Others had their heads bound 
round wdth a fort of turban. They have all curled 
hair, which grows very thick, and to a confider- 
able length. The colour of their fkins is not very 
black. Some fuffer the beard on the upper lip 
to grow, and have their ears and the divifion of 

U 'I the 



300 VOYAGE IN SEARCI^ [l 79^ 

the nofe bored. Several of them fhewed us their 
dexterity in fhooting with the bow at a mark 
placed at the diftance of more than forty paces; 
and their arrows -always came very near their 
aim. Others were armed with very long lances, 
pointed with iron or bone. Thefe iflanders un- 
doubtedly know how to forge the iron, as they 
fet great value upon fome bars of this metal, 
which we gave them. Tin was likewife in great 
requell with them. But of all our commodities 
they gave a decided preference to cloth, particu- 
larly fuch as was of a red colour. 

The ifland Waygiou, called by the inhabitants 
Ouarido, is covered with large trees, and through- 
out mountainous, even at a very fmall diftance 
from the coaft. The huts were built of bamboo, 
raifed upon ftakes, about three yards above the 
ground, and covered with reeds. 

It is remarkable, that as foon as w^e had landed, 
thofe of our crew w^ho were the leafl; affedled 
with the fcurvy, or even fliewxd no lymptoms at 
all of that diforder, became affedcd with a con- 
iiderable degree of fwelling all over the body: 
but this fymptom, which had very much alarmed 
fome of us, difappeared entirely after w^alking 
three or four hours. 

During our ftay in this ifland I made very fre- 
quent excurfions into the forefts, where I colle<5l- 

ed 




J'eti ^ iy I S tori-Jolt .Ft'cntAiUy Js^^^priC/SfO. 



Aug.] of la I'erouse. 301 

ed a great number of new plants, and killed a va- 
riety of rare birds, amongll which was that fpe- 
cies of the promcrops which Buffon calls the 
promerops of New Guinea ; alfo a large pjkaccus 
aterrlmus, and a new fpecies of cako, to which I 
gave the name of the calao of the ifland Way- 
giou. Its beak is bent, of a dirty white colour, 
and about fix inches in length. Each mandible 
is unequally notched, and the fuperior is fur- 
mounted by a hood of a yellow colour, flat at the 
top and ridged. The wings and body are black, 
the tail white, and the neck of ^ lively red. (See 
Plate XI.) This beautiful bird is two feet in 
length, from the tip of the beak to the extremity 
of the feet. 

I faw feveral wild cocks in the woods. I'he 
female of this fpecies, which was brought us by 
the natives, was fcarcely larger thaii a partridge, 
and yet its eggs were as large again as thofe c£ 
our domeftic hen. This wild fpecies of the dung^ 
hill-cock is black, that which I had found in the 
forefts of Java was grey. 

The crow^ned pheafant of India fcohmha coro- 
nata) is very common in thcfe thick forefts, 
where we found here and there wild c«?ange treeSi 
the fruit of which furliiihed our fcorbUti<: patients 
with a very wholefome foft of-Ierftoii'ade. 

The natives told us, that the road-ftead where 
U 3 our 



302 VOYAGE IN SEARCH '[l 793. 

our veflels rode at anchor was infcfted by alliga- 
tors ; but this did not deter feveral of our failors 
from bathing in it. We afterwards found fome 
of the prints of their feet in the woods. It is 
particularly during the night-time that thefe 
animals are moft to be feared. 

Whilft we lay at anchor we were vifited by 
feveral of the chiefs. The chief of Ravak fupped 
and flept on board the Efperance the night before 
our departure ; but as foon as he faw preparations 
for weighing anchor, he threw himfelf into the 
fea, from the apprehenfion that we- were going 
to carry him away with us. We fhould have 
been furprifed at his harbouring fuch a fufpicion, 
if we had not been informed, that five months 
before the Dutch had carried off his brother, dur- 
ing an entertainment which they had made for 
him on board of their veilel. This chief v*'ore 
trowfers, with a very wide Indian cloak, and a 
waiftcoat of fatin. His eaj-rings were of gold. 

The inhabitants of this iiland had declared \var 
againft the Dutch, and the greater part of them, 
with the moft powerful of the chiefs, to whom 
they give the title of Sultan, at their head, were 
gone to unite with the inhabitants of Ceram, in 
order to attack the Goveffior of Amboyna, who 
w^as expelled there on his vifit to the Molucca 
Iflands. The inhabitants of the huts built ou the 

coail 



Aug.] of la perouse. ' 303 

coaft near our anchoring ftation, had provided for 
the fate t J of their women and children, by con 
dueling them, before their departure from the 
iiland, into the villages in the heart of the coun- 
try. The road-llead where our vcffels lay is called 
by the natives Boni-Saine. It is diftant about 
5,1 30 toifes to the eaftvvard of Ravak, and form-, 
ed by the coaft of Waygiou and a fmall ifland 
called by the natives Boni, which was eaftward of 
our ftation. We were here almoft under the 
Equator, our latitude being found by obfervation 
38" S. Our longitude was 128° 5 3' E. 

We took in our water towards the extremity 
of the road-ftead, at a pretty large river, into 
which our boats could enter more than 500 toifes 
from its mouth at low water, and twice as far at 
high water. 

The thermometer, as obferved on board, did 
not rife higher than 24'-', undoubtedly in confe- 
qucnce of the abundant rains. 

The barometer varied only from 28 inches 1 
line to 28 inches 1| line. 

The variation of the magnetic needle w^as i^ 
14^ E. 

The breezes were very flight, and varied only 
from S. S. E. to S. W. 

On the 28th we failed from Waygiou, and 
U 4 ranged 



304 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l703* 

ranged along its northern coaft, {landing to the 
<weft, in order to weather the wefterly point. 
We here met with a flat which is not indicated 
upon the charts, where the foundings gave us a 
depth of from four to eight fathoms, within* a 
fpace of abou: 300 toifes in length, which we 
were obliged to crofs. We obferved in different 
places, rocks almofl even with the water's edge, 
but were fortunate enough to keep clear of them. 
The greateft length of this flat is about 1 ,000 
toifes from north to fouth. 

On the ^th of September we caft anchor in 
the road- {lead of Bcurou, at the diftance of l,00O 
toifes from the Dutch fettiement, in a depth of 20 
fathoms, over a bottom of fand and mud. The 
Commander of this flation immediately fent a, 
corporal to us, to offer us a fupply of whatever 
frelh provifions we might have occafion for. A 
few minutes after we, obferved fome mufkets 
fired amojigft a herd of buffaloes that were w^alk- 
ing along the Ihore, and were informed that the 
Refident had ordered two of the fattefl to be killed 
for the ufe of our veffels. Well acquainted with 
the wants of navigators, he had fent us a great 
quantity of fruit, feveral bottles of an agreeable 
liquor extraded from the palm-tree, and fome of 
the young leaves of a fpecies of fern of the gemis 

ajplenium, 



Sept.] of la perouse. 305 

afplenium, which grows in mo ill: places in t^i-^ 
fhade ; eaten as fallad they are very tender and 
well-tafted. 

The Kefident, Henry Commans, was a man 
of great fimpHcity of manners, and very much 
beloved by the inhabitants. It was he whofe 
happinefs the Dutch of Amboyna defcribed, by 
telling us that he might ileep as much as he 
pleafed. We met with feveral perfons in his 
houfe who had feen Admiral Bougainville during 
his flay at Bourou, and who mentioned the name 
of that celebrated navigator with enthufiaftic ad- 
miration. 

This and the following day were employed by 
me in furveying the t.ifFerent diftridls of this 
illand, which prelents every where a very varied 
and pidiurefque appearance. The fago tree grows 
here in great abundance : it forms the principal 
fource of fubilffcence to the inhabitants, and af- 
fords even an article of exportation. Large plan- 
tations of it were feen near the Dutch eftablifh- 
ment, in marllies which render this place very 
unhealthy, particularly in the beginning of the 
fpring. The cayou pouti of the Malays ffncJa- 
lenca laufol'ia), grows in great abundance upon 
the hills. The llefident fhowed us a large alem- 
bic, which he ufes for diftllling the leaves of this 

tree. 



3O0 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l79^. 

tree, from which he procures every year a great 
quantity of the oil of cajeput. 

The iiland of Bourou produces feveral kjnds of 
wood proper for inlaid work, which arc in great 
requeft among the Chinefe ; and others ufeful in 
dyeing. Two Chinefe vcffels were run aground 
in the mud to the N. E. of the Dutch fort. The 
village near which the fort is built is called 
Cayeli, in the Malay language. Thofe of the na- 
tives who follow the Mahometan religion have 
a mofque, whofe roofs diminifhing in regular gra-* 
dation as they .rife one above the other, prefent a 
very agreeable appearance. (See Plate XLII. 
which feprefents a part of this village.) 

The coaft to the eaft of the village is watered 
only by very fmall ftreams, but about 2,500, toifes 
to the N. W. we went up a very confiderable 
river, called by the inhabitants Aer-Beflar, which 
difcharges itfelf into the road-ftead. This river 
is very deep, and for the length of about 2,ooo 
toifes, as far as we went up it, more than 70 feet 
broad. The ifland of Bourou undoubtedly owes 
its pofTeffmg fo confiderable a ftrcam to the great 
elevation of its mountains. On the borders of 
the river 1 frequently found the beautiful fhrub 
known by the name of portlandia grand'tfiora. 
The pebbles rolled from the mountains, which 

I found 



A. 




Sept.] of la perouse, 307 

I found on the banks of feveral rivulets, were 
fragments of rocks of quartz mixed with mica, 
and frequently of a fort of free fhone, w^hich like- 
wife confiftcd of quartzofe particles. 

Birds, efpecially parrots, are fo numerous in 
this illand, that it probably derives from this cir- 
cumllance its name, which fignifies in the Ma- 
layan language, a bird. 

The woods afforiifuch abundance of deer, goats 
and wild boars, that the natives can furnifh the 
Refident with as many as he has occalion for, at 
the rate of two mufket fhots fired at each. The 
fpecies of boar called babi-rouiTa fjiis babyntjjaj, 
is alio found here. 

The natives fcemed to be much afraid of feve- 
ral kinds of fnakes, which they told us were very 
numerous in their ifland ; but during the whole 
.of our ftay in this place, which I fpent almoft en- 
tirely i,n rambling through the woods, I never met 
with one of thefe reptiles. 

Although the rainy feafon had not yet fet in, 
violent llorms blew almofl every night from the 
high mountains. 

Upon founding the bay, we difcovered at its 
entrance, a little on this fide of the eafl: point, 
called Point Rouba, a Ihelf of rocks, at a depth of 
not more than a fathom throughout an extent of 
^bout 2,000 toifes ; but the rell of this fpacious 

outle^ 



308 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [1/93. 

outlet very deep, and that even at a fmall diftance 
from the M^eftern point, or Point LeiTatcUo, called 
by the natives Tangit'tou Corhau (Buffalo Point). 

According to aftronomical obfervations made 
at the village of Cayeli, its latitude was 3° 21^ 
54^' S. long. 125^^ 1' 0" E. 

The dip of the magnetic needle wd.s 20" 30^. 

Its variation, as obferved on board, was O" 54'' E. 

The higeft point indicated by the thermometer 
on board was 23°/ and on fliore 25° 3-lOths. 

The mercury in the barometer varied only 
from 28 inches 1 line to 28 inches 2 lines. 

The time of high v/ater on the full and change 
days was three quarters after eleven ; it then rofe 
to fix feet perpendicular height. 

On the i6th we failed from Bourou, fleering 
for the Strait of Bouton, which we entered on the 
afternoon of the 22d. 

1 /th. On the following day, about fun-fet, we 
caft anchor 5 1 3 toifes from the coaft, oppofite to 
the outlet of the channel which feparates Pan- 
gefani from Celebes. Roifel, who, in confequence 
of Dauribeau's being indifpofed, had now the 
command of the expedition, formed the projed: 
of failing out through this channel. Early in the 
morning of the 24th, he difpatched a pinnace, 
which reconnoitred the channel to the extent of 
iOjGOO toifes. A great number of fmall iflands 

were 



Oct.] of la perouse. 309 

were fcattered throughout the Strait, particularly 
towards the coaft of Celebes ; and both coafts were 
almoft every where bordered with marfhes. After 
this report many of our feamen thought there 
was reafon to apprehend that we might not be 
able to find a fufficient depth of water in every 
'part of the channel for our veil'els to pafs through 
it ; however we failed into it on the following 
day, and, after having proceeded about 10,000 
toifes eafi, anchored at the clofe of the evening. 

20th. The following day another pinnace was 
fent out to found throughout the whole of this 
paiTage. She returned on the 29th in the after- 
noon, with the intelligence that flie had found a 
great number of fand-banks and fome flats, very 
difficult to be difcovercd on account of their 
black colour, which rendered the paffage ex- 
tremely dangerous. It was therefore determined 
to return to the Strait of Bouton ; and after hav- 
ing been obliged to caft anchor, often feveral 
times in the courfe of a fmgle day, we at length 
arrived, on the 7th October, at its fouthern ex- 
tremity, and anchored near the village of Bouton, 
at the diftance of 1,000 toifes from the neareft 
coaft. 

We had fpent a confiderable fpace of time in 
paffing through this Strait, as we were obliged to. 
lie at anchor during the whole night time, and in 

the 



310 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l 7QS, 

the day to wait till the tide was favourable to our 
intended courfe, before we could fet fail. 
' During our pafTage the natives brought us va- 
rious forts of fruits common in the Moluccas. 
Some of their boats had a cargo of wild bread- 
fruit, the kernels of which, thofe who eat of 
them, found very indigeilible, even when roaft- 
ed. They brought usiikewife a great number of 
pullets, goats, dried and- fometimes frelh fifli. 
Moft of thefe natives would not exchange any 
of their commodities with us, before they had 
afked permiflion of the Commander of our vefTel, 
to whom they generally made a prefent. They 
informed us that a year ago they had feen four 
European vefTels failing through this Strait^ 
namely, tw^o from Ternate, the others from Banda 
and Amboyna. Thefe people trade w4th the 
Dutch. They preferred money to any other com- 
modity we offered them. Moft of them, how- 
ever, were very deiirous to procure pow^der and 
ball from us ; but when they found that we 
w^ouid not give them any, one of them offered us 
two llaves in exchange for a fmall quantity of 
ammunition, and appeared extremely furprifed 
that we did not accept of his propofal. 

Thefe iflanders brought us a great number of 
parrots, of the {pccics ^Ilacus alexaiidri and ^l- 
lacus cr'tftatus. 

We 



Oct.] of la perous^. 311 

We were much furprifed to fee them bring 
Ibme cotton fluffs, and thread made of the agave 
vhlpara, which, they told us, were of their own 
manufa<fture. 

I made ufe of the opportunities afforded me by 
our detention in the Strait to go on fhore. I 
found a great number of plants which I had never 
met with before : among others, the uviform 
nutmeg tree: defcribed by Citizen Lamark ; Its- 
fruit has no aromatic quality. I likewife colie<5ted 
the cynometra ramiftora the gyr'inocarfms of Gasrt- 
ner, and various fpecics oi calamus ^ which, after 
railing themfelves to the fammit of the talleft 
trees, delcend again to the ground, from whence 
they climb up others trees of equal height, their" 
ftalks frequently growing to the length of feveral" 
hundred yards. 

The fruit of the homhax ce'iha, and that of fe- 
veral new fpecies of the fame genus, affords 
abundant nouriiliment to the numerous troops of 
apes that are found here, fom.e of which we killed- 
in order to prefer ve their ikins. 

The moift ground exhibited almoft every where 
marks of the feet of deer, wild boars, and buffa- 
loes. We frequently found numerous herds of 
the laft-mentioned animals lying upon^ the wet 
ground; but they ahvays betook themfelves to 

Iheht 



312 VOYAGE IN SEARCIf [l7Q$t 

flight as foon as they faw us, and it was impoffible 
to purfue them through the mire. 

In the iiland of Pangefani I frequently tra-^ 
verfed thick forefts of the palm, known by the 
name of corypha umhracuTifera, where I found 
fqui'rrels of the fpecies called fc'iuru^ palntarumi 
which always fled at the approach of a man. 
- The natives had ere6led feveral fheds near the 
fliore, where they kept the bamboo hurdles, upon 
which they place their fifli when they dry them 
at the fire in order to preferve them. 

The iflanders, aware of the danger of living 
near the morafles, which render the northern 
coaft of Pangefani very unhealthy, have built no 
villages in that part of the country. It was in 
the .mid ft of thefe morafles that our crew became 
firft infected with a dyfentery of a vexy contagious 
nature,, which produced the greater ravages 
amongfl: us, as we were already much debilitated 
by the long ufe of bad provifions, which had be- 
come fl:ill more unwholefome during the courie 
of our voyage. I was alfo infe6led with this 
diforder which proved fatal to great numbers of 
our crew. 

8th. This morning at fun-rife, four chiefs, who 
bore the title of Oran-kai, came on board to no- 
tify to us, that we were not permitted to land, 

before 



Oct.] of la perouse. 313 

before the Sultana, who refided at Bouton, and 
was an ally of the Dutch Company, had been 
previoufly informed of our defign. We told them 
that we were very defirous of viewing this part of 
the ifland, and one of them went immediately to 
fignify our wifh to that petty fovereign. 

We wevQ foon vifited by two Dutch foldiers, 
who offered to procure us an interview with the 
Sultan, affuring us that without his permiffion 
the natives durft not fell us any proviiions. They 
then conducted us to their own dwelling, where 
we were informed that the Sultan would not be 
vifible till very late in the afternoon. Upon this 
intelligence a confiderable number of us took an 
excurfion into the interior of the ifland, diredling 
our route to the eaftward. The natives did not 
appear furprifed at feeing us, and fhewed no in- 
clination to follow us. 

After having walked for more than two hours 
along the banks of a fmall river, covered wrth 
a great number of boats, fome of v/hich had 
come from the flrait laden with fifh, we forded 
the ftream with a view of proceeding to the 
northward. We went up very fteep afcents, 
where I colle^ed a great number of plants; 
among others, the harleria prionitis, and fevera] 
new fpecies of the croton, 

Moft of the habitations in this part of the 

Vol. II. X country 



314 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l7Q^* 

country were built upon the fummits of delight- 
ful hills, with which this fide of the illand 
abounds. We met with a very friendly reception 
from the inhabitants, who prefented to us fruits 
of different kinds. One of them, who went to 
gather fome cocoa-nuts for us, climbed very 
qtiickly to the top of the tree, by means of an 
expedient which to me appeared fmgular. He 
tied his legs together near the ancle with a ftripe 
of cloth, by which he was enabled to grafp the 
trunk of the tree with his feet fo ftrongly as to 
fupport the whole weight of his body ; and, as 
the ilem was not very thick, by thus clafping it 
alternately with his feet and his arms, he very 
foon reached the top. 

We remarked fome forts built on the moft in- 
acceffible heights amongft thefe hills, which ferve 
the inhabitants for a place of refuge when their 
habitations are invaded by an enemy. Thefe for- 
tifications confifi: of ftone walls of confiderable 
thicknefs, and about ten or twelve feet high, in- 
clofing a plot of ground from fixty to eighty feet 
fquare. 

The natives who fold us ftufFs a few days be- 
fore, had not deceived us when they told us that 
they had been manufadlured in the iiland of Bou- 
ton. We faw to-day, in fcveral of the houfes, 
looms for manufaduring fimilar fluffs; the 

workmen 



Oct.] of la perouse. 315 

workmen performing their operations in a man- 
ner very like our linen weavers. They ufe cotton 
threads of various colours ; but red and blue ap- 
pear to be the moft in requeft among the natives. 

About four o'clock in the afternoon we went 
to the village of Bouton to fee the Sultan. We 
had not been informed that it was neceflary to 
bring fome prefents with us, in order to be admit- 
ted to an audience. As we had nothing to offer 
him, he was not to be fpoken with ; but his fon 
and nephew received us at the fort where he re- 
fides. They frequently repeated to us, with great 
emphafis, that the whole ifland was under his 
dominion ; that he was an ally of the Dutch 
Company, and that their enemies were his ene- 
mies. They then told us that the natives of 
Geram having lately invaded their'coaffs, four of 
them were taken and delivered up to the King, 
who immediately ordered them to be beheaded. 
They then deiired us to ftep a few paces further, 
and fliewed us, with an air of great fatisfadlion, 
the heads of thefe unfortunate illanders, expofed 
upon long poles planted on the walls of the fort. 

The village of Bouton is built upon an emi- 
nence with a very fteep declivity to the north- 
weft, and furrounded with thick walls which le- 
cure the inhabitants from the incurfions of their 

X 2 enemies. 



3l6 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l793. 

enemies. The houfes are built of bamboo, and 
their roofs covered with pahn-trefis, Hke thofe- 
of the other inhabitants of the Moluccas. 

The Sultan refides in a fort built of ftone. It 
appeared to us that this chief fhews grqat diftruft 
of the agents of the Dutch Company, though 
they are his allies ; for the three Dutch foldiers^ 
who were the only inhabitants of the Company's 
houfe, were not permitted to live in the village 
where he refides. They were obliged to remain 
in an inconvenient, ifolated dwelling, more than 
1 000 toifes diftant from his refidencc. They were 
foon to leave the iiland, and go to Macaffar ; but 
were ftill detained by the apprehenfion of meeting 
wdth the vellels of the natives of Ceram, which 
had been cruifmg for fome time in thefe feas. 

It was already night when we returned to the 
fhore in order to go on board. As it was then 
low water, we were obliged to wade in the fea 
up to our waifls, though the greater part of us had 
laboured under the dyfentery for feveral days, 
which was very much aggravated in confequence. 

During the day the natives had brought, for 
the ufe of our veiFels, rice, maize, fugar canes, 
pullets, eggs, ducks and goats. In exchange for 
thefe provifions they had been offered hardware 
commodities, but they preferred the money cur- 
rent 



Oct.] of la perouse. 317 

rent in the Moluccas, efpecially the fmall fil- 
vered coin which they call konpan per a, and which 
is brought over by the Dutch from Europe. 

The time of high water in this bay at full and 
change days, is about one o'clock in the after-, 
noon, the tide riiing fix feet perpendicular height. 

Our anchoring ftation was 5° 2"/ 8" S. lat. 
120° 27' E. long. 

On the Qth in the afternoon w^e weighed an- 
chor, and fleering under full fails to get out of 
the ftrait of Bouton, we foon reached the open 
fca. 

On the ] 1 th we paffed the ftrait of Salayer. 
A great number of canoes and natives wxre feen 
upon the beach, others were failing towards 
Celebes. 

We caft anchor feveral times along the coaft 
of Madura, and on the afternoon of the 1 Qth, in 
a bottom -of reddifh m.ud, at the depth of five 
fathoms, not far diftant from the north-weft point 
of the ifland, and at the entrance of the channel 
that leads to Sourabaya, one of the princlp^al 
eftablifliments of the Dutch in the ifland of Java. 
As we intended to come to anchor there, a pin- 
nace had been difpatched, about nine o'clock 
in the morning, to the village of Grifse, by the 
Efperance, to demand a pilot who could conduct 
us through the channel. 

X 3 Five 



318 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l793. 

Five days elapfed without our receiving any 
news of our pinnace. We were apprehenfive that 
Ihe had fallen in with pirates ; and, on the 23d, 
another was fent out, upon the fuppofition that 
the former had not arrived at the place of her 
deftination ; for we could not have imagined that 
file had been detained by the Dutch, who were 
well acquainted with the purpofe of our expedi- 
tion : but on the 25 th, we received a letter from 
the officer who had the command of the pinnace, 
acquainting us that he was detained prifoner by 
the Dutch, who were then at war with France. 
Soon, howxver, a meflage was brought us from 
the Council of Sourabaya, informing us that in 
purfuance of the in{lru<5lions which they had juft 
received from Batavia, they were willing to af- 
ford us every affiftance in their power ; and on 
the 20th two pilots were fent us. We were 
obliged to cafl anchor feveral times before we 
could get into the roads of Sourabaya, where we 
call anchor on the 28th, about 1,000 toifes north- 
ward of the river that runs through the town ; 
the flag of the fort bearing S. 2° E. and the village 
of Grifse W. 30^ N. 

The dyfentery had already carried off -fix of our 
crew fmce our departure from Bouton. 

3 ifti, We foon obtained permifiion to refide in 
the town of Sourabaya, where I procured a lodg- 
ing 



Nov.] OF LA PEROUSE. 31Q 

ing in the houfe of MeiTrs. Bawer and Stagh, 
who received me with the greateft cordiaUty. 

November loth. The council revoked the 
permiffion they had granted us, and all our com- 
pany were immediately obliged to return on 
board, with the exception of our invalids, to which 
number I belonged, the dyfentery having left mc 
in a ftate of extreme debility. Being now re- 
moved from the reft of my fcllow-fufferers in this 
contagious malady, I was very much relieved by 
the ufe of purgatives, fago, and fkimmed milk ; 
and in a fliort time completely recovered. 

It was high time that this captivity Ihould have 
an end ; for the number of lick perfons on board 
increafed with alarming rapidity.' Almoft one 
half of the crew were attacked with dyfentery 
and contagious fevers, which did not abate of 
their violence till they had carried off feveral of 
our men. At length the Council again granted 
the permiffion which they had revoked a few days 
before, and we had the fatisfaclion of meeting 
again together in the town. 

The heat was exceffive during- the firft days of 
our ftay at Sourabaya. I was aftonifhed to fee 
Reaumur's thermometer rife to 27^; but thefe 
burning heats vvxre but of fhort duration ; for 
the change of the monfoon, which took place 
about the beginning of November, caufcd for 
. X 4 a con- 



320 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l793. 

a confiderable time, efpecially in the afternoon, 
abundant falls of rain, which cooled the atmof- 
phere to fuch a degree, that the thermometer 
did not ftand higher than 22" or 23^, in the hot- 
teft part of the day. 

As foon as my health was a little re-eftabliflied, 
I made frequent excurfions in the environs of the 
town, and as far into the country as my ftrength 
permitted me. I had the pleafure of feeing my 
colle<5lions of natural hiflory encreafe with a great 
number of fpecimens which I had never before 
met with. 

Moil of the roads to a confiderable diflancc 
frorn Sourabaya are fhaded by hedges of bamboo. 
Others were inclofed between long avenues of 
mhnufops eleng't, gutllandlna morlnga, nauclea ori- 
ent alls, hyhifcus t'lliaceus, &c. the fliade of which 
produces a very falutary efFed: in this fervid cli- 
mate. 1 was much furprifed to fee the laft men- 
tioned tree fend out branches from the whole 
length of its trunk, as far down as the root ; dif- 
fering in this refped from all of the fame fpecies, 
that I had feen in other places, but I foon ob- 
ferved fome of the Javanefe employed in making 
inciiions very clofe to'each other in the bark of the 
trees with a largq knife, and was informed that 
this operation has been pra^lifed here from time 
immemorial for the purpofe of caufing young 

fhoots 



Pec] of la perouse. 321 

flioots to fprout from the places cut in this man- 
ner. They always choofe the rainy feafon for per- 
forming this operation, as it fucceeds with moft 
certainty at that period. Vegetation is then fo 
rapid in this climate, that a very fhort time after 
the incifions had been made, I faw them filled 
with a vail number of young buds. The inha- 
bitants of this ifland are, however, in general, but 
little {killed in the agricultural arts. 

On the 12th of December, thofe of us who 
w^ere engaged in the purfuit of natural hiflory, 
obtained permiffion from the Governor of Soura- 
baya to vifit the mountains of Prau, iituated at 
the diftance of about 30,000 toifes wefl-fouth- 
wefl of the town. 

On the following day we fet out for the village 
of Poron, fituated near'the foot of the mountains. 
The Javanefe who carried our baggage, fufpended 
it to long poles of bamboo, each borne between 
the flioulders of two men. 

Having proceeded about 20,000 toifes, we ar- 
rived at Sonde Kari, where we dined after the Ja- 
vanefe fafhion with the chief of the village, who 
had ordered a fumptuous repaft to be prepared for 
us. It confifted of feveral difhes of broiled fifh, 
and the flefh of buffaloes and horfes that had been 
preferved, as we were told, for fix months, by 
being cut into thin llices, and dried in the fun. 

All 



322 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l7Q3, 

All the difhes were feafoned very highly with pep- 
per, pimento and ginger. Rice ferved ns in the 
place of bread, and the entertainment concluded 
with a plentiful defert of excellent fruit. 

We foon fet forward on our journey, and were 
overtaken by a heavv rain, which put us to great 
inconvenience. A ferjeant of the Dutch troop 
gave us a proof of his authority over the Java- 
nefe, who returned to the village we had left, by- 
taking out of their hands the umbrellas which 
they had brought with them ; none of them dar- 
in2; to refift. We did not know what he intended 
to do with them, till he came up and offered 
them to us, faying, that he thought it very pre- 
sumptuous in thefe men to fhelter themfelves 
from the rain, while they faw us expofed to it; 
but to his great furprife, none of us would make 
ufe of the umbrellas, but delired him to return 
them to the owners. ^ 

At length we arrived at the village of Poron, 
where we were received by the chief, who bears 
the title of Deman. His principal office is to ap- 
portion to the natives their daily tafks of labour. 

The country through which we had paffed is a 
v^ft plain, in which rice is principally cultivated. 
The plantations were already covered with fix or 
eight inches of water, retained by the earthen 
mounds with which they w^ere furrounded. 

Before 



Dec] of la perouse. 323 

Before we arrived at Sonda Karl, we had ob- 
ferved large plantations of indigo. This article 
is principally cultivated in Java by the Chineie, 
who have a much more extenfive acquaintance 
with the arts than the natives. _ 

We faw likewife fevcral fields in which the 
rtchius commums was cultivated^, from the feeds of 
which the Javanefe extracfl a kind of lamp-oil. 

This plam contains alfo a few plantations of 
maize, fugar canes, and the holcus forghum. 

We ipent the night in a very neat houfc, built 
of bamboo, which ftood clofe by that of the De- 
man. 

14th. On the following day we baited at the 
weft extremity of tiie fame village upon lands un- 
der thejurifdi(l;tion of the Tomogon of Bangui!, 
who, though he refided at the diftance of more 
than 7>500 toifes from thence, came eady in the 
morning to give orders to the inhabitants to pro- 
vide for our fafety, and furnifh us with whatever 
eatables we might want. 

The Tomogon was a man of much good fenle, 
fpoke the Dutch language very well, and had a 
competent knowledge of the affairs of Europe. 
He was a Chinefe by birth, but had embraced 
the Mahometan religion in order to obtain the 
title of Tomogon. 

We were extremely fatigued with the journey 

we 



324 VOYAGE IIS" SEARCH [17Q3. 

we had made the preceding day upon the fmall 
horfes common in this iiland. Their very hard 
trot galled us the more, as the faddles we were 
obliged to make ufe of were not ftufFed, but con- 
fined of a very hard kind of wood, with a thick 
piece of fkin glued on for their only covering. 
Befidcs, the Javanefe ftirrups were too fhort for 
us, -and could not be lowered, which rendered our 
pofture extremely uneafy. We therefore went 
very little from our habitation during this day, 
but on the following (l5th), we pafled over a 
plain about 2,500 toifes in length, and for the 
greater part already covered with water, before 
we arrived at the mountains of Prau. The To- 
magon of Banguil came to this place dn horfe- 
back,' accompanied by upwards of a hundred at- 
tendants, very well mounted. We found him 
in the forefl, where he waited for us ; but, having 
probably very little idea of the fimpl^ mode in 
which naturalifls choofe to travel, he had made 
his men bring chairs with them for us to fit down 
upon at the top of one of the rhountains, from 
whence we had a view through the trees of a 
great extent of country, which he told us was all 
in his dependency ; and, to imprefs it the more 
ftrongly upon our minds, he immediately ordered 
the tops of feveral tek-trees to be ftruck off; but 
we faw with regret more than ahundred feet of 

the 



Dec] of la perouse.- 325 

the trunks of thefe beautiful trees deftroyed and 
facrlficed to fuch a momentary gratification. 

Peacocks were very common in thefe forefts 

through which we rambled in every dire<5lion, and 

we fhot feveral of them. Amongft other plants, 

I collected feveral beautiful fpecies of uvar'my he- 

Je^ieres and hauhhila. 

The natives were employed in clearing a fine 
piece of ground at the foot of the eaftern moun- 
tains. The fmaller trees they cut down with 
axes ; the larger they only Gripped of their bark 
near the root, in order to make them decay. 

In the afternoon a diftant found of thunder 
ulhered in a violent fall of rain, as is ufual at this 
feafon, w^bich compelled us to hafiien back to our 
habitation. The Tomagon, before he returned 
to Banguil, repeated the orders he had already 
given to the natives, to provide for our fafety and 
our wants. 

On the following days we vifited the moun- 
tains of Panangounan, penetrating into the terri- 
tory of the Emperor of Solo through vafi: forefts 
of tek- trees, under the fhade of which^the paji- 
crathitn amhoine?i/e grew in abundance. Our 
guides often exprefied their fear of meeting with 
tigers, which, they told us, were very common 
in the thickets on the banks of the rivers, where 
they lie in wait for the animals that come to 

drink. 



326 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l7Q3- 

drink. We, however, met with none of thefe 
beafts of prey. 

The Javanefe who accompanied us were aI-» 
moft continually on horfeback, and did not dif* 
mount even in the moft inacceffibie parts of the 
foreft ; but whenever they faw the plant, called 
in their language ladiaPankru they immediately 
threw themfelves on their feet, and ran as faft as 
they were able to gather it, trying to outftrip 
each other. Their eagernefs raifmg our curiofity 
to know the caufe of their valuing this plant fo 
highly, we were informed that the knobs of its 
roots, dried and reduced to powder, were a power- 
ful aphrodiiiac. It appears that thefe auxiliary 
medicines are much efteemed amongft this peo- 
ple, as, indeed, they generally are amongft the in- 
habitants of hot climates. This paraiite plant is 
only to be foiind upon the trunks of large trees. 
It was not yet at its period of fru£lification ; 
however, it appeared to me to be a new fpecies 
of the pothos. 

During thefe excurfions I killed feveral wild 
cocks, whofe plumage was diverfified with a va- 
riety of colours of admirable brilliancy. Their 
crowing, which we often heard in the midfl of 
the woods, led us at firft to imagine that we were 
in the vicinity of fome habitation, but we fbon 
learnt to diflinguifh their note perfectly well 

from 



Dec] of la perouse. 327 

from that of the domeflic cock. The comb of 
the wild cock is not red, but of a whitifli colour, 
with a flight tinge of violet, which grows fome- 
what deeper towards the edges. The greater part 
of the fwamps in the neighbourhood of our dwell- 
ing were covered with very large leaves of the 
nymphea nelunibo, upon which we frequently ob- 
ferved a fpecies of bird fimilar to that called 
parra Jtnenjis ; and admired the lightnefs with 
which it walked over the furface of the w^ater, 
ftepping with its long legs from one leaf to the 
other. 

At a fmall diflance weftward of the village of 
Porou, we faw two coloflal ftatues, called by the 
Javanefe reSiio, and in high veneration amongft 
them. They were both hewn out of blocks of 
ftone eleven feet high ; their drapery was very 
wide, and the phyfiognomy of the tw^o heads bore 
a Moorifh chara(5ler. To me . it appeared pro- 
bable that thcfe ftatues had been ereded in ho- 
nour of fome of the Moorifli conquerors of the 
Moluccas ; but the natives could give us no in- 
formation upon this head. 

The Dutch fcrjeant who accompanied us was 
a paffionate admirer of the mufic of the Javanefe. 
Soon after our arrival at Porou, he fent for a fe- 
male fmger, whofe fhrill voice was accompanied 
by two muficians, who played every evening upon 

inftruments, - 



328 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l7Q3' 

initruments, one of which refembled a dulci- 
mer, and the other a mandolin. Whilft we were 
employed in preparing and defcribing our collec- 
tions, we were obliged to hear, for feveral hours 
together, this difcordant mufic, which, however, 
had always charms fufficient to attract a great 
concourfe of the. natives round the performers. 

All the airs W^re fung in the Javanefe lan- 
guage. They generally turned upon the fubjedl 
of love, as our ferjeant, who underftood the Ja- 
vanefe language perfe^ly well, interpreted them 
to us. He told us that thefe airs were jail im* 
fromptii as thofe fung by the fmging-women of 
Java generally are. Ours accompanied her voice 
with a variety of geftures appropriate to the fub- 
jecfl, and efpecially with certain movements of 
her fingers of very difficult execution, which 
were much applauded by the natives. If report 
does not do them injuftice, thefe iinging-wornen 
are not diftinguiilied by any extraordinary rigidity 
of virtue. 

On the 20th we returned to Sourabaya. 

Citizen Riche and I had formed a plan of 
Ipending fome time among the mountains of 
Paffervan, to which we had approached, very near 
during our laft excurfion. They are very high, 
and we had often heard their fertility much 
ipoken of. Grain is cultivated there with great 

iuccefs. 



Feb.] of la perouse. 320 

fuccefs. Many European fruit-trees likewife fuc- 
ceed very well upon thofe heights, on account of 
the mild temperature of their atmoiphere. It 
Was neceflary for us to procure a new order from 
the Governor before wx could undertake this ex- 
pedition ; but Dauribeau, who had offered to re- 
queft it for us, brought us information that the 
Governor had Ihortly received new in{trud:ions 
from the Council at Batavia, according to which 
he could not permit us to go to any great diftance 
from the town ; a walk of three or four hours, 
being all that was allowed us. ' I went feveral 
times to fee a fpring fituated at the diftance of 
about 7,500 toifes to the weft ward. A great 
quantity of petroleum rifes to the furface of its 
water, and is carefully collected by the inhabi- 
tants, who mix it with pitch. Abundance of 
pumice-ftone is found in the furrounding country. 

Citizen Riche and I lodged in the fame houfe^ 
We generally went out together to purfue our 
refearches, and returned in the evening to Sou- 
rabaya with the new fpecimens we had colledled. 
It was always with regret that we found our la- 
bours fufpended by the approach of night. But 
on the igth of February 1 794, about four o'clock 
in the morning, Chateauvieux, the commandant 
of the place, came with a troop of thirty foldicrs 
under arms, to inform us, in the name of Dauri- 

VoL.IL y beau 



^30 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l 794. 

beau and the principal officers of our expedition, 
-jthat we were under arrefl. Shortly after we 
learnt that feveral others of our companions had 
Ihared the fame fate, without being able to di- 
vine the caufe of fo arbitrary an a6l of autho- 
rity ; but we were foon informed that intelligence 
which Dauribeau had received from Europe, had 
determined him to hoift the white flag, and put 
himfelf under the protection of the Dutch, who 
were then at war with France. He had un- 
doubtedly already then formed the projed;, which 
he afterwards carried into execution, of felling 
the veiTels of our expedition. To infure his fuc- 
cefs, it was neceflary for him to get rid of all 
thofe perfons under . him who he knew would 
ftrongly difapprove of fuch a meafure. We were 
therefore delivered into the hands of the Dutch 
as prifoners of war, to the number of feven, 
namely, Legrand, Laignel, Willaumez, Riche, 
Ventenat, Piron, and myfelf, and conduced to 
Samarang by a march of 200,000 toifes, over 
roads bad in the extreme, and in the rainy feafon. 
We- wefe obliged to ufe boats to crofs feveral 
large plains, inundated by the torrents defcending 
from the mountains fituated to the fouthward, 
and which form a part of the great chain which 
runs through the whole iiland of Java from eaft 
to weft. • » 

Michel 



March.] of la perouse. 331 

Michel Sirot and Pierre Creno, fervants on 
board the Efperance, followed us in our profcrip- 
tion. 

Dauribeau had robbed me of all my collections. 
When we left Sourabaya, I had intrufted to the 
care of Lahaie, the gardener, eleven bread-fruit 
trees, and an equal number of the roots and 
ftems of this valuable plant, kept in clay in per- 
fect prefervation, and fit to produce as many 
young trees. He promifed to take the beft care 
of them, and gave me a receipt for the depoiit. 

The greater part of the crews were thrown into 
the prifons of the Tomagon of Sourabaya, from 
whence they were taken out fome time after, 
part to be fent into thofe of Batavia, and .part to 
remain with Dauribeau. 

We left Sourabaya on the 24th of February. 

This town is fituated in' 7° 14^ 28" fouth lat. 
110° 35^ 43'' eaft long. 

The variation of the magnetic needle was 
2° 31^ 14'' weft, and the diftance 25°. 

After a long courfe of fatigue we at length ar- 
rived at Samarang, on the morning of the ] ith 
March. 

The, Commandant of the place immediately 
condud:ed us to Governor Ovcrllraaten. The 
Governor told us that the firft furgeon of the 
hofpital had got a lodging prepared for us, and 

Y2 fent 



332 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l7Q4. 

fent us to take poiTeflion of it ; but what was 
our furprife, when, having been introduced to 
the furgeon, he led us into one of the wards 
of his hofpital, where he fhewed us feven beds, 
which he faid had juft been made ready for us. 
There was neither table nor chairs in this place. 
It was in vain that we reprefented to him that 
we were not fick, and did not wifh to become 
fo by living in an hofpital : his anfwer always 
was, that, according to the orders of his Excel- 
lency the Governor, he had no other lodging to 
offer us. 

We were obliged at laft to appeal to the Go- 
vernor, and to make him fenfible, if poffible, of 
the harflmefs of fuch a mode of proceeding with 
refpe<5l to men, who, upon their return from a 
long and toilibme expedition, undertaken for the 
advancement of the arts and fciences, had a right 
to exped: a better reception from a civilized na- 
tion. It was not, however, till after parleying 
for feveral hours, that the order for our impri- 
ibnment in an hofpital was reverfed. We were 
now^ permitted to live in the centre of the town, 
and this was our prifon. 

Some time after we obtained permiffion to go 
to the diftance of about 2,500 toifes from Sama- 
rang, but with the reftridion that we fhould not 
approach the fea-coaft. 

During 



March.] of la perouse. 333 

During our march from Sourabaja to Sama- 
rang, I had been furprifed to obfervc in the 
market places of feveral villages, fhops where 
fmall flat fquares of a reddifti clay, called by the 
inhabitants tmia ampo, were expofed for fale. At 
firft I imagined that they might be employed for 
fulling cloths ; but I foon obferved the inhabitants 
chewing fmall quantities of this clay, and they 
affured me that this was all the ufe they made of 
it. 

Whilft we were paffing through the extenfivc 
rice plantations at the foot of the mountains, the 
natives had frequently pointed out to us, fields of 
rice upon declivities too fteep to be able to retain 
the water. The rice cultivated in thefe places 
was of a fpecies, that does not require an inun- 
dated foil to fuccced perfectly well ; but they only 
cultivate it in the feafon when the land is daily 
drenched with copious rains. 

I had already remarked upon feveral hills in 
the illand of Java, a great number of cocoa-trees 
which were ftripped of their leaves and dead at 
the root. It had appeared very lingular to me'^to 
find fo great a number within fo fmall a fpace ; 
but I was at length informed, by feveral of the 
inhabitants of the hills fituated at a little diftance 
north-weft of Samarang, where I faw many co- 
coa-trees in the fame condition, that they had 

Y 3 been 



334 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l794. 

been ftruck by lightning, and they informed me 
that the fame circumftance frequently happens 
upon many other hills in the ifland. In facft, 
thefe high trees are particularly expofed by their 
fituation, to the terrible effecfls of the lightning ; 
befides, the fap, with which they abound, con- 
tributes in a great degree to attrad; the ele(ftric 
matter. 

On the 5th of April, we were informed that a 
packet was fhortly to fail from Batavia for Eu- 
rope. The Governor of Samarang was willing 
that two of us fhould go to Batavia, to folicit 
permiffion of the Regency for themfelves to re- 
turn in this veiTel. As we were all animated by 
the fame defire of revisiting our native country, 
we agreed to cafh lots. The fortunate perfons 
were Citizens Riche and Legrand, and on the 
0th of May they fet out for Batavia. 

Twelve days after we received orders, from the 
Governor of Samarang, to go to the fame place, 
and there. to wait for another opportunity of re- 
turning to France, than that of the packet above 
mentioned ; for it was even very uncertain, whe- 
ther or not Riche and Legrand would find a place 
in it. 

Some of the Dutch who were interefted about 
us, informed us that the fleet, upon which our 
hopes of returning to Europe depended, was not 

to 



May.] of la perouse. 555 

to fet fail in lefs than fix or feven months, and 
theyalTured us, that before that period it wds not 
probable we fhoiild meet with any other oppor- 
tunity of returning to our native country. The 
dyfentery which I had (taught among the marfhes 
of Strait Bouton, made me apprelierif vc that a 
relapfe wotild be produced by thofe of Batavia,- 
tvhere the exhalations are ftill more noxious. 
Befides, the fituation of Batavia is fo pernicious 

to Europeans, particularly during the firfl: year of 

, jj. 
their abode there, that out of everv hundred fol-' 

diers who arrive there from Europe, twenty- 
four generally die in the firft year, and thofe who 
become fomewhat accuftomed to the climate, 
fiiill remain in a languifliing ftate of health. 
Other Europeans who have all the conveniencies 
of life at their command, do not die in lb terri- 
fying a proportion : but from the fmall allowance 
tTiat was granted us as prifoners of war, we could 
not hope to be able to procure ourfelves any 
thing beyond the mere neceifaries of life. 

Citizen Piron and myfelf obtained permiffion 
to delay our departure for Batavia till the Dutch 
fleet was juft about to fail. Our companions in 
misfortune, Laigncl, Ventenat, and Willaumez, 
fet off for that place; and as foon as they arrived 
there they were fent to Fort Tangaran* more' 
than 7,500 toifcs dillant from the town. Riche 

Y 4 and 



336 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l / Q4 

and Legrand, inftead of procuring a paffage in 
the packet, which was immediately to fet fail, 
had been exiled to Fort Anke. However, about 
two months afterwards, they had the good for- 
tune to embark for Ifle de France, on board of 
a vefTel in which fome prifoners taken from our 
privateers were conveyed to that place. 

Dauribeau, not fatisfied with having taken 
away my coUecElions, requefled of the Governor 
of Samarang, that the manufcript which con- 
tained the obfervations I had made during the 
voyage in fearch of Peroufe might likewife be 
taken from me. In vain I protefted againft this 
violation of the moft facred fpecies of property : 
Governor Overftraaten gave orders, on the 28th 
of July, that my efFeds, to which the feal had 
been applied a month before, fhould be fearchcd ; 
but fortunately my journal was not found. 

Dauribeau fhortly after his arrival at Sama- 
rang, for the purpofe of treating with the Go- 
vernor concerning the fale of the veflels, died 
there on the 22d of Auguft. 

As the time appointed or the failing of the 
Dutch fleet was at hand, Citizen Piron and my- 
felf fet out for Batavia on the 31 ft. On board 
of the veflel which conveyed us thither were feve- 
ral Javanefe, one of whom was in irons. His 
unfortunate wife fat befide him, having volun- 
tarily 



May.] of la perouse. 337 

tarily chofcn to follow him in his banifliment. 
We were penetrated with compaffion, when wc 
heard from the mouth of this unhappy man the 
occafion of his ruin. His name, he told us, was 
Piromongolo ; he was of the village of Calibon- 
gou, in the dependency of the Government of Sa- 
marang. He had paid 350 rix dollars to become 
a freeman of that place, but was fupplanted by 
another perfon, who offered a ftill larger fum for 
the fame privilege; and thofe who had received 
his money, inftead of returning it to him, thought 
iit to put him out of their way by banifhing him to 
Ceylon, where he was to be in the fame confine- 
ment with many others of the inhabitants of the 
Moluccas, who are facrificed by the Dutch to 
their revengeful difpofition, or pretended politi- 
cal interefls. Amongft the injuries that had been 
heaped upon him, he had been accufed, he faid, 
of being a Ibrccrer. Though he aflured us, with 
a great deal of fimplicity, that if he was one, he 
had never known any thing about it ; but at any 
rate he was fure that thofe who had robbed him 
of his three hundred and fifty dollars, were a 
much more dangerous kind of ibrcerers than he. 
The falary which the different Governors of 
the Ifland of Java receive from the Dutch Com- 
pany very moderate ; but then the abuies arc 
connived at, which refult from the very ample 

indemni- 



iS8 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l794. 

indemnification, which the greater part make 
themfelves, by raiding contributions upon the na- 
tives to a much greater amount than what they 
have to deliver into the magazines of the Com- 
pany, the furplus of which they appropriate to 
their own profit. 

The Chinefe are almoft the only perfons em- 
ployed here in the cultivation of fugar. They 
fcarcely make any other than fugar-candy, which 
they are not allowed to fell, except to the Gover- 
nor, whopurchafes it on the Company's account; 
but frequently he compels thefe unfortunate Chi- 
nefe to fell it him at half the price which he 
makes the Company pay for it, though even they 
buy it at a comparatively low rate. 

The contributions w^hich the Governors re- 
ceive in fpecie, are likewife a great fource of profit 
to them, as they keep this money in their own 
hands, and pay the amount to the Company in 
paper. During my flay in Java, their emolu- 
ments in this way amounted to twenty per cent. 

The nomination of the natives to different of- 
fices, is likewife a fource from whence the Go- 
vernors and Refidents derive great profits. ^ 

On the 2d of September we anchored in the 
roadflead of Batavia. 

4th. After we had remanied two days on board, 
the Commandant of the roadflead condudled us 

on 



May.] of la perouse. 339 

on fliore, and we were immediately conveyed to 
Fort Anke, diftant not more than about 2,500 
toifes from the town. The fame chamber was 
allotted us, which our companions in misfortune, 
Riche and Legrand, had formerly occupied. 

We were furrounded on ail fides by marfhes, 
which render this fituation very unhealthy : it is, 
however, much lefs fo than that of the town, 
where, at low water, the black mud collected in 
a great number of canals, is expofed to the heat 
of the fun, and exhales the moll peflilential ef- 
fluvia. The marllies of Anke, on the contrary, 
were covered with a variety of plants, fo clofe to 
each other, that they prefented the appearance of 
fine meadows in fall vegetation. A great num- 
ber of diiferent kinds of gralTes, rufhes, nelumbo, 
&c. grew forth from the bottom of the ftagnant 
water, and the interftices between thefe plants 
were covered with large quantities ot the pt'ijia 
Jlrattotes, which, floating on the furface of the 
water by means of the fmall air-bladders, with 
which its leaves are provided at their bafes, ab- 
forb a great quantity of the noxious vapours as 
fafl: as they are exhaled from the mud, and change 
them, with the aid of the folar rays, as vvc know, 
into refpirable air. ill is tranfmutation is atfecTted 
by the pt'tjia more than by any other plant ; for 
it is known by experiment to be fo powerful a 

preventive 



340 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l79^' 

preventive of the decompofition of ftagnant v^a- 
ter, that if filhes b*e put into a fmall quantity 
of water, in w^hich they v^^ould otherwife perifh 
in the courfe of a few days they may be prefer ved 
alive for a long time, by covering its furface with 
thefe fmgular plants, every one of which occu- 
pies a fpace of about nine fquare inches. 

Thefe raarflies are haunted by the enormous 
ferpent known by the name of boa cotiftriclor. 
One of thefe fnakes came regularly every five or 
fix days, and ftole one of the fowls from a hen- 
coop belonging to a publican in the neighbour- 
l¥Ood of Fort Anke, with whom we were allowed 
to take our meals. This publican was a very fe- 
vere mailer ; for, v/henever he mifl'ed one of his 
fowls he always taxed an old flave, who had the 
care of his hen-coop, with diflionefty ; and for 
every one that difappeared, he ordered fifty flrokes 
of a ratan to be infli(5led without mercy upon the 
unfortunate wretch ; but one day the thief having 
fwallowed a very large hen, found himfelf {o 
fluffed with his meal, that he could not get out 
of the coop by the hole through which he had 
entered ; and the ilave revenged himfelf for the 
chaftifement he had received by cutting the ani- 
mal in pieces. The fowl, v^hich was taken out 
of his ftomach, had been fwallowed down head- 
foremoft, and had as yet undergone no change in 

its 



May.] of la perouse. 341 

its fubftance. This ferpcnt was but of a middling 
fize, being only twelve feet in length ; but a few 
days afterwards the natives killed one at a fmall 
diftance from this place, which meafured forty 
feet. It appeared that this animal did not ufe to 
prey upon fowls ; for they found in his ftomach 
a kid that weighed thirty pounds. 

The river that runs at the foot of Fort Anke 
is frequented by alligators. One day I faw a very 
large one advance towards a company of boys 
who were fwimming in the river. He immedi- 
ately feized one of them and difappearcd under 
the water : neverthclefs, a few days after another 
company of boys came to bathe in the fame place. 

During the lafl: months of our flay at Anke, 
four officers of the French privateer Le Modefte 
were confined in the fame fortrefs, and alleviated 
the tedioufnefs of our captivity by their company. 
They had been made prifoners of war on board 
of a Dutch vefTel, fhortly after they had made 
prize of her. 

The Major of the place, who vlfited us yctj 
frequently, informed us of the death of Giradrin, 
purfer to the Recherche, who was difcovered to 
be a \voman, as we had fufpedled from the be- 
ginning of the voyage. An impulfe of curiofity 
feems to have been her principal motive for em- 
barking 



342 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l7Q4. 

barking in this expedition. She had left a very 
young child behind her in France. 

The corvette lua. Nathalie, having Citizen 
Riche on board, had been difpatched from Ille 
de France to Batavia in order to demand our 
veflels from the Regency ; but, after fhe had ar- 
rived in the roads, Ihe was detained for five 
months under the cannon of two Dutch fhips of 
war, and ail that fhe could obtain was to fail back 
with thofe perfons belonging to our expedition 
who were in confinement, and fome other French 
prifoners of war. 

At length, on the 29th of March 1 795, we 
fet fail for the Ifle de France. 
. It was high time for me to be releafed from 
my confinem.ent amongfi: the marflies of Fort 
Anke, as I had laboured already more than a 
month under a dyfentery, which was making a 
very rapid progrefs. But as foon as I was removed 
into a purer air, my malady diminifhed from day 
to day. 

On the 18th of May we arrived at Me de 
France, I made frequent excurfions among the 
mountains, where I obferved a great variety of 
natural productions. 

I had long been waiting for an opportunity of 
returning to my native country, when at length 

General 



May.] of la perouse. 343 

General Malartic difpatched the Minerva to 
France, under the command of Citizen Laignel, 
one of my companions in misfortune. I embarked 
in this veffel, which failed from Ifle de France on 
the 20th of November. • 

It is remarkable, that during a run of upwards 
of 600,000 toifes weft-north-weft, from 25° N. 
lat. and 31*^ W. long, we found the fea covered 
with a prodigious quantity oifuciis natwis, which 
indicate the exigence of fome very extenfive 
tanks upon which this fea-weed is produced. 
This is a fubjed; well worthy of the inveftigation 
of navigators. 

On the 12th of March 1796, we caft anchor 
at the Ifle of Bar, from whence I foon returned 
to Paris. 

Soon after I arrived in that city, I was inform- 
ed that my colledions of natural hiftory had 
been fent to England. The French Government 
immediately put in their claim for them, which, 
being fupported by Sir Jofeph Banks, Prefident 
of the Royal Society of London, with all the ex- 
ertions that were to have been expe<5ted from his 
known love for the fciences, I foon had the fa- 
tisfa^lion of finding myfelf again in poileiTion of 
the requifite materials, for making known to the 
world the natural produdlions which I had dif- 

covered 



344 VOYAGE IN SEARCH [l794. 

covered in the different countries we had viiited 
daring the courfe of our expedition. 

The bread-fruit plants which I left in the cuf- 
tody of the gardener Lahalc, were transported, 
with feveral others which he had cultivated, to 
Ifle de France ; from whence fome have been fent 
to Cayenne, and others to Paris, where they are 
depofited in the hot-houfes of the Botanical Gar- 
den. 



APPENDIX. 



APPENDIX. 



VOCABULARY 

OF THE 

LANGUAGE OF THE MALAYS. 



A. 



ACCOMPANY (to) 


- Touroutfama 


Accuftom (to) 


- BialTa 


Adieu, farewel 


- Tabe 


Adultery 


- Gendach 


jEfchinomenegrandiflora 


- Malafui 


Age - 


- Houmour 


Agreeable 


- Soucagnia 


Air, wind 


- Anging 


Aloes 


- Lida boaya 


Allum 


- Tauouafs 


Ananas 


- Ananas, nanas 


Animal, quadruped 


- Binatan 


Anchor 


- Sao, baffi 


Anona miiricata 


- Anona 


Appetite 


Lapar 


Apply (to) 


- Taro 


Approach (to) 


- Decat 


After 


- Commedian, diblacan 


Areca 


- Pinang 


Army 


- BarifTan 


Aromatic 


Vannni bahe 


Arrack 


- Zopi 


Arrange (to) 


- Ator • 


Arrive (to) 


- Datan, poulan 


Vol. U. 


a 



2 



APPENDIX. 



AfTaffin 

Attach (to) 

Attention (to pay) 

Any body 

Alfo 

Around 

Another 

Azederac (aielia) 

AlTuredly 

At 

Already 

At length 

Above 

Afterwards 

Attempt (to) 

Awake (to) 

Awakened (to be) 

Angry (to be) 

Ant (an) 

Adorn one's felf (to) 

Amongft 

Able (to be) 

Almoft 

Although 

Anfwer (to) 

Awake (to) 

Alone 

Ape (an) 

As foon as 

Always 

All 

Afterwards 



- Bounou oran. 

- Jcat 

- Dgiaga 

- Trada oran 

- Itou lagui, lagui 
Bound re 

Lain 

Foula mourgati 
Fafti, fongou 
Sam a 
Souda, abis 

- Lama lama 
Tingui, diyatas 
Commedent 

- Tchouba-tchouba 

- Kredgia bangon 
Sonda bangon 

- Mara, gueguen 

- Smouth 
Pake bagous 

- Sama fama 

- Bole 
Ampcr 

- Mefki 

- Megniaot 
Bangon 

- Candiri 
Mougniet 

- Kalo 

Sela manguia 

- Samougnia 

- Lacafs 



APPENDIX. 



B. 



Bee 

Bark (to) 

Buy (to) 

Bring (to) 

Brought to bed (to be) 

Beloved 

Bitter 

Bow 

Behind (from) 

Bathe (to) 

Before (from) 

Blind 

Before 

Bathe (to go to) 

Begone 

Broom (a) 

Bamboo 

Bamboo (very young fhoots 

of the) for pickling 
Banana 
Beard 
Below 
Bafella rubra 
Beat (to) 
Beak (bill) 
Betel 

Bilimbi (averrhoa) 
Blue 
Box 

Borafllis fiabellifoimis 
Brothel 
Buckles 



Taoun madou 

Gongonh 

Bli 

Kiary 

Branan, clouaranac 

Soudatchinta 

Pait 

Pana 

Di blacan 

Siram 

Di mouca 

Bouta 

Dolo 

Mandi, cloardiaet 

Sourby 

Sappou 

Pring, bambou 

Ribbon 

Piifang 

Coudek 

Dibaoua 

Gandula 

Pocol 

Molou 

Siri 

Blimbing 

Birou 

Peti 

Lontor 

Poporket 

Kandging 



a 2 



APPENDIX. 



Buckles (knee) 

Boil (to) 

Broth 

Bowl 

Buttons - 

Brave 

Bridle 

Brick 

Break (to) 

Brufh (a) 

Buffalo 

Burn -one's felf (to)' 

Brains 

Bat (a) 

Bell 

Baiket 

Body 

Blow (a) 

Believe (to) 

Begin (to) 

Bargain (a cheap) 

Bura, die (to) 

Breakfaft (to) 

Behind 

Beneath 

Before 

Back 

Borrow (to) 

Bev/itch (to) 

Building (to be in). 

Be (to) 

Brittle 

Brother 

Bet, lav a wager (to) 



Canibau 

- Bdidi 
^ Caldc 

Kegue 

- Kantging karn 

- "Biani, oran brani: 

- Kandali 
Batou Keddon 

- Pitchia, pikiat 

- Sicat, fica 
Coibau 
Bauar 

- Outac 
Bouroii-ticoulTe 

- Londgin 

- Kranguian 

- Badan 

- Tampelin 
Cokira, perkia'ia, 

- Molai 

- Moura 

- Mampoul 
Makan pagtii- 
Diblacan 
Dibaona 

Di mouca 
-~ Blackagrtia 

- Pegnieni 
Tauver 
Natchiam 

- Ada 

~ Lacas pitchia- 
Soudara. 

- Pefaro 



APPENDIX. 



Boy 

Bell (a little) 

Broil (to) 

Briftling 

Bacon 

Bed 

Book 

But - - 

Beggar 

Bite (to) 

Blow one's nofe (to) 

Born (to be) 

Bird's neft 

Black 

Bird 

Bufy (to be) 

Bone 

Bread fruit 

Bread fruit (wild) 

Bread 

Butterfly 

Bafket 

Buffoon 

Bet (to) 

Butterfly (a fpecies of) 

Bruife (to) 

Boat (Indian) 

Breaft (the) 

Blackguard (a) 

Bridge (a) 

Behave well (to) 

Bug 

Breathe (to) 

Break (to) 



- Boudgian 

-^ Loudgin kitkii 

- Panghan, bakar 

- Bagnia rambout 

- Gommock babi 

- Tambat tidor 
Boucou, quitape 

- Tape 

- Oran minta 

- Guigui 

- Bouan ignus 
Datandi donia 
Sarong bourou 

- Itan 

- Bourou 

- Fontouli 

- Toulan 

- Boa fuccou 

- Boa timbol 

- Roti 

Koupou, kopokopa 

- Tampat 
Caflan 

- Betaro 
Koupou malani 

- Toumbok 

- Prau 

- Dada 
Oran adiar 

- Djanbatan 

- Ada bai 

- Coutou tampat tidor 

- Napas 

- Pata 

^3 . 



APPENDIX. 



BelcTi (to) 


- 


Ato 


Beehive (a) - 


- 


Romataoun 


Bleed (to) 


- 


Sangara 


Blood 


- 


Dara 


Boar (a wild) 


- 


Tcheleng 


Bofom (the) 


- 


Soufou, tetc 


Blow (to) 


- 


Tihope 


Box (to) 


f 


Cambeling 


Beneath 


'" 


Baoua 


Barren 


- 


Trada patana 


Bark, for tanning 


- 


Cayou bounko 


By and by 


- 


Sabentar 


Bull 


- 


Lombou 


Betray (to) 


- 


Camblanghan 


Barter (to) - . 


- 


Toukar fama 


Blow (to) 


- 


Anguin 


Belly 


- 


Prot 


Bladder (the) 


- 


Tampat kinkin 




c. 


CoUea (to) 


- 


Pungot 


Call (to) 


- 


Panguil 


Clay 


- 


Lambac 


Certainly 


- 


Sacali 


Confefs (to) 


- 


Menauo 


Chatterer 


- 


Bagna tcherita 


Corn, wheat 


- 


Bras blanda, gandoum 


■Cable 


- 


Tali fao 


Chaife (a) 


- 


Creta fiafs 


CofFee - - 


~ 


Coffi 


Calamus aromaticus 


- 


Dringho 


Cinnamon '• 


■- 


Cayou manis 


Cannon 


- 


Marian 


Cardamum (the little) 


- 


Gardamoungo 



APPENDIX. 



"Carefs (to) 

Chariot (>) 

Cards, for playing 

Cafuarina 

Cinders, afhes 

Circle 

Chair !a.) -' 

Chalcas camuniing 

Candle, light (a) 

Change, exchange (to) 

Coal 

Chinefe 

Choofe (to) 

Coco 

Coition 

Cucumber 

Contrary (on the) 

Cord, rope 

Corypha umbraculifera 

Cotton 

Colour 

Cut 

Crooked 

Culhion 

Cover (a) 

Chalk 

Cry out (toj - . 

Cook (to) - , -r 

Copper - - 

Cynometra cauliflora 

Chagrin - =^- 

Cat 

Caftrate (to) 

Comprehend (to) - 



Gonb 

Greta toutoup 
Cartou 

Cayou famara 
Abou 
Bonder 
Croffi 
Kamouni 
Lilen 
Toucar 
Arenh 
Orankina 
Pili, tchioba 
Kalapa, klapa 
Tiouki 
Timon 
Lain 
Tali 
Saribou 
Benan 
Roupa 

Poton, tadgiani 
Bcnko 
Bantal 
Combar 
Kappor blanda 
Batreia 
MalTac 
Toinbaga 
Nam nam 
Saketati 

Koutchi£:n, toulTa 
Kabiri 

Tau, menart! 
a4 . ' 



8 



APPENDIX. 



Count, reckon (to) 

Conduft fto) 

Contrary wind 

Cover, enclofe (to) 

Crufh to pieces (to) 

Cup 

Church 

Catch cold (to) 

Carelefs 

Call for (to) 

Cunning 

Cold 

Cheefe 

Clove tree 

Clutches (fignifying hands] 

Cricket (a fpecies of) 
Climb (to) 

Coarfe 

Clock (a) 

Conflagration 

Cheek (a) 

Cowardice 

Chin 

Coin, value 2|d. 

Cloud (a) 

Comb (a) 

Comb one's head (to) 

Coward 

Carry (to) 

Chicken 

Crawl (to) 

Chafing difh 

Come back (to) ^ 

Cold (a) rheum 



- Iton 

- Baoua 

- Tchenela 
Toutoup 

- Toumbo 

- Manco 

- Gredgia 

- Pilic 

- Sarfar, guila 

- Sourou panguil 

- Pinter 

- Dinguin, dignin 

- Kediou 

- Kenke 
Tangan 

- Yankrek 

- Naik 

- Kaflar 

- Lontchin 

- Beflar api 

- Pipi 
Leffou 

~ Djiangot 

- Koupan pera, ouan barou 

- Mega 

- CiO'er 

- Ciflfer rambout 

- Trada brani 

- Picol 

- Ayammouda 

- Dgialan caia oular 

- Kren 

- Balai, combali datan 

- Patoc 



APPENDIX. 



9 



Cuttle f](h 

Compadl 

Century 

Cup 

Corkfcrew 

Cork (to draw a) 

Cloth 

Cough (to) 

Cough (a) 

Cow (a) 

Come (to) 



Drink (to) 

Dirt 

Dear, high priced 

Dog 

Dance (to) 

Difccver (to) 

Defend 'to) 

Defcend (to) 

Debt 

Diamond 

Diarrhea 

Difficult 

Diligent 

Dine (to) 

Dolichos luberofus 

Domeftic 

Demand (to) 

Debauch (to) 

Dried up 

Do (to) 

Do that 



- lean pougniabatou 

- Jcat crafs 

- Serafus ta un 

- Tchanger 
Poutar, ouler 

- Tchiabou 

- Cagui 

- Batou 

- Batou 

- Sampi paranpouan 

- Datan, mari, poulan 

D. 

- Minum 

- Lumpor, cotor 

- Mahal 
Andgin 

- Tandac 

- Bouca 
La ran 

- Touron 

- Outan 
Inten 

Saket bouanaer 
SoulTa 

- Naguin 

- Comp, makan ftin^a art 
Bongouan 

Oupas, boudac 

- Minta, tagni§ 

- Ambel praoen loller 

- , Krain, kring 

- Kredgta 

- Kredgia itou 



10 



APPENDIX. 



Ditch (a) 


- 


Eentin 


Drop ^a) 


- 


Teres 


Drefs (to) 


- 


Packian, pake 


Drefs 


- 


Packian 


Difhoneft 


- 


leng tracafli ormat 


Damp 


- 


BalTa 


Drunk 


- 


Mabou 


Day 




All, paguiara 


Daylight (it is) 


- 


Souda fiam 


Day (every) 


- 


Sari ari 


Dull 


- 


Brat 


Death 


- 


Mati 


Die (to) 


- 


Mati 


Dumb 


- 


Tra biffa cata 


Deny (to) 


- 


Trada menauo 


Dare (to) 


- 


Brani 


Depart (to) 


- 


Pigui 


Depart 


- 


Souibay 


Dream (to) 


- 


Mnimpi 


Dollar (a) 


- 


Real compani 


Dew- 


- 


Oumboung 


Dry ' - 


- 


Souda cring 


Dry (to) 


- 


Cring 


Dream 


- 


Menimbi 


Deaf 


- 


Oran touli 


Darknefs 


- 


Glap, glap 


Deceive (to) 


- 


Kamblau 


Drefs (to) 


E 


Pake 


Expert 


- 


Biffa 


Elfewhcre 


- 


Lain, di lain tampat 


Eafily, with eafe 


- 


Ganpan 


Engaged with (to be) : 


. - 


Oudgiou 



APPENDIX. 



11 



Enough 


- 


Souda 


Ear- picker 


- 


Gorep copeng 


Eb'^ny 


- 


ayouaram 


Equal 




Sama-fama 


Elephant 


- 


Gadia 


Etnperor 




Sulfunan 


Enemy 


- 


Mouffo 


Entry 


- 


MafToc 


Enter (to) 


- 


Mairocdi dalam 


Envciopc (to) 


- 


Bonkou 


Epidendum 


- 


Angrec 


Eaft 


- 


Veran 


Eternity 


- 


Porflaraagnia 


Examine (to) 


- 


Tagnia 


Excrement 


- 


TaV 


Excufe 


- 


Cafli ampon 


Efteera (to) 


- 


Eagnia tchinta 


Eafy 


- 


Trada folifla 


End 


- 


Abis 


Eat (to) 


- 


Makan 


Eye 


- 


Mata 


Egg 


- 


Talor 


Ear 


- 


Kopeng, koplne 


Eyelid 


- 


Ourat 


Ear-rings 


- 


Crabou 


Efcape (to) 


- 


Lari 


Evening 


- 


Sori 


Eyebrow 


- 


HaliiTe 


Execute (to) 


- 


Oucoum 


Earth 


- 


Tana 


Earth (the) 


- 


Interrodonia 


Empty 


- 


Coifou 


Empty water out of a boat 






(inftrument to) 


- 


Timba 


Eyes 


- 


Mata 



i-2 



APPENDIX. 



Fine (a) 

Friend 

Friend (female] 

Fathoni (a) 

Flefh 

Fight (to) 

Finger 

Flay (to) 

Frighten (to) 

Filled up 

Fly (to) 

Faggot 

Fault 

Falfe (it is) 

Falfehood 

Female, woman 

Feftival 

Fire 
Fever 

Figure 

Fifhing-line 

Flame 

Flower 

Fountain , 

Fool. 

Forehead 

Fruit 

Flour 

Flagellaria judica 

Flower (to) 

Frefti 

Flog (to) - 



F. 

• Denda 

Sobat 

Sobat paranpouan 

Sato deppa 

Daguin 

Bacalaye 

Gredgy, yari 

Clouar kbulet 

Caguet 

Penou 

Lari, ilan 

Bon koulian 
Sala 

Djol^fia 

Djoufta 

Paranpouan 

Ari beffar 

Api 

Deman 

Mouka 

Dgiolon 

Mniala 

Comban, bounga 

Summur 

Bodo, oran guila, guendan 

Alis 

Boua-boua , 

Debon 

Rotan outan 

Comban 

Dinguin 

Pocol 



APPENDIX. 



la 



Flee (to) 


- 


Lari, bourou 


Fufil 


- 


Pedel, fuapan 


Fat (fubft.) 


- 


Gommock 


Fat (adj.) 


- 


Gomraok 


Frog 


- 


Codoc 


Fortunate 


- 


Slamat, beronton 


Fifh-hook 


- 


Pantchien 


Formerly 


- 


Dolo 


Farthing (a) 


- 


■ Keppen 


Free 


- 


Merdica 


Far 


- 


Dgiau 


Fly (a) 


- 


Lalar 


Forget (to) 


- 


Loupa 


Fifli (to) 


_- 


Ambel ican 


Father 




Papa 


Fear 


- 


Caguet, tacot 


Foot 


- 


Kaki 


Flat 


- 


Samarata 


Full 


- 


Penan 


Fold a napkin (to) 


- 


Lipa ferbetta 


Feather (a) 


- 


Penant, boiilou, boulongouia 


Frying' pan 


-- 


Ouadjan 


Fifli 


- 


Ican 


Firft 




Lebi daulon 


Flea (a) 


- 


Coutou andgin 


Fetch (to) 


- 


Kredgia bait 


Fillfto) 


- 


Kredgia penou 


Field of rice (a) 


. - 


Sava 


Filthinefs 


- 


Cotor 


Foolifh 


- - 


Guila, bodo 


Follow (to) 


- 


Tchinda, tourout 


Fall (to) 


- 


Guiatou 


Flock (a) 


- 


Bagnia binatan. fama fama 


Find (to) - 


- 


Dapat 



14 



APPENDIX. 



Friday 


- - 


- 


Ari diemat 


Food 


_ 


- 


Djguin 


Face (the) 


- 


- 


Mouka 


Fly (to) 


- , 


- 


Minkiourri 






G. 


Grieve fto) 


- 


- 


Saqnetati 


Garlic 


- 


- 


Baouan pouti 


Go (to) 


- 




Dialan, pigui 


Good 


- 


- 


Bahe, tailloi), etiac 


Gourd (a) 


- 


- 


Labau p-'.ndang 


Goat 


- 


-_ 


Cambing 


God 


- 


- 


Touanala, toueran alle 


Give (to) 


- 


- 


CafTi ■ 


Gain (to) 


- 


- 


Onton 


Gay 


- 


- 


Enac ati 


Gallop (to) 


- 


- 


Dialan tell 


Guard (to mount) 


- 


Djaga 


Guard (tp) 


- 


- 


Simpan 


Generous 


- 


- 


Pa fa ran 


Gefture 


- 


- 


Tinkagnia 


Glutton 


- 


- 


Bagnia makan 


Goave 


- 


- 


Goryave 


Great 


- 


- 


BeflTar, tingui 


Gratis 


- 


- 


Trabole trima, perkioums 


Grimace 


- ' - ■ 


- 


Tinka 


Guide 


- 


- 


Toniou dialan 


Genteel 


- 


- 


Halus 


Gold lace 


- 


- 


Pafmin 


Green turf 


- 


- 


Ron m pot 


Gums (the) 


.- 


- 


Icanguigui 


Gipfum 


- 


- 


Taufou 


Gouramier 


(a fifh thus 






named ) 


- 


- 


lean gourami 



APPENDIX. 



15 



Growl (to) 


- 


Marat 


Grafs 


- 


Roumpot 


Garden 


- 


Kabon 


Greens 


- 


Sayor 


Grind (to) 


- 


Tumbok, toumbo 


Gall-nut 


- 


Madia cane 


Gold 


- 


Mafs 


Gate (a) 


*- 


Pintou 


Gunpowder 


- 


Obat pafTan 


Gather (to) - • 


- 


Ambel 


Gird (to) 


- 


Icatcras tali prot 


Grafshopper 


- 


Balang 


Green 


- 


Idgiau, ougou 


Glafs 


- 


Kermine 




H. 


Have (I) 


^ 


Ako ad a 


Hunchbacked 


- 


Pounco 


Heat 


- 


Panas 


Hot 


- 


, Panas 


Hunting (to go a) 




Pigui palFan 


Heat (to) 


- 


Maifac 


Horfe 


- 


Kouda 


Hair 


- 


Rambout 


Hat - 


- 


Top pi 


Flardwareman 


- 


Toucanclinton 


Heart 


- 


Yanton 


How much 


- 


Barapa 


How- 


- 


Saya 


Horn 


- 


Tandou 


Hog 


- 


Babi 


Hook (a) 


- 


Tiantolan 


Half 


- 


Stinga 


Hard 


- 


Cras 



i6 



APPENDIX, 



Hear (to) 


- 


Dingher 


Hell 


- 


Nourakka 


Hufband 


- 


Penanten laks 


Hope 


- 


Kira 


Hungry (to be) 


- 


Lappar 


Hole (a) 


- 


Potoia 


Hatchet (a) 


- 


Camba 


Hafli (to) 


- 


Kinkian 


Hate (to) 


- 


Benki, mara? / 


Harem 


- 


Seller 


High 




Tingui 


Helideres ifora 


- 


Boa radja 


Hernandia ovigera 


- 


Cayou radjs 


Hour's walk (an) 


- 


Sato djaum 


Hour (an) 


- 


Pocol 


Hibifcus tiliaceus 


- 


Ouarou 


Hiftory 


- 


Kirita 


Honed 


- 


Caffi ormat 


Honour 


- 


Ormat 


Howl (to) 


- 


Boubouni 


Here 


- 


Di fmi 


Hire a coach (to) 


- 


Sewan^creta 


He 


- 


Dia 


Hand 


- 


Tangan, gueare 


Houfe 


- 


Rouma 


Hammer (a) 


- 


Pocol befli 


Honey 


- 


Madou 


Handkerchief 


- 


Sapo tangan, linfo 


Hang (to) 


- 


Ganton 


HairdreiTer 


- 


Toucanciffer 


Heavy 


- 


Brat 


Hair 


- 


Boulou 


Hen (a) 


'- 


Ayam 


However 


- 


Moufti 



-i 



APPENDIX. 



17 



Horferadiih 


- 


Loba 


Health - - . 


- 


Slamat 


His 


- 


Pougnia 


Hold (to) 


- 


Pegandi tangan 


Head 


- 


Capala ^ 


Hole 


- 


Louka, loban 


Hole (to make a) 


- 


Kredgia loban 


Here 


- 


Ada 


Ifinglafs 


I 


Andiour 


Immediately 


- 


Secaran 


In, within 


-. 


Diadalm 


Itch (to) 


- 


Krechia, main main 


Inkftand 


- 


Tampat toulifs 


Ink - - • 


- 


Tinta 


Infant, male or female 


- 


Anak 


Intoxicate (to) 


- 


Mabou 


Inter (to) 


. 


Tanam 


Intirely 


- 


Bafti 


Iron 


- 


Beffi 


Itch (the) 


- 


Garo , 


Inhabit (to) 


- 


Tingal 


Inherit (to) 


- 


Depat poflaca 


Idea 


- 


Pekiran 


Ignorant 


- 


Bodock 


Ifland 


- 


Poulou 


Imitate (to) 


- 


Tourotan 


Immoveable 


- 


Trada goian 


Impatient 


- 


Tranata 


Impertinent 


- 


Brani 


Impodible 


- 


Traboule 


Impotent 


- 


Tra bole kredgia apapa 


Inconvenient 


- 


Soufifo ' \ 



l^ 



APPENDIX. 



Innmodeft 

Indigo 

Infamous 

Infeded 

Injury 

Innocent 

Inundation 

Inundate (to) 

Infers 

Infipid 

Inftrutl (to) 

Invent (to) 

Irritate (to) 

III 

Iron clothes, (to) 

If 

In cojifequence of 

Ivory 

Jealous 

Join (to) 

Joined together 

Jew 

Juft ^ - 

Jaw (the) 



Kifs (to) 
Kifs my a — c 
Key 

Know (to) 
Knife 
Kitchen 
Knees 
KFiock (to) 



- Trada malou 
>' Nila 

- Trada raalougna 

- Bouflfouc bagnia 

- Maki 

- Trada fala 

- Banguir 

- Banguir 

- Taoun, mahemahc 

- Tra enack 

- Adiar 

- Dapat 

- Kredgia mala 

- lahat 

- Streka 

- Kalo 

- Saya 

- Toulan gadia 

- Getrtbourouan 

- Kredgia fama fama 

- Diadi 

- Chemaos 

- Betol 

- Daguin guigui 

K. 

- Cadi tioum, tioum 

- Guilapantat 

- Kounki 

- Kenaille 

- Piflbu 

- Dapor 

- Loutou 

- Tendi fs 



APPENDIX. 



19 



King 


- Sultan, radja 


Kingdom 


- Rami 


Kicking 


- Seppa 


Know (to) 


- Larac 


Knit (to) 


- Mindgeail caufs 


Kill (to) 


- Touflbu 


i 


L. 


Lean on one's elbow (to) 


- Soungouan 


Love (to) 


- T chinta, fouca 


Love 


- Tchinta 


Lean, reft upon (to) 


- Taro tyaga 


Leafe (a) 


- Bea 


Leafe (to let on) 


- Malas, anghop 


Lame 


- Pintchan 


Lime 


- Kappor 


Limeftone 


- Batou kapper 


Lemon 


- Dierro aflam 


Lie down (to) 


- Tidoran 


Like that 


- Beguitou, beguini 


Lightning 


- Biglap 


Light (to) - . 


- Tran 


Leaf (a) 


- Daun, blaye 


Liver (the) 


- Ati 


Left (the) 


- Kiri 


Leg . .. 


- Coeto 


Labour (to) 


- Patchiol 


Lake 


- Aer beflar 


Leave (to) 


- Lapafs 


Large 


- Lebar 


Light 


- Trada brat 


Letter (a) 


- Sourat 


Lip 


- Biber 




b2 



20 



APPENDIX. 



Lizard 

Libertine 

Limonia trifoliata 

Linen 

Lion 

Long 

Light 

Lick (to) 

Let for hire (to) 

Lye (to tell a) 

Looking-glafs 

Lefs 

Lofe ^to) 

Lofe at play (to) 

Little 

Little (a) 

Lead 

Lay eggs (to) 

Loufe (a) 

Lungs (the) 

Lend (to) 

Line (a) 

Liquorice 

Loins (the) 

Lift up (to) 

Laugh (to) 

Leech (a) 

Learned 

Leap (to) 

Lord 

Like 

Lock (a) 

Lockfmith 



- Kikia 

- Brani fama paran pouan 

- Mekantkil ou dierre kilkil 

- Baran 

- Singo ' 

- Paguian 

- Tran, fiam 

- Quilet 

- Tero 

- Djoufta 

- Katchia, kiarmine 

- Kouran 

- Ilan 

- Kala 

- Kitkil, penkek 
Sidiquet 

- Tima itaa 
Betalor 

- Coutou 

- Parou 

- Piundjoun, pignlan 

- lean pare 

- Cayou manis blanda 

- Blacan 
■- Ancat 

- Tetaoua 

- Lynta 

- Oran pinder 

- Bloundgiat, blumpat 

- Touan beffar 

- Sama roupa 

- Ma coundgy 

- Toucan coundgy 



APPENDIX. 



21 



Lukewarm 




- 


^ Sangat 


Life 


- 


- 


Idop 


Live (to) 


- 


- 


Idop 






M. 


Money 


• - 


- 


Ouan 


Magnificent 


- 


- 


Bagous 


Much 


- 


- 


Segala, bagnia-talalo 


Mouth 


- 


- 


Monlot, moulou 


Mallard (a) 


- 




Bebe 


Mufhroom 


- 


- 


Diamour 


Marry (to) 


- 


- 


Caven 


Muft (it) 


- 


- 


Mifti 


Man (a) 


- 


- 


Oran, ourang, lakilaki 


Mongrel Indi 


ian 


- 


Leplap 


Milk 


- 


- 


Aer rouffou 


Monday 


- 


- 


Ari finen 


Moon (the) 


- 


- 


Boulan 


Mace 


- 


- 


Combang pala 


Mafon (a) 


- 


- 


Toucan baton 


Madam 


- 


- 


Gnien, Gnognia 


Mifs 


- 


- 


Ana dara 


Mafter 


- 


- 


Ton an 


Malay 


- 


- 


Malayo tabale 


Male- 


- 


- 


Laki laki 


Ma ngou dan 


- 


- 


Mangouftan 


Merchant 


- 


- 


Orandjoual merdika 


Mix (to) 


- 


- 


Chiamper 


Member 


- 


- 


Badan 


Mercury, quickfilver 


- 


Aer pera 


Mother 


- 


- 


Mai, ma, mama 


Meflenger 


~ 


- 


Kirriman 


Meafure (to) 


• 


. 


Oukor 


Metal 


- 


- 


Tambaga 
b3 



22 



APPENDIX. 



Michelia champaca 

My 

Middle 

Miracle 

Mifery 

Manner 

Me - - 

Month 

Moment 

Monoculus polyphemus 

Mountain 

Mount (to) 

Mock (to) 

Morinda citrifolia 

Muftard 

Mufcle 

Mufic 

Meagre 

Misfortune 

Malicious 

Manage (to) 

Mark (a) 

Mattrefs (a) 

Marrow 

Mould 

Mortar for rice (a wooden) 

Mulatto 

Mat (a) 

Marriage 

Marriageable 

More 

Maidenhead 

Mend (to) 

Move (to) 



- Cananghan 

- Pougnia 

- Ditingan 

- Eran 

- Kaflieu 

- Patout 

- Goa, ako, beta 

- Boulan 

- Sabantar 

- Mimi 

- Gounon 

- Naik 

- Kredgia malo 

- Bancoudon 

- Savi 

- Ourat 

- Mainan 

- Kourous 

- Kielaka 

- Trada bahe 

- Pegan 

- Tan da 

- Combefs 

- Gommok pougnia toulain 

- BoufTouc 

- Loumpan 

- Groubiak 

- Ticker 

- Kaven 

- Souda biraie 

- Lebi 

- Praocn 

- Kredgia betol 

- Goi'an 



- 


APPENDIX. i 


Midwife 


- 


Paranpouan brana 


Moufe (a) 


- 


Ticoufle peti 


Milk (to) 


- 


Deppo 


Miftaken (to be) 


- 


Souda fala, trada betol 




N. 


Needle 


- 


Dgiarum 


Nofegay 


- 


Comban 


Noife 


- 


Glouadagan 


Neck 


- 


Leber 


Never 


- 


Pougnia homour 


Now 


- 


Secaran 


Notwithftanding 


- 


Mafqui 


Net (a) 


* 


Sombou 


Noon 


- 


Doua plas pocol, ftinga ari 


Nails 


- 


Pakou 


Nutmeg, long 


- 


Pala laki laki 


r>^mrv%t^n 




Pala laHrnn 


Nauclea orientalis 


. 


Bancal 


Neceflfary (it is) 


- 


Mifki kredgia 


(it is not) 


- 


TraoufiTa 


Negligent 


- 


Malafs 


Neglea (to) 


- 


Loupa 


Nofe 


- 


I don 


Niecd 


- 


Tchiou tchiou 


Name (to) 


- 


Panguil, pouranama 


Not 


- 


Boucan, trada tida 


Nourifti (to) 


- 


Cafli makan 


News 


- 


Kerita 


Nut 


- 


Btgui 


Naked 


- 


Tlangnian 


Ki ight 


- 


Malam 


Navigate (to) 


- 


Blayer 


Nail (of the fingers) 


- 


Koukou 



23 



b4 



24 



APPENDIX. 



Near this place 

Nine-pins 

Nothing 

North 

Neighbouring 



Ox (an) 

One-eyed 

Of, of the 

Once 

Oil 

Oyfter 

Odd (not even) 

Obey (to) 

Obliged (much) 

Obfcure 

Obtain 

Odor 

Officer 

Offer (to) 

Onion 

Opium 

Orange 

Ordinary 

Order (to) 

Ornament 

Or 

Open (to) 

Oxalis 

Overthrow (to) 

Only 

Often 

Old man 



- Dec at fmi 

- Ana kegue 

- Trada 

- Nalor 

- Decat 

O. 

- Sampi 

- Bouta fato 

- Di, deri 

- Sakali 

- Miniac 

- Tiram 

- Benko 

- Dinguer 

- Tremacafll 

- Kouran tran 

- Dapat 

" V Vangni, bau 

- Alferus 

- Mao cafli 

- Baouan, baouan mera 
-, Amphion, madat 

- Djerro manis, guiroh 

- Slamagna 

- Souro 
-, Beda 

- Ke , 

- Bouca 

- Galing galing tana 

- Thutan 

- Kiouma 

- Bagni kali 

- Oran toua 



APPENDIX. 



!2S 



Old Woman 

Old 

Oppofite 



Paffion (to be in a) 

Pickles 

Preferve (to) 

Prawn 

Parte 

Poifon (to) 

Pregnant woman 

Pierce (to) 

Pin (a) 

Pewter 

Paint 

Pofteriors (the) 

Pride 

Pomegranate 

Play 

Play (to) 

at cards 

Place (a) 
Paps 

Phyfician 
Phyfic 
Put (to) 
' Piece (a) 
Plane (a) a joiner's tool 
Proud 
Pair (a) 
Pair of fhoes 
Peace 
Pale, wan 



- Meme toua 

- Toua 

- Dimouka, decat 

P. 

- Mara 

- Manifang 

- Simpan 

- Oudan di laot 
Kantging 

- Radgiun 

- Bonting 

- Tindifs 

- Fenitti 

- Tima 

- Borrei 

- Pantat 

- Pfarati 

- Delima 

- Meinan 

- Mim, main 

- Main carton 

- Tampat 
Soufou 

- Toucanobat, miflris baflar 

- Oba-t 

- Terro, taro 

- Saparo 

- Konting lelen 

- Beffarun 

- PafTan 

- Sato palTan fapadou 

- Abis pram 

- Poutchiac 



25 



APPENDIX. 



Peacock 

Pardon 

Part (fome) 

Partake (toj 

Pace 

Pafs (to) 

Paved with brick 

Poor 

Pay (to) 

Peafant - ■ 

Pierce (to) 

Pearl 

Permiffion 

Perroquet 
Perfuade (to) 

People 

Perhaps 

Piaftre 

Pigeon 

Pimento 

Pimento and onions (a mix- 
ture of) 

Pinch (to) 

Pipe (for fmoking) 

Plain (a) 

Pleafe (to) 

Pleafure 

Plank 

Plant (a) - 

Plunge (to) 

Poignard 

Poinciania pulcherima 

Pepper 

Poner (a) 



Boorou merac 

Ampon 

Di mana, mana 

Bagui-bagui 

Petcha 

Guiabran, piko 

Batou bin 

Mefquin 

Baiar 

Oran di gounori 

Kredgia lobau 

Moudiara 

Amet 

Lori 

Befankal 

Bagnlaoran 

Brancali 

Real bato« 

Bourou dara 

Tchiabe 

Sambai 

Tchoubet 

Kioupa 

Lappan 

Souca 

Souca ati 

Pa pan 

Taneraan 

Sloroup 

Crifs 

Bougnia merac 

Merikia lada 

Bator 



APPENDIX. 



27 



PoflTefs (to) 
Poffible 
Pot (a) 
Pufli (to) 
Preach (to) 
Precious 
Predia (to) 
Prefer (to) 
Prince 
Profound 
Promife (to) 
Prudent 
Powerful 
PuniOi (to) 
Purgative 

Pure 

Phyfic (to take) 
Paint (to) 
Pare (to) 
Petrolium 
Peftle (a) 

11 fed for rice 

Pickaxe (a) 

Prick (to) 

Porcupine 

Port (a) 

Pulfe (the) 

Purflain 

Putrid 

Proper 

Pufh back (to) 

Path 

Piaure (a) 



Pougnia 

Brancali 

Coali 

Tola 

Mantcho 

Bagnia rega 

Soulap 

Candati 

Pneran 

Dalam 

Dgingi 

Oran diam 

Bai diam 

Tchelaka 

Obat clouar, obat cardgia 

perfi prot 
Nana 

Minum obat bouan aer 
Tchet 
Koupas 
Miniac taua 
Ana, ana toumbok 
Ana loumpan 
Brodjol 

Touflb, paco paco 
Landap 
Moara 
Gurat 
Guelang 

Bouffouc • 

Perfi 
Mundor 
Dialemkitkil 
Gambar 



28 



APPENDIX. 



Potatoes 
Pour (to) 



- Kanilaan 

- Taro 



Quickly 
Quarter (a) 
Quarrel (a) 
Quit (to) 
Queen 
Quick 



Ring (a) 
Road, way 
Rafcal 
Run (to) 
Right 

Right-hand 
Rcleafe (to) 
Rely on (to) 
Rogue 
Rub (to) 
Rude 

Relax (to) 
Rife (to) 
Road (lo) ' 
Rather 
Ripe 

Relative (a) 
Rain (to) 
Rain 

Requeft (to) 
Root (a) 
Relate (to) 



Lacafs 

Prapat 

Stori 

Tra tingal 

Ratou 

Lacafs 



R. 



Tchintchin, tchinkien 

Dialan 

Bank fat 

Lari 

Betol 

Kanan 

Kredgia bcffar 

Pfetcha'ia 

Oran menkiotiri 

Goffo 

KalTar 

Lapafs 

Bangon 

Bou 

Lebi babe 

Matan 

Sanna 

Oudgian 

Oudgian 

Minta 

Acar 

Dongnie 



APPENDIX. 



29 



Rare 
Rat 

• — (muflc) 
Receive (to) 
Relate (to) 
Refufe (to) 
Regard (to) 
Reign (to) 
Rejoice (to) 
Religion 
Remedy 
Repair (to) 
Regret Qo) 
Repent (to) 
Reft (to) 
Reproach (to) 
Refift (to) 
Refpea (to) 
Recolledt (to) 
Remainder 
Remain (to) 
Retard (to) 
Retain (to) 
Refound (to) 
Return (to) 
Refpea 
Rhinoceros 
Rhubarb 
Rich 

Ridiculous 
River (a) 
Rice (drelTed) 
Rice (in ftraw) 
Rice (the grain) 



larang 

- TicoufTe 
SI oil rout 

- Dapat 

- Taou darilouar 

- Tra maanna 
Liat, tengoa 

- Printa 

- Guiran 

- AflTal 

- Obat 

- Kredgia betol 

- Sa'ian 

- Geton 
,,- Tidoran 

- Core 

- Lavan 

- OriTiat 

- Eignet 

- Lt. bignan 

- Tingal, nanti 

- Nanti 

- Pegan 

- Boubouni 

- Bleca 

- Slaraat 

- Badoc 

- Calamba 
Kaia 

- Eni bole tetaoua 

- Aer kali, kali 

- Nafi 

- Padi 

- Brafs 



m 



APPENDIX. 



Rock 

Round 
Rofe (a) 

Rotang (the fruit of the ca- 
lamus) 
Roaft (to) 
Red 

blood 

Redden (to) 

Rupee - 

Route - 

Ribband 

Ruby (a) 

Rivulet -^ 

Row (to) 

Rancid 

Rafp (a) 

Rafp (to) 

Reftore (to) 

Repaft (a) 

Rofin 

Refpea (to) 

Refemble(to) 

Rofe-tree (a) 

Ruft 

Roll (to) 

Refide (to) 

Remember (to) 

Rafh 

Roof 

Rod (iron) 



Sliorten (to). 



Batou beflkr 
Bonder 
. Combang maou^r 

Boa falac 

■ Goring, backar 

. Mera 

. Treva toua 

- Kredgia mera 
. Roupia 

- Dialun 

- Fita 

- Mcera 

. Kali kitkil 

- Daion 

- Cras 

- Proudan 

- Parot 

- Caffi combali 

- Makan 

- Damar 

- Ormat 

- Sama roupa 

- Pohon maouer 

- Cotor beffi 

- Goulon 
. Tengai 

- Ingat 

- Brani 

- Roma tingui 
-^ Sica 

S. 

- Kredgia prendec 



APPENDIX, 



31 



Sour 


- 


Podes , 


Sharp, morofe 


- 


Aflam 


Soul 


- 


Dgiva 


Spider 


- 


Laoua-laoua 


Silver 


- 


Pera 


Sit down (to) 


- 


Doudou 


Swallow (to) 


- 


Talan 


Seize, fnatch (to) 


- 


Tchabout 


Sweep (to) 


- 


Sappou 


Ship (a) 


- 


Prau 


Stick (a) 


- 


Rotan, touca 


Stammer (to) 


- 


Kago 


Soon 


* 


Chanbentar, bloum 


Shut (to) 


- 


Toutoup 


Shine, glitter (to) 


- 


Tran 


Sheep 


- 


Domba 


Stag(aj - , 


- 


RouiTa 


Song (a) 


- 


Mingnlagni 


Sing (to) 


- 


Migriiagni 


Seek (to) 


- 


Kiari 


Scar 


- 


Louca 


Shirt 


■ - 


Kmedia 


Sky 


- 


Laoughit 


Sciflars 


- 


Gounting 


Spit (to) 


- 


Botian louda, louda 


Spitting-bafm 


> 


Tampat louda 


Shell (a) 


- 


Kran, bia 


Shoemaker 


- 


Toucan fpadou 


Short 


- 


Pendec 


Sew (to) 


- 


Myndgeait 


Spoon 


- 


Sendock 


Since 


- 


Sila magna 


Since yefterday 


- 


Dari kalamaren 


Sunday 


- 


Ari mingo 



,32 



APPENDIX. 



Say (to) 


- 


Bilin, kata, dekata 


Sleep (to) 


- 


Tidor 


Softly 


- 


Palan palan 


Sweet 


-- 


Manis 


Scale 


- 


Tiram 


Squirrel (flying) fciurus fagitta 


Velio 


She 


- 


Coe 


Scratch (to) 


- 


Garo 


Span (a) 


- 


Qiiilan 


Send (to) - \ 


- 


Tirem, kirin 


Shoulder 


. 


Ponda 


Sword 


- 


Pedan 


Shilling (Dutch) 


- 


Satali 


Slave 


- 


Lafcar 


Sort, kind 


- 


Roupa 


Sneeze (to) 


- 


Quain 


Spark (a) 


- 


Mniala 


SilkftufF" - 


- 


-Kainfoutra 


Star (a) 


- 


Bindan, bintam 


Strangle (to) 


- 


Ganton 


Study (to) -, 


'- 


Adiar 


Stirrups 


- 


Songo veddi 


Stra'it, narrow 


- 


Tefak 


Split (to) 


- 


Poton 


Slender 


- 


Alos 


Stroke (to) as one would a 


cat 


Poutre koutchien 


Strong 


- 


Koat, eras 


Smoke . 


- 


Acep 


Slip (to) 


- 


Leitchin 


Skilful 


- 


Biflbu 


Swallow (a) 


. 


Bourou fasapi 


Shame 


- 


Malou 


Swear (to) 


- 


Sounopan 


Spear (a) 


- 


Tomba 
J 



APPENDIX. 



32 



Slowly 


- 


'- 


Plan plan 


Sick 


- 




Saket 


Stake (to) 


- 


- 


Paha 


Sailor 


- 


■- 


Golo golo 


Same (the) 


- 


- 


Itou djouga 


Spare (to) 


-• 


- 


Simpan 


Sea 


-■' 


^ - 


Laot 


Snotty 


-' 


- 


Ignus 


Soft 


- 


- 


Lembec 


Sheep 


- 


- 


Kambing blanda 


Swim (to) 


- 


- 


Brenan, tourou 


Shipwreck 




■ - 


Pitchia kappal 


Smell 


- 


- 


Baugnia 


Storm 


. 


- 


Omba 


Shade 


- • 


- 


Baiam fombar 


Sorrel 


- 


. 


Souri 


Slothful 


» 


- 


Malafs 


Speak (to) 


- 


- 


Cata, bilan 


Skin 


- 


- 


Coulet 


Shovel (a) 


- 


- 


Patiol 


Stone (a) 


- 


- 


Batou gounon 


Several 


- 


•- 


Bagnian 


Smooth 


- 


- 


Litchen 


Sermon (a) 


- 


- 


Santri 


Slink (to) 


- ■ 


-' 


Bouffuc, baflin 


Since 


- 


- 


Kalo 


Some 


- 


- 


Apapa 


Sometimes 


- 


. 


Barankali 


Somebody 


- 


- 


Oran 


Shave (to) 


- 


- 


Tchioucour, atchia 


Shut up (to) 


■ - 


- 


Toutoup 


Shark (a) 


- 


' 


lean, kiou-kiou 


Succeed (to) 


- 


- 


Bole kredgia 


ea-fliorc (the) 


- 


c 


Pinguer laot 



.34 



APPENDIX. 



Scurf - 


- 


Coring 


Steep 


- 


Bagous eras 


Snore (to) 


- 


Mongoro 


Street 


" 


Guiabau 


Sand 




PafTcr, pafsir 


Sjbre -r 


- 


Spadel, pedang 


Sack 




Caroun 


Saltpetre 


- 


Garam blanda 


Salute you (I) 


- 


Tabea, tabe 


Salute (to) ' 


- 


Tabe 


Saturday 


• - 


Ari feptou 


Sandal wood 


- 


Tchindana 


Sattin 


- 


Kain fatiin 


Sauce 


- 


Koa 


Savory 


- 


Enac 


Savage 


- 


Outan 


Scorpion 


- 


Claban 


Sculptor 


- 


Toucan tcheit 


Sebeftena (cordia) 


- 


Daun candal 


Second » - 


- 


Aligna 


Secret 


- 


Diam 


Salt - - 


- 


Garam 


Sow (to) 


- 


Tanam 


Senfible 


r 


Bagnia rpugui 


Sepulchre 


.- 


Cobouran 


Serious 


- 


Alem 


Snake 


- 


Oular 


Serpent (boa conftri6lor) 


- 


Oularfaouan 


Signalize (to) 


- 


Tandagna 


Sign (to) . 


"- 


Toulifs namamo 


Silence 


- 


Diam fadja 


Sincere 


- 


Tradjoufta 


Salt (to) 


- 


Garam 


Spittle 


- 


Louda 



APPENDIX. 



35* 



Shoe (an old) 


- Qiienela 




Savour, tafte , - 


- Enac 




Soap 


- Sabon 




Saw (a) 


- Gradgic, gregadgi 




Saw wood (to) 


Gradgic cayou 




Saddle (a) 


- Ababa 




(to) 


- Ababa kouda 




Smell (to) 


- Vangui 




Squeeze (to) 


- Pegan bahe bahe 




Syrup 


- Tetefs 




Sober 


- Oran pendiam 




Social 


- Souca fobat 




Sifter 


- Soudarenia, foud 




Silk 


- Soutra 




Soldier 


- Saragny 




Sun 


- Man tare 




Solid 


- Cras 




Solitary 


- Souca candiri 




Sleep 


- Enac tidor 




Slumber (to) r. 


- Tidor 




Sound 


»- Baboni 




Sulphur 


- Beleran 




Shoe 


- Spadou, gulapaou 




Sup (to) 


- Makan fori 




Sigh (to) 


- Tari napafs 




Source 


- Pandjouran 




Sphinx 


Koupou fori 




Skeleton of a man 


- Pougnia toulan oran m 


ate 


Statue 


- Deos 




Stupid 


- Oran bodo 




Suddenly 


- Secaram 




Subfift (to) 


- Tahan 




Subtle 


- Alos 




Succulem 


- Enac 
C 2 





35 



APPENDIX. 



Suck (to) 
Sugar-cane 
Sugar (palm) 

white 

Sugar-candy 

Sweet 

South 

Sweat (to) 

Sweat 

Soot 

Suet 

Sultan 

Superb 

Supplicate (to) 

Suppurate (to) 

Sure 

Surely 

Surprifing 

Sufpedled 

Sorcerer 

Set oiF (to) 

Solder (to) 

Sweet fcent 

Silent -, 

Silent (to be) 

Slow 

Stain (to) 

Suck (to) 

Shear (to) 

Sharjp 

Sorrowful ^ 

Sow (a) 

Sell (to) 

Sale 

See fome thing (to) 



Tioup 

Toubou 

Goula itan 

Goula paflir; 

Goula batou 

Raffagnia manis 

Kidol 

Cringat 

Criegnote 

Affap 

Gommok cambing 

Suldan 

Bagnia, bagous 

Mindanbon 

Lucat talalo cotor 

Souda pafti 

Songou 

Talalo Iran 

Trada fobat, blum can alam 

Bankfat, pagnoulo 

Calouar, clouar 

Patri 

Crafvangni 

Tida tcherita 

Pandiam 

Talalo lama 

Tcheit 

Minum tete, miflbp 

Konting rambout 

Talalo tadgiam ' 

Oran foulTa 

Babi paranpouan 

Djoual 

Djoual 

Liat apapa 



APPENDIX, 



»7 



Tree 

To-day 

This, that, 

Tickle (to) 

Thing, any thing 

Toad 

Thigh 

Tub 

To-morrow 

■— (the day after) 

Tooth 

Therefore 

Together 

Thorn 

Twice 

Tun (a) 

Tremble (to) 

Taint (to) 

Tafte 

Tafte for (to have a) 

Throw (to) 

Twins 

Till . 

to-morrow 

Tongue 

Tear (a) 

Tired 

Tire (to) - - 

Tie (to) 

Trunk, box 

Tuefday 

Threaten (to) 

Thin 



T. 

- Pohon 

- Arreini 

- Itou 

- Gil 

- Apapa 

- Codoc 

- Paha 

- Bale 

- Belfo 

- LoufTa 

- Guigui 

- Commeden 

- Sama fama 

- Douri 

- Doua kali 

- Gontor 

- Kaguet 

- Bouflbuc 

- Rafla 

- RafTagnia 

- Lempar 

- Anac combar 

- Sampe 

- Sampe beffo 

- Lida 

- Nanguic 

- Leflbu 

- Leflbu 

- Icat 

- Peti 

- ArL flafla 

- Kredgia tacot 

- L itch in 

^3 



38 



APPENDIX. 



Take away [to) 

Throughout 

Think (to) 

Thumb 

Take (to) 

Tail 

Thank (to) 

Tuck up (to) 

Turmerick 

Thirfly (to be) 

Tobacco 

Table 

Taylor 

Tamarinds 

Tanner (a) 

Tempeft 

Time 

Time (long) 

Tender 

Termes fatale 

Terror 

Tea 

Tiger 

Timid 

Thou, thee 

Tomb 

Thy 

Thunder (to) 

Thunder 

Torrent 

Total 

Touch (to) 

Torment 

Tarn (to) 



- Picoulbaoua 

- Di fana fini, kouli leng 
1 Piker 

Dgenpol 

- Ambel, pegan 

- Bountol, ekor 

- Trema cafli 

- Goulon, ancat 
- - 'SafFran 

- Ahofs 

- Tambaco 

- Meguia, media 

- Toucan mindgeait 

- Airam, boa a^ram 

- Toucan coulet 

- Omba beflar 
Sam pa 

- Lama 

- Laumaefs ^ 

- Soumouth poetri 

- Tacot 

- Daun the 

- Makian" 

- Trada bran 

- Ofle, koe, lou, dla 

- Coubouran 
Koe pougnia 

- Bekilap 

- Goundor 

- Erofs 

- Samougnia, Iton 

- Tolac 

- Cleyling bounder 



APPENDIX. 



3f) 



Turtle-dove 


- 


Pourcoutout 


Traffic (to) 


- 


Daganghen, djoual 


Tranquil 


- 


Diam leren 


Tranrcribe(to) 


- 


Toulis combaly 


Tranfparent 


- 


Katchia 


Tranfpire (to) 


- 


Aer cringat clouar 


Tranfport (to) 


- 


Kiari 


Tremble (to) 


- 


Guementar 


Trefpafs (to) 


- 


Souda mate 


Treafure 


- 


Tanan mafs 


Tribute 


- 


Bea 


Triumph (to) 


- 


Slamal depatonton 


Too much 


- 


Tulalo bagnia 


Too little 


- 


Talalo fidiquet 


Tumult 


- 


Gueguer 


Temples 


- 


Pilingam 


Terminate (to) 


- 


Abis 


Tortoife (a) 


■- 


Pignou, koura koura 


(river) 


- 


Voulous 


Tipple (to) 


- 


Slamat minum , 


Trot (to) 


- 


Dgiatou 


Tile (a) 


- 


Guenden, batou guenden 


Tube (a) 


- 


Becacas 


Town (a) 


- 


Cota, negri 


True 


U 


Betol 

r. ' 


Untie (to) 


- 


Lapafs 


Ungrateful 


• 


Trada trima 


Unjuft 


- 


Trada patout 


Ufelefs 


- 


Tra houUa 


Unfortunate ^ 


- 


Kielakakan 


Undoubtedly 


- 


Pafti 


Uniform 


- 


Sama roupa 



C4 



40 A] 


PPE 


NDIX. 


tJrine 


» 


Kinkin 


Ugly 


- 


Yatel 




V. 


Vanifh (to) 


_ 


latouflaii 


Villain (a) 


- 


Bankfat 


Very 


- 


Baghia, talalo 


Veffel, (hip 


- 


Capal 


VefTel, utenfil - 


- 


Tampat 


Vine 


- 


Pohonangor 


Village 


- 


Negri 


Vinegar 


- 


Thiouka 


Violet 


- 


Mera mouda 


Violin 


- 


Viola 


•Vifit (to pay a) 


• 


Liatoran 


Voice 


•>■ 


Sonara 


Volcanic ftone 


- 


Batou timbou 


Vomit (to) 


- 


Mouta 


Vomitive 


- 


Obatmouta 




w. 


Wait (to) 


- 


Nanti 


With 


- 


Sama 


Well (adverb) 


- 


Bahe, bay 


White 


- 


Pouti 


Wound (to) 


- 


ToufFo 


Wood 


- 


Cayou 


— - — , a kind of black 


vein- 


- 


ed, in great eftimation 




•with the Javanefe 


- 


Cayou pelei 


Wax 


- 


Irouan 


Without (from) 


• - 


Dilour 


Wifli (to) 


- 


Kepegne 


Water 


- 


Aer 



APPENDIX, 



41 



Write (to) 
Wife 
Window- 
Weak 
Whip (a) 
Wafp ' 
War 
Weak 
Wool 
Wadi (to) 
Who, which 
When _ - 

Want (to) 
Walk (to) 
Wicked 

Wicked thing (a) 
Waggifti 
Water melon 
Wednefday 
World (the) 
Word (a) 
Wet (to) 
Whifkers 
Whifpcr (in a) 
We 
Where 
Weft 

Workman 
Weigh (to) 
Weep (to) 
Why? 

Walk (to take a) 
Whore (a) 
When 



Toulifs 

Penanten 

Tzendela 

Trada koat 

Dgemetey ' 

Taoun 

Pram 

Trabrani, trabifTjt 

Kappas blanda 

Touki 

Sapa 

Kapan, kalo 

Sala 

Dialan, koulelen 

Yahat, mara 

BouITouc 

Nacal 

Pafteka 

Ari ribbon 

Donia, interredonia 

Percataan 

Kredgia bafla 

Cornis 

Bifibifi 

Kita 

Di mana, mana 

Coulon 

Toucan 

Kredgia brat 

Manangnis 

Manapa 

Pigui cldin 

Sondel 

Kapan^ kalo 



42. 



APPENDIX. 



What is it ? 


- 


Apa coraa 


Who 


- 


Sap a 


Who is there ? 


- 


Sapada 


What 


- 


Apa 


V/rinkle (a) 


- 


Kiffot 


Week 


- 


Sato dimingo 


Whiftle (to) 


- 


Ploit] 


Whilft 


- 


Kalo -^ 


Witnefs 


- 


Oran faxi 


Work (to) 


- 


Kredgia apapa, ancat kredgia 


Water (to make) 


- 


Koutchieng 


Watch 


- 


Bangan 


Wind ' 


- 


Anguin 


Wine 


- 


Angor 


(palm) 


- 


Sacaver 


Willing (to be) 


- 


Mao 


• 


Y. 


Year 


- 


Taun 


Yet , 


- 


Lagui 


Yefterday 


- 


Kalamaren 


. -^ (the day before) - 


Kalamaren daulou 


Yellow 


- 


Couning » 


Young 


- 


Mouda 


Yes 


- 


Bai 


Your 


- 


Pougnia 


You 


, 


Koe, lou 




Numerical Terms. 


One 


- Sato 




Two 


- Doua 




Three 


- Tiga 




Four 


- Am pat 


Five 


- , Lima 





APPENDIX. 



43 



Six 


- 


A nam 


Seven 


- 


Toudion 


Eight 


- 


Delapan 


Nine 


- 


Sambilan 


Ten 


- 


Sapoulou 


Eleven - ■ 


- 


Sapoulou fato, or fablas 


Twelve 


^- 


Sapoulou doua, or douablas 


Thirteen 


- 


Sapoulou tiga, or tigablas 


Fourteen 


- 


Sapoulou ampat, or ampatblas 


Fifteen 


- 


Sapoulou lima, or limablas 


Sixteen 


- 


Sapoulou anam, oranamblas 


Seventeen 


- 


Sapoulou toudiou, or toiidioublas 


Eighteen 


- 


Sapoulou delapan, or delapan bias 


Nineteen 


- 


Sapoulou faml)ilan, or fambilan bias 


Twenty 


- 


Doua fapoulou, or doua poulou 


Twenty-one 


- 


Doua fapoulou fato, or doua poulou 
fato, &;c. 


Thirty 


- 


Tiga poulou, or tiga fapoulou 


Thirty-one 


- 


. Tiga poulou faro, &c. 


Hundred 


- 


Saratous 


Two hundred 


- 


Doua raious 


Thoufand 


- 


CeriboLi 


Ten thoufand 


- 


Cequcty 


Hundred ihoufand 


~ 


Celaxa 



VOCABULARY OF THE LANGUAGE 

OF THE 

SAVAGES OF DIEMEN'S LAND. 
-ARMS (the) - Gouna lia 

B. 
Beard - - Conc;uine 

Branch of the eucalyptus 

wi;h its leaves - - Poroqui 



44 



APPENDIX. 



Bark of a tree 

Bird 

Baflcet 

Breafl: of a man 

of a woman 



- Toline 

- Mouta mouta 

- Terre 

- Ladine 

- here 



Here, as in many other inftances, lia placed at the end oft 
word indicates the plural number. 

c. 

Charcoal, reduced to pow- 
der, with which they cover 

their bodies « - Loira 

Cut (to) - - Rogueri, toidi 

Crown of Ihells - Canlaride 

Chin •> - - Onaba 





D. 


Drink j(to) 


- Laina 


Death, to die 


- Mata 


Diftance (at a) 


- Renaue 




E. 


Eat (I will) 


- Made guera 


Ears 


- Cuegni lia 


Eyes (the) 


- Nubru nubere 




F. 


Fingers 


- Lori lori 


Eamily (my) 


- Tagari lia 


Fire 


- Une 


Fly (a) 


- Oelle 


Fifh (fmall) of the fpecies 


of 


gadus 


' - Pounerala 




G. 


Go and eat 


- Mat guera 



APPENDIX,. 

Give me - - Noki 

'Greafe (to) the hair - Lane poere 



49 



GraCs 



Hair 

Hands 



I will go 



- Poene 

H. 

- Pelilogueni 

- Riz lia 

I. 

- Ronda 



K. 

Knees - - Ragua lia 

Kernel of the eucalyptus re- 



finifera 


- Manouadra 


Kangarou's Ikin 


- Boira 




L. 


Let us go 


- Tangari 


Lobfter 


- Nuele 


Lips 


- Mogude lia 




M. 


Me 


- Mana 


Me (for) 


- Paouai 


Mortal fthat is) 


- Mata enigo 


Mufcle (fea) 


- Mire 




N. 


Nofe 


- Muguiz 


Nanne of a man 


- Mara 


. Name (another) for a man 


- Mera 


Navel (the) 


- Lue 


No 


- Neudi 


Nails of the toes 


- Pere lia 


■ of the fingers 


- Toni lia 



46 APPENDIX. 





O. 


Oyfler-fhell 


- Louba 


Ochre 


- Mallaue 




P- 


Polleriors 


- Nune 



Pillow (a fmall) on which 

the men lean - -r Roe re 

Parrot - - Mola 

Plunge (to) - Bugurc 

FoliChing (the ail of) with a 

fliell - - Rina 

S. 
Sit down - - Medi 

Sleep (to) - - Malougna 

Sclerya (a fpecies of very large) Leni 



Sun (the) . 


- 




- 


Panumere 


Stone (a) 






- 


Loi'ne 


Sea weed, (a 


fpecies of) 






fucus ciliatus 




- 


Roman inou 


See (I) 


- 




- 


Quendera 


• 






T. 


That belongs to me 




- 


Patourana 


Tree of the fpecies eucalyptus 


Tangara 


That 


- 




- 


Avere 


Teeth 


-' 




- 


Pegui 


Throw (to) 






r 


Pegara 


Tongue 


- 




- 


Mene 


Tatooing 


- 




- 


Pal ere 


Trunk of the 


euca 


lyptus 




Perebe 


This way 


- 




- 


Lomi 





APPENDIX. 




W. 


Woman 


- Qiiani 


Will you come . 


- Qiiangloa 




Y. 


You 


- Nina 



47 



^W'JSr.*.'- 



VOCABULARY OF THE LANGUAGE 

OF THS. 

FRIENDLY ISLANDS. 



A. 



Agreeable (that is very) 


Mariche 


Armpit (the) 


- 


Ifae fine 


Arms (the) 


- 


Nima 


Arrow (an) 


- 


Houloumata 


Afraid (to be) 


- 


Feitama manavaee 


Applaufe (a term denoting) 




after a fong 


- 


Mali 


Awaken (to) 


- 


Haha 


Arife (to) 


- 


Tohou 




B 


1, 


Begone 


. - 


Hale atou 


Bring me that 


- ■ - 


Tougue maie 


Banana 


- 


Foudgi, aoba 


Beat (to) 


- 


Taha 


Bulla ovum (a 


(hell thus 




named) 


- 


Koepoule 


Broken 


- 


Foa 


Bed (to go to) 


- 


Togoda 


Brother (my) 


- 


Foenna, fanao 



48 



APPENDIX. 



Boy (a) 


-■ 


Tama 


Blow one's nofe (to) 


•i» 


Fangouyou 


Black, blue 


- 


Ouly 


Birds 


- 


Manou 


Balket (a) 


- 


Cato 


Bread (the) 


- 


Fatta 


Bofom 


- 


Houhou 


Bladder of a pig, blown 


- 


Monou manou 


Bring (to) 


- 


Tohague 


Bow (a) 


- 


Fana 


Beard 


. 


Koumou, kava 


Breakers 


- 


Cacaho 


Brother's younger brother 


- 


Teina 


Burial place 


- 


Tano 


Back (the) 


- 


Toua 


Bread fruit 


- 


Mei 


Beads (glafs) 


- 


Kahoa 


Bad 


- 


Kovi 


Bone 


. 


Houi 


Bread-fruit tree 


■- 


Toya 


Butterfly 


' 


Pepe, bebe 


Breathe 


- 


Malava 


Blood 


- 


Totto 


' 


C. 


Call (to) a chief, or a man i 


of 




the clafs of Moua 


- 


Maliou mai 


Call that (what do you) 


- 


koi-koa, koai hoinghoa 


Cerbera mangas (a garland 


of 




flowers of the) , 


- 


Kodgi ale 


Cocoa-nuts 


- 


Niou 


Cut (a) 


- 


Lave^ 


Cry out (to) 


- 


Yhoo 


Cold 


- 


Modgia 



APPENDIX. 



'^9 



Club (a) 

Canoe 

Carry on one's back (to) 

Clay 

Come hither 

Call (to) a man of the lower 

clafs, or a toua 
Called (that is) 
Chief (a) 
Caterpillar (a) 
Cut (to) 

Cut (to) with fciflbrs 
Child (a male) 
Cheeks (the) 
Columba aenea (a fpecies of 

pigeon) 
Chicken (a) 
Cough fto) - 

Cloaths (our) 



Akao 

Vaka 

Fafa 

Oummca 

Haele ma'i, hale mai 

Fogui mai 

Koi 

Egui 

Noufe 

TafFa 

Pipi 

Tahine 

Koae 

Touhou 
Moa 
Olea 
Papa langui 



D. 



Depart (to) 
Drive away (to) 
Drefs vidluals (to) 
Day after to-morrow 
Drefs one's felf (to) 
Die (to) 
Drink (to) 
Dog (a) 
Dance (to) 
Defcend (to) 
Day (the) 
Dart (a) 



Hael atou 

Halo, halo 

Moho 

Anoya 

Poulou pouloir 

Mate 

Inou 

Kouli 

Iva 

Halonifs 

Ao 

Tau 



4 



60 



APPENDIX 



E. 



Eldeft fon 

Eldeft daughter 

Eaft wind 

Excrement 

Evening (this) 

Earthen vefTel to hold water 

Exchange (to) 

Equal 

Eat (to) 

Ear 

Earth (the) 

Eyes (the) 



Toagucde 

Tofi, fine 

Mantangui, meelaa 

Meokovi 

Apou 

Coulo 

Fokatau 

Tata, oupc 

Hala 

Telinga 

Tongoutou 

Mata 



F. 



:'j 



Friend (a) 


- 




- 


OfFa 


Friendfhip for (to have 


a) 




Cahou 


Fingers 


- 




- 


Touau 


Female 


- 




- 


Nafa 


Feaft (a) 


- 


/ 


. 


Mee 


Fire 


. 




. 


Afi 


Flute (a) 


- 




- 


Fangou, fangou 


Fruit of the 


inocarpus 


edulis 


Mahoa 




eugenia 




- 


Mafanga 




Fifli (a) 


- 




- 


Ika 


Fine 


- 




- 


Lelley, lelleyi 


Forbidden 


- 




- 


Tabou 


Fan (a) 


- 




- 


Toito 


made o 


f a Jeaf of the 






corypha 


- 




- 


Biou 


Another kind of 






Aye 


(to) 


- 




- 


Hallo, halo 


Fifli-hook 


- 




- 


Ipa 


Father 


. 




> 


Tamai 


Feet (the) 


- 




- 


Afouivao, afevae 



APPENDIX. 



51 



G. 



Go (to) walk. 


- Hael 




Girl (a young) 


- Mamadgie 




Great 


- Lai 




Great chief 


- Egui lai' 




Give (to) 


- Mahi 




Give me fomething 


- Mamaco, omi, omea, 


magou 


Gain one's point (to) 


•^ Tahou 
H. 


- 


Have not (I) 


- Ongouikaie 




Hats (our) 


- Poulonga 




Hatchet 


- Toki 


, 


Hibifcus rofa finenfis 


- Kaouttc 




Hibifcus (another fpecies of) Yabau 




Hufband 


- Mocoe 


•* 


Head 


- HouloUj 




Hair 


- Oulou 


'■■ ■• '■■' 


How mucli 


- Afeya 




Here, there 


- Hini, hine 




He, or her 


- Hana 




Hand 


- Afenima 




Hole (to make a) 


- Fauto 
I. 


.. f 


Iron 


- Oukamea 




Ifland 


- Cau 
K. 




Knock down (to) 


- Lave 




Knife (a) 


- Hails 
L. 




Lie down (to) 


- Fanao 


. • ■'- 


Love (to) 


• Mamana 
d2 





52 



APPENDIX. 



Lizard 


. 


Fokai 


Lean 


- 


Cauno 


Little 


- 


Tchi 


Leap (to) 


- 


Hobau 


Look at that 


- 


Tchiana 


Legs (the) 


- 


Fouivae, vaee 


Lips 


- 


Longoutou 


Linen, as handkerchief, 


&c. 


Holoholo 


Looking-glafs 


. 


Tchioata, tchiautta 


Lice 


- 


Lohi 


Let me fee 


- 


Maumata, mai'mata 




M. 


Mouth 


_ 


Moudoii 


Moon (the) 


- 


Maheina 


Mark (a) on the cheek, < 


Dcca- 




fioned by a blow 


. 


Fouki 


Me - 


- 


Ogou 


Mother of pearl 


. 


Laoulahou 


Man (a) 


. 


Tongata 


Mifs one's aim (to) 


. 


Hala 


Mother 


- 


Nafa 


Mount (to) 


. 


Kaka 


Mufic 


- 


Hangui 


Mat (common) 


- 


Nafi, nafi 


Mat (a) fine fort, ufed 


for 




cloalhing 


■' 


Kil 




N 


• 


Now 


. 


Ini, Hene 


Needle, for fewing 


.. 


Itoui, Heoui 


Neck (the) 


- 


Guya 


Navel 


- 


Hingoa 


No 


• 


Hoa 



APPENDIX. 



53 



North wind 




- 


Matangui toguelao 


North-eaft wind 




- 


Fonga fouloifoua 


North-weft wind 




- 


Fagatohiou. 


Nail (a) 




- 


Fau 


Nutmeg (large) not aromatic 


Cotone 


Nofe (the) 




- 


Eou 


Night 




- 


Paolli 


Not 




- 


Ikai, kai 


Name 




- 


Hingoa 


Natives of the loweft 


clafs 




but one 




- 


Moua 


Natives of the loweft clafs 


. 


Toua 



o. 

Ornament of red feathers worn 



on the head 


- Poulao 


Orange 


- Moly 


Open 


- Tatanha 


Open that cocoa-nut 


- Oyou 


Old 


- Moudona 




P. 


Pig fa) 


- Boakka 


Parroquet (blue headed) 


- Haingha 


Prefent (I make you a) 


- Adoupe 


Peel fruit (to) 


- Fohi 


Poflefs fomething (to) 


- Amou 




R. 


Ring (a) " 


- Mama 


Rudder 


- Foeouli 


Rough play 


- Leagui 




^3 



54 



APPENDIX. 



Rub (to) a piece of wood 
againft a larger one, to pro- 
duce fire - - Tollo 

Relations (near) - - Anaoua 



^{ 



Sit down 


- 


Nofe- 


Sew together (to) 


- 


Filou 


Stick (a) 


- 


Taha 


Sugar-cane 


'- 


To 


Scar on the belly, from a 




wound by a javelin 


- 


Ta, obitouagui 


Shell (a) 


- 


Fighota 


Seize (to) 


- 


Faghi 


Side (on the others 


- 


Ahoue 


Sleep (to) 


" 


Moe 


Scratch (to) 


- 


Ivagou 


Shoulder (the) 


- 


Ouma 


Sneeze (to) 


- 


Ifangou 


Stuff (a) made with the 


bark 




of the mulberry tree 


- 


Gnatou 


Shave (to) 


- 


Fafaya kava 


Sandal-wood 


- 


Kai fidgi 


Sifter's younger brother 


- 


Toughane 


Sing (to) or a fong 


- 


Oube 


Sky 


- 


Laghi 


Sciflars (a pair of) 


- 


Pipi 


Side (on the other) 


- 


Aliki 


Spoon (a) 


- 


Hebou 


Spoon (a great) 


- 


Lahihe, lahihebou 


- (a fmall) 


- 


Tchie, tchiebou 


Salute (to) by touching 


with 




the nofe-end, that oj 


f the 




perfon faluted 


- 


Houma 


Star. (a) 


- 


Fidau 



APPENDIX. 



55 



Son {a) 


- 


Oulou kalala 


Shut (to) 


- 


Tabouni 


Screech-owl 


- 


Loulou 


Shed (a large) 


- 


Alto 


Shew me 


- 


Behangue 


Shark 


- 


Netoufi 


South witid 


- 


Matangui^ tonguf 


South-weft wind 


- 


Coeoulou 


Sore (a) 


- 


Pala 


Sieve (made of coarfe 


ftufF 




, for draining kava 


- 


Faou 


Sea (the) 


- 


Tahe, tahi 


Straw colour 


- 


Kao 


Skin 


- 


Coquili 


Sifter 


- 


Fae 


South-eaft wind 


- 


Alagnlfannoua 


Sweat (to) 


- 


Ikacava 


Sail (a) 


- 


Boulou boulou 




T. 


To (prep.) 


- 


Hi 


This, that 


- 


He 


Thigh 


- 


Tainga 


Tortoifeftiell 


- 


Ouno 


Throat (the) 


- 


Houa 


Tongue (the) 


- 


Ileo, leo 


Tail of a bird 


- 


Mou'i moi 


Tatooing 


- 


Male, tatau 


in large rings round 




the waift 


- 


Alia peka 


' the thighs 


■ - 


Foui 




the 




arms and (houlders 


Ita'i 


To-day 


- 


Ana'i 




d4 



56. 



APPENDIX. 



Timber- work of a houfe 


- Fata 


Teeth 


- Nifo 


That is 


- Anga 


Throw (to) 


- Ilafou, lafou 


Toe (the great) 


- Moudoua vahe 


Tacca pinnatifida (fruit of the 


plant of that name 


- Maia 


Tatooing, in the form 


of 


large worms 


-. Kafa 


Term of approbation 


- Coia 




- TflTah 




** A.ii6m 


Thunder 


- Paoulou 


Turtle-dove (red headed) < 


co- 


lumba fanguinolenta 


- Koulou koulou 


Twift (to) 


- Tatao 


Thief (a) 


- Kaya 


Tell me your name 


- Eyoeia 




u. ■ 


Uncover your head 


- Codchi nolele 




W, 


Wing 


- Cabacao 


White 


- Ina, maha 


Warm 


- Mafanna 


Woman (a) 


- Vifine 


Wife (to have a) 


- Hoanna 


Weft wind 


- Matangui- l.oulougha 


Weep (to) 


- Tangui 


Whiftle (to) 


- Mabou 


What is that 


- Koaia 


Wood 


- Lahoubaba 


Water 


- Ovai 


Wicked • 


- Kino 



APPENDIX, 



57 



We 


- Yta 


We two 


- Yta oua 


Walk 


- Momiho 


Wind (the) 


- Matangui 




Y. 


Yawn (to) 


- Mamao, mamaoya 


Yellow 


- • Melo 


You 


- Coe, hae, he 


Yefterday 


- Aneafi 


Yes 


- loj hio 



One 
Two 

Three 

Four 

Five 

Six 

Seven 

Eight 

Nine 

Ten 



Numerical Terms. 

- Taha 

- Oua 

- Tolou 

- Fa 

- Nima 

- Ono 

- Fidou 

- Valou 

- Hiva 

- Ongofoulou 



To count 20 they repeat the numbers from i to 9 inclu- 
five ; and when they come to 20 they exprefs it by oua fou- 
lou (twice 10); to count 30, after having reckoned 20 in 
the manner juft mentioned, they begin again at i and count 
to 9: thus, tatra, oua, tolou, fanima, ono, fidou, valou, 
hiva ; and to exprefs 30 they fay, tolou ongofoulou (three 
limes 10) ; to reckon 40 they repeat i, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 
9 ; and to exprefs 40 they fay faongo foulou (four times 
10) ; thus 50, nima ongofoulou ; 60, ono ongofoulou ; 70, 
fidou ongofoulou ; 80, valou ongofoulou 5 90, hivo ongofou- 



58 



APPENDIX. 



lou; 100, tehaou ; 2oo, ona tehaou ; 300> tolou tehaou j 

400, fa tehaou ; 500, nima tehaou ^ 600, ono tehaou ; 

^00, fidou tehaou ; 800, valou tehaou ; 900, hiva tehaou ; 

1000, afey; 10,000, kilou afey ; 100,000, manoi 1,000,000, 

panou ; 10,000,000, laouale ; 100,000,000, laounoua ; 

1,000,000,000, liagui ; io,oco,ooo,ooo, tolo; 

100,000,000,000, tafe ; 1,0.0,000,000,000, lingha j 

10,000,000,000,000, nava ; 

100,000,000,000,000, ka'imaau ; 

1,000,000,000,000,000, talomaguitaugha kaVmaau ; 

an infinite number, oki. 



i>iS>3e«9«Si 



VOCABULARY OF THE LANGUAGE 

OF THE 

NATIVES OF NEW CALEDONIA. 





A. 


Armpits 


- Hanbeigha 


Arms (the) 


- Hingue 


Alk him 


- Hia 


Ant (an) 


- Hinki 


Afcend 


- Tamihiou 


Are you well ? 


- Alaoue 


Awaking • . 


- Noda 




B. 


Begone 


- Boeno 


Belongs (that) to me 


» Quine 


Bread-fruit tree 


- Yen 


Banana tree 


• Pouaignait 


Beard (the) 


• Poupouangue 


Back (the) 


- Donnha 



ri 



APPENDIX, 



59 



Bark of the hibifcus lilia- 
ceus, from -which they 
extract a nutritious juice 
by chewing 

Breech (the) 

Bird (a) 

Birds 

Baflcet (a little) 

Bad (that is) 

Bread (the) 

Breathe (to) 

Blood 

Bofom rthe) 

Belly (the) 

Blow (to) with one's mouth - 



Paoui 

Pouckhouenguee 

Manou 

Mani mani 

Tolam 

Qiiedenl 

Guiengue 

Kniana 

Houda 

Tingue 

Kiguienguq 

Oubedou 



c. 



Called (that is) 

Cap (a) 

Chief (a) 

Chief (a) above the abouma - 

Cocoa nuts 

Cocoa tree 

Cholic 

Cock 

Cord 

Cord (a fmall) which they 

ufe in throwing their ja 

velins 
Cord (a piece of) which they 

■wear round the neck, 

from which is fufpended 

a piece of hard well po- 

iiihed ferpentine ftone - Peigha 



Anan 

Tanene poulou, mouea 

Theabouma 

Aliki 

Niou 

Nou 

Yahick 

Ho nemo 

Mouep, maho 



- Ounep 



60 



APPENDIX. 



Child (a) 


- 


Neyne 


Cold 


- 


Guiaen 


Cheeks the) 


- 


Foangue 


Comb (a) 


- 


Gau, baliga 


Club (a) 


- 


Boulai'bi 


Chin (the) 


• 


Pouangue 


Canoe 


- 


Wa, oacka 


Chicken 


. 


Hali 


Cultivated land 


- 


Maniep 


Cough (to) 


- 


Poupe 


Come hither 


. 


Ame 



Dance (to) 
Death 



Di 

- Pilou 

- Mackie 



E. 



Enough 
Eyelafhes (the) 
Elbow 

Exchange (to) 
Ear (the) 
Eat (to) 
Eyelids 



Hongui 

Poutchibanghie 

Bouanguelen 

Oubin 

Guening 

Houyou, abou 

Banguinghe 



In the laft word the fyllable gum is pronounced in the 
throat, after the manner of the Arabs. 



Earth (the) 
Ear-holes 
Eyes (the) 



Guioute 
Ktiogueningue 
Ti wangue 



APPENDIX. 



61 



F. 



Friend (a) >«• 

Fine (that is) 

Forbidden (a thing) 

Fingers (the) 

Fan (a) ■ 

Fire 

Figs, which they eat drefled 

Forehead (the), 

Fifh-hook 

Foot (the) 

Fly (a) 

Fall (to) 



Abanga 

King king king, fpoken 

quick 
Tabou 
Badonchigha 
Bahoula 
Afi, nap, hiepp 
Ouyou 
Bouaridaguan 
Pouaye 

Bakatiengue, adegha 
Nan, ignan, about 
Telouch 



G. 



Good (that is) 
Give 
Give me 
Glafs beads 
Great 
Granates 



Kapareck 

Padeck, oumi, name name 

Nanhi, hambaling 

Baoui', pino 

Amboida, pagoula 

Pagui 



H. 



Hut (a). 


- 


Moi 


Hair 


> 


Poubanghie 


Hungry (I am) 


- 


Aouab 


Hatchet 


- 


Togui 


Hedge (a) 


- 


Baubeigh 


Hand (the) 


- 


Adeliegha 


Head (the) 


- 


Bangue 



62 



APPENDIX. 



Horizontal beam, at the 
height of about two yards 
in their cottages - PaVto 

Hole (to make a) - Keigui 



I. 



Itching (an) 




- Hion 


Iron 




- Pitiou 


Ifland (an) 




- Gniati 


I have none 




- Adigna 


I will not 




- Boudou 


I will carry you on 


my 


back Tabouneys, moteraaneyo 


Immediately 




- Guiot 
J. 


Javelin (a) 




- Nta 


Knees (the) 




- Banguiligha 
L. 


Lie down (to) 




- Guiahoura 


Leaf a tree 




- Cata 


I-eg 


) 


- Popiguiengue, boudagnasr 


Let me fee that 




- Melekia 


Little 




- Anneba 


Linesof a black colour made 


on the breafl: 




- Poun 


Laugh (to) 




- Eck 
M. 


Mouth (the) 




- Wangue ' 


Mallard (a) 




- Oubane 



APPENDIX. 



63 



More 


- 


Magn 


Man 


- 


Abanguia, tchiau 


Moon (the) 


- 


Manoc, ndan 


Magnificent (that is] 


- 


Boukaie boukaie 


Maft (a) 


- 


Kniep 


Mother 


- 


Moubreba 


Me (that is for) 


- 


Aoutou 


Mountain (a) 


- 


Bandouc 


Mat (a) 




Kam, abono 
N. 


Nail (a) 


- 


Dobiou 


Neck (the) 


- 


Nouheigha 


Nofe 


- 


Wanding 


Navel 


. 


Koanbougha 


No 


- 


Nda 


Nails (the) 


- 


Pihingue 



o. 

Ornament of mother of 

pearl, with which they 

adorn their heads - Tanden 

Opening (the) which ferves 

as an entrance into their 

huts - - Ouenema 



P. 



Path (a) 
Potatoe 
Parroquet 
Prefent (that is a) 
Poft (a) placed in the mid- 
dle of their cottages - Aguyotte 



- Taca, ouandanc 

- Tani 

- Pidip 

- Tanhouate 



^>4 

Pledge (a) 
Poultry 



APPENDIX. 

- Malabou 

- Ho 



Quartz 



- Nette 







R. 


Run away (to) 




- Keremoi 


Rain 




- Oda 


Root of the dolichos tube- 




rofus 




- Yale 


Red 




- Miha 



s. 



Spider (which' the favages 




of New Caledonia eat) - 


Nongui 


Shrub (of the fpecies lepto- 




fpermum 


Poap 


Stop (to) 


Guioute 


Sit down (to) 


Tamo 


Sugar-cane r 


Kout, ounguep 


Sing (to) 


Hote 


Scar of a wound from a dart- 


Do 


Sky (the) 


Ndaoe 


Shell, called bulla ovum 


Bout 


Shells 


Palile 


Spit (to) 


Kioutma 


Salute (to) by touching 




■with the end of the nofe 




that of theperfon faluted, 




asat Tongataboo 


Bangoming 


Shoulders (the) 


Bouheigha 


Sneeze (to) 


Tibouaie 



APPENDIX. 



65 



Stuff (a coarfe) refembling 
that made of the bark of 
the mulberry tree 

Strike (to) 

Sleep (to) 

Sling (a) 

Scratch (toj 

Sling (to) a ftone 

Sea (the) 

Swim (to) 

Stones prepared for flinging 

Sole of the foot 

Sack of ftones for flinging • 

Sun (the) 

Spider's web 

Sail (a) 



Tree (a) 

To day 

That 

Thigh (the) 

To-morrow 

Teeth (the) 

There is none 

There is no more 

T<^gue (the) 

Tie (to) 

Thumb (the) 

Take 

Tails (falfe) which they 

wear 
Tatooing 
Tomb 



Wangui 

Tamaet 

Kingo anoulen 

Ouendat 

Mangaitte 

Ole 

Dene 

Hat 

Oudip 

- Adagueigha 

- Qiienoulippe 

- Nianghat 

- Donhete 

- Mouangha 

T. 

- Gniaouni 

- Heigna 

- Hi, hehine 

- Hengue paan 

- Padoua 

- Paou wangue 

- Hadipat 

- Mai 

- Koupe wangue 

- Tighing 
Kanohingue 

- Pone pone 

- Bouligha, neguv 

- Nap 

- Nbouavt 
c 



66 APPENDIX. 

Thunder - - Highou 

Tie (to) a cord to any thing Houadine 
Thief (a) - - Kaya 

U. 

Untie (to) - " Tibic 



V/ell (that is) 
Wood 
Warm (it is) 

Way (that is the) 
Wound from an arrow- 
Water - ! 
Woman, or girl 
Wife (my) 
Went away (he) 
Walk (to) 
Weep (to) 
What is that 
Whiftle (loj 
Water (to make) 
Wind (the) 



Yawn (to) 



One 

Two 

Three 
Four 
Five 
Six 



W. 

- Flo 

- Kiantie 

- Qudoa 

- Taga 

- Undip 
. Oe 

- Tamomo, tama, 
^ Yabaguenne 

- Tatao 

- Tanan 

- Ngot 
Beta, anda'i 

- Whaou 

- Nima 

- Oudou 

Y. 

- Obalam 



Numerical Terms, 

- Ouanait 
. - Ouadou 

- Ouatguien 

- Ouatbait 

- Ouannaim 

- Ouanaimgnik 



APPENDIX, 



67 



Seveii 

Eight 

Nine 

Ten 

Eleven 

Twelve 

Thirteen 

Fourteen 

Fifteen 

Sixteen 

Seventeen 

Eighteen 

Nineteen 

Twenty 

Twenty-one 

Twenty-two 

Twenty-three 

Twenty-four 

Twenty-five 

Twenty-fix 

Twenty-feven 

Twenty-eight 

Twenty-nine 

Thirty 

Thirty-one 

Thirty-two 

Thirty-three 

Thirty-four 

Thirty -five 

Thirty fix 

Thirty- feven 

Thirty-eight 

Thirty-nine 

Forty 



- Ouanaimdou 

- Ouanaimgueen 

- Ouanaimbait 

- Ouadoun hie 

- Baroupahinck 

- Baroukarou 

- Bafou kat gueiu 
>- Barou kat bait 

- Barou kat naim 

- Kaneimguick 

- Kafteim dou 

- Kaneim guein 
Kaneim bait 

- Kadoun hie 

- Kaningma 

- Karou 

- Kat guein 

- Kat bait 

- Kanneim 

- Kanneim guick 

- Kanneim dou 

- Kanneim guein 

- Kanneim bait 
KaJoum lick 

- Barekalininck 

- Bare karou 
Kat guien 
Kat bait 

- Kanneim 
Kanneim guick 

- Kanneim dou 

- Kanneim guein 
Kanneim bait 

- Kadounhink ounguln 

62 



68 



APPENDIX. 



VOCABULARY OF THE LANGUAGE 

OE THE 

NATIVES OF Vv^AYGIOU. 



Arms (the) 


- Bramine 


Arrow (an) 


- Mariai 




B. 


Bow (a) - • 


- Copamme coufFe 


Bananas 


- Imbieffe 


Bracelets of tortoifefhell 


- MifTe 


Bofom (the) 


- Soufife 


Belly (the) 


- Sneouaran 


Boat (a large) 


- Cadourefle 


(afmall) 


- Houahy 




c. 


Cocoa-nut 


- Scrail 


Cord 


- Camoutou 


Cotton fluff 


- Sanfounne 


Chin 


- Bourou bourOtJ 


Canoe 


-' Cambafene 


Crab (a) 


- Coaffe 




D, 


Drink (to) 


- Quinemme 


Dog (a) 


- Dofane 




E. 


Embrace (to) 


- Cofroec 


Eat (to) 


- Aenne, yacanne 



APPENDIX. 



69 



Eye 

Ear (the) 
Earth 



Fifli hook 

Fifhing-line 

Father 

Feet (the) 

Fifh 

Forehead 



Go (to) 

Go away (to] 

Go 

Give me 



Hair (the) 

Harpoon (a) 

Hand (a) 

Hen (a) 

Head of an harpoon' 



- Mocammoro 

- Q^ienany 

- Soupe 



F. 



Sarfedinne 

Farfere 

Mama 

Effouebaem 

Icanne, hienne 

Audary 



G. 



Combraenne 
Orofuperre 
Combran elfo 
Bouguemen, orbouqman 



H. 



Enombraem 

Ambobere 

Brampinne 

Mafanquienne 

Enacandenne 



Iron 

I am going 



Knife (a) 
Knees (the) 
Knot fto tie a) 



Moncormme 

- Yaborefle 

K. 

- Moi 
Fonierenne 

- Cocafe/fe 



70 



Lemon (a) 

Ltg 

Lobrter (a large J 



APPENDIX. 
L. 

- - Innecrail 

Anemine 
- Saraoire 



M. 



Mouth (the) 
Mafl (a) 
Mother 
Me 

Mat 



Souadonne 

Padarenrie 

Naine 

Aia 

Yaerenne 



Needle 
Neck (the) 
Nofe 

New-Guinea 
Nails (the) 



N. 

- Mari iffou carmora 

- Sacecaeran 

- Nony 

- Mari, or mare 

- Brampinne bey 



Oar (ati) 



o. 



CaborefTc. 



Potatoes 
Packthread 
Pavilion (a] 
Pledge (a) 



- Randzio. 

- Ribbc 

- Barbaran 

- . Decaenne 



Sugar-cane - - Camaenne 

Straw hat of a conical form - Saraou 



APPENDIX. 



71 



Sleep (to) 


- 


' 


Qiieneffe 


Soft water 


- 


- 


Houaerenne 


Scoop (a) for a 


boat 


- 


Canarenne 


Stuff made of i 


the bari 


: of 




trees 


- 


- 


Maran 


Stuffs (our) 


which 


they 




demand in exchange 


for 




their commodities 


- 


Decaille, cami 


Switch (a) 


- 


- 


Aye 


Sea (the) 


- 


- 


Mafainne 


Ship (a) 


- 


- 


Capara 


Speak (to) the 


Papou 


lan- 




guage 


- 


- 


Papoua doberea 


Sciurus palmarum 


- 


Ranbabe, couchou 


Saffron (Indian) 


- 


Inaerenne 


Sago 


- 


- 


Qiiioumi 


Sail (a) 




T 


Caouenne 


That is 


^ 


_ 


Omi 


*rhumb (the) 


- 


- 


Brapoucre 


Thigh (the) 


- 


- 


Hoiieffope 


Teeth (the) 


- 


- 


Nacoerenne 


Tin 


- 


- 


Saraca, faiuca 


Tongue (the) 


- 


- 


Damaran 






W. 


Walk (to) 


- 


- 


Coreffe 


What is that 


- 


- 


Aziarofa 




Numerical Terms. 


One 


~ 


_ 


Sai" 


Two 


- 


- 


Dou'ij foro 



72 APPENDIX. 

Three - - Quioro 

Four - - Fiaque 

Five - . - Rima 

Six - - Onem 

Seven - - Fique 

Eight - - Ouaran 

Nine . • - - Siou 

Ten - - Sarapourou 

Hundied - - Caim 



APPENDIX, 73 



. - TABLES 

OF THE 

ROUTE OP THE ESPERANCE, 

DURING THE YEARS 

1791, 1792, 1/93, and 1794, 

^ROM THE TIME OP HER LEAVING EUROPE TILL HER 
ARRIVAL AT SURABAYA. 



N. B. Thefe tables fhew the pofition of the velTel at noon . 
the variation of the needle diilinguifhed hy fr.^ when obferved at 
the horizon at fun-rife ; hy Jf., when obferved at the horizon at 
fun-fet ; and by 02., when it is the refult of an azimuth obferva- 
tion; the degree of the thermometer according to Reaumur's fcale 
(it was a thermometer with mercury), the height of the barometer 
at noon; the diredion of the wind and the Hate of the weather. 



u 



APPENDIX. 



TABLES OF THE ROUTE OF THE ESPERANCE. 



Date. 

1791. 



September, ir 
30 
Odtober. 

3 
4 
6 
8 
so 

12 

At Teneilffe. 1 3 

25 
26 
27 

28 



November. 



24 



Latitude 

North by 

Obfcrvation. 



4-7 4.1 20 
4.7 7 30 



45 46,36 
45 36 38 
42 49 58 
38 23 29 

34 8 
29 26 iS 

28 29 55 

25 22 9 

23 31 59 
21 32 45 

19 58 47 

17 5^ 
14 56 49 
13 6 19 



10 23 49 

9 ^ 36 

9 7 

9 I 

8 23 



49 38 



I 36 

45 29 

9 34 

00 46 

5i 54 
32 56 



5 3 ^9 

4 42 26 
4 30 3 
4 28 39 

3 49 00 
3 16 55 



Latitude 

North by 

Computation. 



47 43 00 

47 2 00 

46 46 30 
46 35 10 

45 59 20 
45 38 00 
43 3 18 
38 27 00 

34 4 14 
i-9 32 38 



25 21 36 
23 41 20 
21 24 38 

20 3 19 

17 53 00 
14 52 00 

13 5 44 

12 8 18 

10 26 2 

9 6 19 

8 55 36 

8 59 38 
8 22 00 
7 43 H 

7 9 4 

6 47 3 

53 38 
19 25 
56 26 

44 34 

31 19 

13 40 

3 46 

4 4^ 58 

4 4^^ ^9 
4 =3 38 

4 17 39 

3 30 46 
2 59 00 



Longitude 

Weft by 

Obfcrvation. 



Longitude 

Wert by 

Computation. 



— 




— 


10 


^3 


00 


II 


14 


24 


n 


58 


00 


17 


25 


00 


18 


53 


10 


18 


3S 


12 


20 


16 


36 


20 


59 


46 


21 


55 


30 


22 


24 


12 


23 


»9 


54 


22 


35 


43 


21 


28 


00 


21 


6 


00 


20 


53 


45 


20 


38 


10 






" 


19 


49 


50 


19 


46 


12 


19 


49 


10 


19 


47 


14 


19 


46 


24 


20 


6 


18 






— 


20 


12 


45 


10 


26 


36 


18 


38 


24 


18 


56 


18 


20 


49 


13 



9 36 40 

10 24 18 

10 59 30 

10 56 18 

10 38 00 

11 17 10 

13 47 36 

16 24 12 

17 48 14 

18 36 36 



19 24 32 

19 59 36 

20 44 10 

21 71; 
21 29 38 

21 37 40 

21 25 38 

21 12 19 

20 10 00 

9 iS 19 
9 24 36 
9 15 18 
8 49 30 
8 23 12 



S 19 17 

8 6 34 

8 4 18 
8 6 12 
8 8 37 
8 14 50 
8 27 36 
8 59 
974 

8 47 

8 34 10 
8 8 37 

8 7 12 

8 45 10 

9 56 00 



Variation of the 
Needle Weft. 



22 36 00 











fr. 


21 39 00 






ff. 


19 59 00 



fT. 18 56 00 

fr. 18 9 9 

fr. 17 38 10 

fr. 16 44 GO 



ff. 
ff. 


15 

»4 


19 
32 


oo 
00 




— 




— 


(T. 


12 


43 


00 


fr. 


12 


39 


20 



ff. 14 38 00 

fr. 14 20 20 



fr. 
ff. 



13 34 00 

I? 36 32 

13 39 18 

13 59 4 



fr. X3 42 36 
fr. 14 36 3 



APPENDIX. 

TABLES OF THE ROUTE OF THE ESPERANCE. 



75 



Variation of the 
Needle Weft. 



September. 29 

30 
Oftober. 

2 

3 
4 
6 
S 

JO 

J 2 

»3 

25 
26 
8.7 

^8 

30 
I 

2 
3 
4- 
5 
6 

7 

S 



Z2 

J3 
»4 
»5 

18 

»9 

10 
21 



az. 21 10 57 



az. 21 26 ou 



az. 19 29 00 



az. x6 38 00 

az. 16 49 37 
az. 14 47 34 



Therm. 



az. 14 15 35 



az. 14 37 z4 
az. J4 49 36 

az. 14 26 30 



16,0 
16,0 
16,1 
16,2 

14.4 
16,5 
16,0 
17.1 



Barometer. 



1. 

2,9 
3.7 

3.9 

4,2 

3.6 
1,0 
3.6 
2,9 
2,9 
3.8 



28 2,0 



19,0 

19. 5 
19,5 

19,0 

19,8 
21,0 

22, 
21,8 
22,2 
22,8 
22,8 
22,5 
22,3 
22,5 

2J,7 

21,9 

22,9 
22,9 

23,0 
22,5 
22,9 
22,5 
22,0 

22,0 

22,0 
21,3 



22,0 
21,6 



28 



3.0 
2,8 

8 3,0 
,8 2,5 



28 



3.0 
2,6 

2.5 
2,9 
2,9 

2,4 

2,3 
2,8 

2,2 
2,4 



28 2,8 

28 3,0 



Wind and State of the Weather. 



1.9 
2,0 

1.9 
2,0 

2.5 

2,0 

1.9 
2,0 
1,8 

I.I 

o,S 
1.2 



E. Pretty briflc, cloudy 

E.S.E. Calm, overcaft 

N. Variable, calm, overcaft 

W.S.W. Calm, overcaft 

N.W. Very little wind, overcaft 

W.N.W. Brifk, overcaft, hail 

N.N.E. A fine breeze, cloudy 

N.E. Briflc, hail 

N.N.E. Brifk, overcaft, bail 

N, A fine breeze, fair 

C N. A fine breeze, dear, after- 

l wards cloudy. 
N.E. Rather brifk, cloudy 
N.E. A fine breeze, fair weather 
E.N.E, A frcfb breeze, very fine 

k E.N.E. A frefh breeze, cloudy, 

i afterwards clear 
N.E. Little wind, fair 
N.E^ N. Light breeze, clear 
N.E.^ N. Fine breeze, cloudy 
E. Variable, overcaft, Iformy 
N.E JN. Brifk, cloudy 
N.E. Brifk wind, cloudy 
Calm, cloudy, Itorroy 
Calm, ftormy 

N.E| E. Very little wind, ftormy 
E.NE. A light breeze, ftormy 

C E.S.E.Brifk, variable, cloudy, 

I rain 

CE N. E. Very little wind, 

X cloudy, afterwards fercne 
Calm, ratlier cloudy 
E.S.E. Little wind, fair 

8.E. Very little wind, fair 

!?.£. Hail, calm, overcalf, rain 

S.S.E. Little wind, cloudy 

S.S E. Little wind, rain 

Calm, rain 

5 S.S. W. Little wind, fair; af- 

l terwards rain 

S S.V/. Variable,brlfk, very wet 

S.S-W. Guitsof wmd, hail, rain 
C E.S.E. Nearly calm, overcaft, 
I rain 

^.S.E. Moderate breeze, hail 

S.S.E. fine breeze, hail 



f2 



76 



APPENDIX. 



TABLES OP THE ROUTE OF THE ESPERANCE. 



Date, 


Latitude 


Lati'tude 


Longitude 


Longitude 


Variation of the 


17,91- 


North by 


North by 


Weft by 


Weft by 


Needle Weft. 




Obfervation. ( 


IJomputation. 


Obfervation. Computation. 








/ " 


t It 


' " 


' /' 




' " 


November. 25 


2 58 00 


a 53 34 


22 6 12 


20 54 00 


ff. 


14 28 36 


z6 


* 5 37 


2 I 55 


23 19 36 


21 33 4 


ff. 


12 29 00 


27 


I 20 19 


T 17 57 


24 19 20 


22 14 7 


ff. 


M 42 00 


28 

■ 


30 55 
UATITUDt. 

■ fouth. 


36 35 
LATITUDE, 
fouth. 


25 17 13 


22 38 49 


Ir. 


II 18 00 


29 


39 12 


26 12 


26 19 36 


23 19 3c 


ff. 


10 44 51 


30 


I 3^ 49 


I 34 19 


27 12 18 


24 6 IC 


do. 


8 46 00 


December. i 


2 34- 49 


2 34 20 


28 12 17 


24 36 10 


do. 


8 19 24 


2 


3 5^ 25 


3 49 35 


29 4 lo 


24 59 38 


do. 


S 58 47 


3 


5 10 26 


5 4 26 


30 8 3 


25 29 37 


do. 


7 49 iS 


4- 


6 28 35 


6 15 54- 


30 42 36 


25 56 14 


do. 


7 14 5^5 


5 


7 34- 31 


7 24 34 


30 58 14 


26 a 6 


do. 


6 56 18 


6 


9 2 36 


8 57 19 


31 19 26 


26 S " 


do. 


5 24 48 


7 


10 34- 26 


10 24 25 


31 43 40 


26 24 36 


do. 


5 26 30 


8 


II 43 12 


II 38 56 


31 38 17 


^5 59 38 


do. 


3 49 19 


9 


12 46 33 


12 33 18 


31 8 14 


25 28 34 


do. 


4 16 56 


3 


14 14 24 


14 4 25 


,30 29 38 


24 38 39 


do. 


3 58 00 


11 


15 4* 46 


15 41 26 


29 43 12 


23 43 39 


do. 


4 8 54 


' V ' 3 2 


16 56 13 


16 47 48 


29 6 38 


23 6 32 


do. 


5 13 36 


13 


18 6 20 


17 56 28 


28 38 40 


22 39 42 


do. 


5 00 00 


'4 


19 9 36 


19 6 34 


28 19 34 


23 26 10 


do. 


5 17 26 






20 32 19 


28 26 12 


22 26 18 


do. 


4 46 00 


15 




36 


22 16 27 


22 3 59 


28 38 44 


22 27 12 


do. 


5 18 17 


?7 


23 48 14 


23 27 13 


29 15 36 


2 2 54 10 


do. 


4 18 4& 


38 


25 20 32 


25 9 24 


29 27 18 


23 19 4 


ir. 


I 56 39 


39 


26 35 17 


26 32 27 


29 29 4 


23 7 14 


do. 


2 54 00 


2C 


27 28 25 


27 18 59 


28 18 3S 


22 8 3 


do. 


3 36 00 






28 6 44 


25 43 10 


19 48 2 


ff. 


4 46 34 


21 






28 49 48 


28 32 59 
28 33 36 


24 6 36 

22 44 34 


iS 9 4 
16 49 3 






%1 




23 










27 49 58 


27 57 2? 

28 19 3-: 
- ,29 16 3C 


22 9 36 
22 26 iS 


1623 6 

16 44 7 

17 22 18 
17 16 j8 






24 




*5 
26 








29 33 54 


22 54 iC 
. -^ 3« 17 






27 


30 44 45 


30 42 5^ 






2S 


31 16 2J 


- 30 5^ 5^ 


- 21 56 14 


16 26 ig 


ff. 


5 3^ 30 


as 


31--32 5^ 


" 31 23 2^ 
31 38 44 


r 19 49 38 


14 34 17 

12 46 14 


fr. 


6 14 49 


3"^ 


31 49 3; 


I- 17 45 ^7 






3' 


32 6 \', 


32 4 3 = 


- 15 44 ^2 


10 58 J1 


fr. 


5 54 ^2 



APPENDIX, 



71 



TABLES OF THE ROUTE OF THE ESPERANCE. 



Date, 

1791. 



Variation of the 
Needle Weft. 




Wind and State of the Weather. 



November. 2 5 
a 6 
27 
a8 



December. 



az. 12 16 56 
az. II 33 19 
az. II 23 14 



az. 8 39 5 



21,9 

21,5 
21,7 

21,2 



21,3 
21,2 



fr. 7 22 54. 21,3 



az. 7 36 j8j 21,4 

fr. 6 -^9 49 21,5 

az- 5 24 55 2x,5 

fr. 5 18 17! 21,6 



3 44 i^ 
3 58 36 

3 48 00 



II 


Ir. 


.4 


5 


00 


12 


az. 


5 


18 


12 


13 


az. 


5 


49 


54 


14 


az. 


5 


3 5 


1 1 



24 

25 
26 

,-,1 



az. 5 i8 36 

az. 4 65 

az. 2 36 44| 

az- 3 33 39 

az. 4 i8 53 



az. 5 52 36 



az. 5 49 32 



28 az. 6 46 



az. 6 ^5 o( 



6 i( 



21,0 

20,7 

20,5 
20,5 

20,5 

20,3 
20,2 

20,3 

20,4 

19. 5 
19,0 

i9'4 
19=4 
19,0 

19 = 3 

iS,o 
17,6 
18,6 



i",7 

17.8 
17.8 
17,6 



Us 



i>3 



2,1 

1,8 
^>3 



.6 2,0 

8 2,1 

.8 2,3 

.8 2,7 

,8 2,7 

:8 2,8 



I '8 
ii8 



2>5 
2,8 
3'5 
3>6 



28 


3.9 


18 


4,0 


28 


4,2 


i8 


2.,9 


28 


5>- 


i8 


-^-o 


z8 


4.5 



3 5 



3,^ 

5.3 

4.0 

, o 

4>5 
3.9 
3>9 
3 9 
c.o 



S.S.E. A moderate breeze, hazy 

Ditto 

S.E. A light breeze, hazy 

S.EJ S. Moderate breeze, fair 



Ditto 

il^. Moderate breeze, hazy 
C S.E. MoJerate breeze, hazj'', 
\ atterwards clear 
CS. EJ E. Moderate breeze, 
\ hazy, fair 
Ditto 

E.S.E. Light breeze, hazy, fair 
E| S.E. Light breeze, hazy, fair 
El S.E. Fine breeze, hazj', fair 
E. Moderate breeze, hazy, fair 
^ E| N. E. Moderate breeze, 
\ hazy, fair 

e E.N.E. Moderate breeze, fair, 
\ a little rain 

N.E;: E. Fine breeze, hazy, fair 
Ditto 

5 From N.E. to E. Fine breeze, 
}_ hazy, fair 

£5 N.E. Moderate, hazy, fair 
£. Light breeze, fair 
5Ei S.E. Guftsof wind, fhow- 
i ers of hail 

E|: S.E. Mod. breeze, hazy, fair 
£' S.E. P'ine breeze, hazy, fair. 
Ditto 

R. Moderate breeze, overcaft 
5 From E. to N. Moderate br. 
i fair, rather hazy 
CN. N.W. Moderate breeze, 
\ fair, rather hazy 
<. N. W.W.N.W. Light breeze, 
2 cloudy, rain 
W.S.S E. Briflc, cloudy 
b.S.E. E.S.E. Briikgale, cloudy 
S.E. Fine breeze, cloudy, r:iin 
I'.Eg: E. Moderate breeze, cloudy 
K. Moderate, cloudy, fair 
N.E.N. Little wind, fair 
N'iN.E. Moderate, fair 
M. Moderate, fair 
ln'.N.E, Moderate, fair 



78 APPENDIX. 

TABLES OF THE ROUTE OF THE ESPERANCE. 



Datz, 

179 a. 


Latitude 

South by 

Obfervativin. 


Latitude 

South by 

Computation 


Longitude 

Weft by 

Obfervacion. 


Longitude 

Weft by 

Computaiion 


Variation of the 
Needle Weft. 






' " 


'•' 


/ // 


' " 


' '/ 


January, 


3 

2 


3* '9 55 


31 22 34 

3* x8 38 

32 35 44 
3a 42 24 


n 34 39 

9 35 17 

9 8 49 

7 12 17 


9 4 8 


Tr. 5 49 18 
do. 7 57 19 

do. 10 55 24 




• 3 
4 


3* 4-2 43 
32 49 34 


7 9 *3 

4 59 J2 
3 14 8 




S 


34 55 46 


32 51 38 


5 59 14 


2 14 7 


ff. 13 37 28 


.-r... 


6 
7 


3* 56 40 
3* J5 40 


32 52 37 
32 48 12 


4 17 12 

I II 10 

tONGITODE 

ealt. 


39 18 

LONGITUDE 

eaft. 
2 z6 19 


do. 14 44 00 
do. 16 3 29 




8 


3i 58 17 


S* S6 34 


I 53 36 


5 23 36 










9 


3« 57 3« 


32 3 24 


4 3 18 


7 2 34 


do. J 7 49 00 




JO 


33 00 *4 


32 58 56 


4 46 19 


7 35 39 


fr. 20 14 00 


• 


12 


3« 47 36 
3* 55 »4 


30 z 14 
33 3 24 


5 i7 34 
7 14 19 


8 14 36 

9 49 H 


ff. 21 54 49 










33 


32 52 J2 


32 59 12 


8 53 48 


11 34 42 


fr. 21 46 00 


' 


34 
15 


33 14 54 
33 36 30 


33 23 26 
33 40 10 


10 44 17 
12 6 16 


13 12 48 

H 32 H 


fl". 22 17 2% 
fr. 22 54 36 




26 


34 3 29 


34 S 18 


15 37 10 


17 3 12 


fr. 24 14 16 


At the Capt 
of Gooc 
Hope. 

February. 


17 
18 

J 9 

20 
ai 


34 8 54 


34 17 4 
34 12 3 

34 38 44 

35 52 42 
35 9 »^ 


J7 24 36 
19 27 48 


16 8 34 

15 33 10 

16 24 18 

18 14 36 

19 38 47 


ff. 24 19 34 






fi". 23 10 49 
(i\ 25 14 19 




34 46 19 
34 59 16 








»^. 


34 55 54 


34 54 14 


20 8 45 


20 19 58 


ff. 26 19 5 


- 


13 
»4 


34 35 19 
34 l5 12. 


34 4^ 50 
34 17 52 


22 12 4 
24 42 10 


22 17 54 

25 26 12 


fr. 25 42 10 
fl". 27 25 00 




25 
i7 


34 12 00 


33 55 »2 

35 9 14 

35 5 10 


24 18 13 

26 4 20 
27. 3 3^ 


25 16 4 

24 48 00 
27 24 00 


fr. 27 14 00 

ff. 28 10 TO 
fr. 28 12 14 




35 24 10 




38 


35 18 46 


35 22 4 


28 22 34 


28 8 14 


a: 28 6 14 




29 


r 


3 5 35 43 




29 46 32 


do. 28 J 2 00 


Marcli. 


I 


35 J6 36 


3 5 22 5+ 


32 59 4 


32 37 34 


do. 28 34 3 




2 


34 45 34 


34 59 26 


35 43 36 


36 13 34 


do. 28 46 00 



APPENDIX. 7^ 

TABLES OF THE ROUTE OP THE ESPERANCE. 



Variation of the 
Needle Weft. 



az. 6 6 55 

az, 6 56 00 
az. 9 59 z5 
az. 13 34 59 

az. 13 4.6 18 

az. 15 18 49 



56 



at. 16 39 

az. 17 31 

az. 19 19 

az. 10 2^9 

az. 21 59 44 

az. 22 14. 32 

fl'. 23 i3 4.S 




17,7 



az. 15 38 39 18,0 28 x,7 Nf N.W. Brifk, fai 



2S 



28 



4,0 



4.9 



Wind and State of the Weather. 



rN.N.E. N^N.E. Moderate, 

I hazy, fair 
Ditto 

NJ N.R.N. Breeze, hazy, fair 
NJ N.E.N. Moderate, fair 

CN.N.N.E. Little wind, clou- 

1 dy, fair 
N. Moderate, fair 



az. 


24 iS 55 


az. 


24 t2 36 






az. 


Z3 16 10 


az. 


24. 59 12 


az. 


26 39 8 


a: 


25 4.8 00 


az. 


£7 1 5 00 






az. 


28 17 59 


az. 


28 9 36 


az. 


28 18 36 


az. 


28 58 00 


az 


28 24 36 



i>5 



1,9 



N.N.W. Fine breeze, clear, 

afterwards hazy 
H. N.W. N^ N.E, Little 

wind, fome rain, fair 
N.W. Little wind, afterward* 

calm, fair 
W.N.W. Very little wind, 
. fair, afterwards foggy 
W. Very little wind, fair, hazy 
f W.S.W. W. Moderate, hazy, 
I afterwards clear 
VV. Mod. hazy, afterwards clear 
W.N.W. Moderate, haz^, fair 
N.N.W. N. Fine bi^eze, 
cloudy, fome rain 



S.S.E. Squally, cloudy, rain 
S. S.S.W. Moderate breeze, hazv 
3.S.W. W.S.W. Mod. br.hazjr 
W. N.N.W. Erifk, cloudy 
N.W. Fine breeze, cloudy 

f W.S.W. N.N.W. Light br, 

I tolerably fair 
W.N. W.W.Bn(k,tolerablyfine 
W.S.W. A fnurt gale, fair, hail 

VEIrN.E. Smart gaic> aftei 

l_ v/ards iioht breeze, clear 
E N E. N.E^ Smart pale, fine 
N.W. Light breeze, fair 

f S.W. Liitle wind, aftciw.-.rdi 

I ca m, fair 
N.E. Mod.br f.ur,afterw, cloudy 

yW. W.N.W. Bnfk, rtoriny, 

I then fair 
N.W. Fuie \n\ fair, rather cloudy 



$0 



APPENDIX. 



TABLES OE THE ROUTE OF THE ESPEB.ANCE. 



Date. 

I79-- 



■'4 



Latitude 

South by 

Obfervatioii. 



31 



34- 32 00 
34- 35 37 



34- 4-1 52 



35 23 1^5 
34- 54 14 
g 



35 4'- 

36 2a 
36 44 

36 43 34 



37 16 49 

3<5 13 44 

36 53 5i 

37 57 55 

38 a 47 
38 12 38 

38 30 37 

38- 20 42 

35 9 45 
37 15 44 

36 49 36 

37 4 49 

36 48 50 

37 33 <> 
3S 45 34 

39 23 34 

39 54 49 

40 42 26 
40 56 18 



3 40 45 10 

41 3 36 

41 34 00 

42- 5 18 



42 15 :6 



Latitude 

South by 

Computation; 



34 32 H 

34 38 44 

34 40 54 

34 4^ 34 

34 41 36 

35 29 M 
35 6 2 

35 54 34 

36 8 14 
36 44 52 

36 48 34 

37 II 39 

36 18 4 

36 49 34 

37 46 ^4 

38 4 36 
38 6 27 
38 9 4 
38 ^4 3 

38 28 14 

38 22 45 

37 14 36 

36 5+ 33 

37 18 49 

36 54 12 

37 33 48 

39 -4 12 

39 30 58 

40 7 55 

41 2 26 
41 9 18 

40 34. oc 

41 19 26 

41 46 II 

42 18 14 

42 17 10 
42 32 16 



Longitude 

Lift by 

Obfeivation. 



Longitude 

Eaft by 

Ci/tTiputation 



V.iriation of the 
Needle Weft. 



38 14 18 

42 22 12 

43 36 4'}- 

44 3 35 
44 54 18 

47 4 34 
49 25 32 
5^ 54 38 

53 13 19 

53 33 46 

54 5 43 

54 3:9 24 

55 53 52 



59 12 

60 18 


34 
20 


61 54 


36 


64 16 


12 


68 4 

68 43 
70 48 
72 8 


18 

47 
10 
10 


74 24 


18 


80 4 


32 


82 23. 


36 


84 59 


H 


88 14 


^9 


90 26 


18 


93 59 
96 58 


4 
38 


lOo 25 


19 


106 35 


36 



38 x6,54 

40 

42 

43 T4 



8 3 



44 8 13 

44 58 4 

46 22 2, 

46 58 3 

49 14 J 3 

52 44 36 



52 



^6 12 



53 34- 6 

54 9 34 
54 38 34 

56 8 52 

57 49 12 

58 45 10 

60 4 8 

61 33 16 

64 18 oc 

66 34 20 

67 59 32 

68 38 44 
70 58 10 
7' 59 4 
74 8 19 
77 51 4 
79 48 2 

82 14 49 

85 3 40 
87 4S lO 

90 22 14 

93 5 4 
'96 41 38 

100 18 8 

104 7 3 
106 49 39 



fr. 30 36 52 



{T. 



27 34 19 



fT. 26 

Ir. 26 

ff. 26 

fr. 26 

ff. s6 

fC. 24 

fl". 24 



49 50 
30 00 

34 38 



24 00 

13 15 

49 39 
26 00 



fT. 24 
I'r. 25 

fr. 23 

ff. 24 
ir. 23 



59 00 
32 19 

19 48 

46 38 
48 15 



fr. 23 14 52 



fr. 20 
fl". 20 

a. 17 



6 19 
15 12 

43 39 



fl- i5 4 53 



fr. 18 16 10 
(T. 19 8 10 

fT. 13 14 11 



APPENDIX 8: 

tAtlES OP THE BOUTE OF THE SSPERANCE, 





, 








Date, 




VariiDon ot thi 








179^- 




Needle Weft. 


rhtn. 


') 11 


oir.eu 




' " 





1. 


ATarch. 


3 


zz 30 4.S s 


18,5 


8 


3.0 




4 





18 


, 


3=3 




5 




17.' 


-g 


2,4 








6 


?z. 28 56 20 


IS, 7 


■s 


3.0 




1 


az. 27 14 14 


17 


zi 


4>o 




% 


_^ 


iS 


-.8 


39 




9 





>5: 


iS 


5>" 




10 





16,. 


8 


6,- 




i\ 


az. 26 54. 19 


17,0 


%% 


3 




Ja 




'7,0 


1 8 


2,9 




13 


az. 26 4.5 3^; 


16,^ 


z% 


5 -^ 




14 


az. 26 39 00 


16,0 


18 


5.0 




15 





i5.<», 


zS 


63 




i5 


az. 24 5z II 


J4,8 


^8 


70 




x;' 


az. 24. 37 4 


15 


28 


5.9 




18 


az. 25 41 00 


16,0 


8 


5.0 




^9 


az. 24 26 0. 


160 


28 


6 




ao 


az. 25 36 24 


16 


z% 


6.5 




ai 


az. 25 36 00 


15.0 


28 


5 5 




aa 





15.0 


28 


3:8 




23 





13.9 


28 


36 




■24 


_ 


ISO 


28 


56 




25 





13 3 


28 


6 




26 


az. 79 3*. 54 


14 


28 


5 0, 




27 





«3.s 


8 


58 




28 


fr. 18 44 56 


15Q 


28 


1 




29 


— 


15 


zS 


11,1 




30 


. 


13 


V 


10,0 




31 


— 


JO,C 


27 


'».9 


April. 


J 


az. 13 24 jc 


io,c 


28 


7 




2 


^ 


I0,O 


27 


9.0 




? 


az. 17 44 4S 


85 


28 


2.5 




4 




12,1 


28 


2>3 




5 


az. 17 59 16 


12 5 


28 


3.0 




6 





13.0 


28 


3.^ 




:r 


•■-^ ■ 


11. 


28 


».7 




i 


fr. 14 5? 52' 


io,S 


28 


3.0 



Wliul jnd State ot L.he Weather. 



N. Pretty Virlrtc, fa'r 
f N E. iN. Biik, afterwards 
i liftlc vv.'ii;!, vcrv cloudy 
iSI.El- N. M(J: br. cloutiv, raia 
V'L\.W. Modcjiite, artiwards 
X caim, 'air, laihercl u 'v 
..S E. S. Liglu breeze, cloudy 
E.S.E N N.S. Lir'ht fcr.ciouay 
Fio;nN.W.,(,S d W. 'ir. cloudy 
5 E.S.E. E.N.F. Fine biecze, 
I cloudy a lutle rain 
.^.E. -!'•,. N N 1£ Finebr.clcvidy 
N.N.i{. Fine bretrze, cloudy 
CNN.E. Little wind, then 
X calm, cloudy, afterwards fine 
5E.6E. E.N E. Very light 
I brwere, dark 
:-: S.E. S.S-E. Mod br. darh 
S E. E. Modciatc breeze, dark 
£ N E Moderate breere, dark 
N.F. N.N. W. Mud. br. dark 
VV.N VV. N. W L ght br. t.ifr 
N N E N.E. Vciy light br. fair 
fl-.N.E. N.N.E. 'Moder>tc, 
X Very fine 

N N.l'.N N.W.Briik-vind fair 
W.S. Brifk, fair, then cloudy 
S'. S.> E. Brilk, cloudy 
S.' S S '»V. Light breeze, fair 
W S. Miderate Sreeze, fair 
i>.W S.E Light breeze, fair 
N.N.VV. i.-:rifk. h.-zy 
N'.N.W. Biiflc, afinebr. hazy 
C W. N. SquaKy, cioujy, ahttie 

C N.W S. W. Hail, brilk wind, 
I hazy, h.iil 

5 W.b.W. N. N.W. Strong br. 
X lia7y, hai! 

cN.N.V/. S.S.W. Strong br. 
X ha-'V. much hail 
C S.S.W. Strong br. hazy, much 
\ haii . 

S.W. N W. Finebr. h-.zy, fair 
W.N.W i* ):.e '^reeiej huzy, fair 
CW.N.W. N.W. strong br. 
I c oucy, fair 
cN.v^'. Brifk. W.S.W. Mo- 
l derate, cloudy, na^y, rain 
W.S.W. W. A tine br. hazy 



g 



82: 



APPENDIX. 



TABLES OF TH2 ROUTE OF THE ESPEUANCE. 



_—*————' 


L.ititude 

South oy 

Obfrvation 


Latitude 

bouth by 

>mpatatio .. 


L'Jilgitude 

E..ft by 

Obfcrv.dlio'i. 


Longitude 

Eft by 

Comput tioi' 




Datf, 

179a. 


V<.;ia'J',n oF the 
Needle VVttt. 






' " 


' // 


' " 


> " 




' "■ 


April. 


S 

10 

It 




42 36 34 

42 59 32 

43 '4 43 




110 8 12 

114 35 J.L 


ir. 


14 18 30 


116 59 18 




4-i 54 33 












12 




42 42 46 

41 36 12 

42 3 10 
42 18 19 

42 42 15 
44 7 5+ 




119 36 2 

120 51 4 

123 32 :; 
127 27 3 
129 41 4 
131 32 li 


ff. 


8 14 19 








17 


41 2 5C 

4^ 5 i& 

42 24 25 


123 48 I ? 

128 42 11 


IT. 














1 54 00 
E.iit. 




18 




44 32 35 


136 14 4 135 i3 i& 


(T. 


294 




19 


43 3a 53 


44 33 24 


138 22 3 139 5 19 


Ir. 


1 59 3^ 


At Dieman's 

Laud. 

May. 


so 

14 
16 

25 
26 

27 


43 48 55^ 

43 3^ 19 

43 30 53 


44 8 32 


141 59 32 

144 48 4 


141 59 30 

144 48 2 

145 14 4 
145 18 2 

145 22 I 

145 24. 2 

146 57 19 

150 3 8 


ff. 


5 56 40 


43 33 36 
43 21 13 

43 5 a 
43 36 
42 35 3a 
40 55 4 










43 10 5£ 




















43 38 23 


746 54 19 








2y 
30 














31 


39 12 34 


39 18 2 




152 4 1 







June. 


I 
2 
3 


37 »& 4' 

35 '^4 3" 
34 43 57 


37 14 36 
35 28 14 
34 5'- 3^ 


153 48 13 

155 38 14 
■ 156 12 18 


154 20 19 

155 5^ S° 

156 28 4 


fT. 

ir. 


10 50 4 
10 8 00 




4 


34 35 4/ 


34 26 4 


158 4 8 


157 46 2 


ff. 


n 22 4» 


, 


5 
6 


• 34 5^ i£ 


34 33 48 

34 -54 12 
32 42 48 

-9 3S' 54 
2S ' is 4z 

-7 38 5 

■ 27 '9 It: 
25 48 44 
24 42 2 . 


159 42 54 

16 1 18 24 

162 52 14 

163 13 4 

164 23 10 
16^ 13 4 

165 28 46 


159 IS 3 

159 10 2 

161 18 54 

162 29 6 

163 i{ 36 
163 3s 34 
1 54 14 8 
165 8 10 
165 1} 46 

165- 24 6 


Jr. 


" 5S 34- 




34 45 52 

32 3^ 3'? 
29 5a 54 
2S 21 46 






/ 


V 
8 

9 

10 
1 1 
12 

13 


Ir. 
fl" 
if. 
Ir. 
fl; 
fl. 


12 38 50 
II 54 5» 
II 23 34. 

It 18 IX 

I I 42 09 
II 58 14. 




27 10 40 
25 51 25 
24 42 II 

24 18 oc 




H 


24 12 4.;. 










15 

16 


23 57 43 
23 6 J4 


23 57 31 
23 8 24 


165 18 oc 
^65 13 00 


165 24 oc 
164 59 oc 


fl" 


II 19 3» 

10 40 %9 



: APPENDIX. 83 

TABLES OF THE ROUTE OF THE ESPERANCE. 



D Alt, 

1792 



April. 



18 



v'iirution ot u 
Needle Weft. ih.rni | BaroTi. 



Wind and State of the Weather. 



14 
j6 



3 34- 4 

Eali. 
2 34. 

5 51 I 



11,8 

" 5 
to,/ 

9-0 
9,2 

«.5 
10,0 

12,0 

12,5 

I2;0 
^1.5 



28 



^7 



Ji,6 



0;5 
3.0 
7 5 



N.W. A fine bree7e, hizy, fair ' 
N'.W. Bi ilk p,. cl')udy,a artlerain ' 
N W. W. Moderate br. cloudy 
'S,W. S. Moderate breeze, 

ftjually, c'oud.y, fleet 

£. S S.E. Verv (q. cl. fleet 

S.E. W S.W. Biiflc, tair, fleet 



27 1.0,0 S.W. S.nartp-. fqually, ha7y,llcet 
■'^8 3,1 ^V.S-W.Fineb,.f:ur,ratherhazy 



tS 



4j7 



4>5 

28 ij 



v'.S.W. Smart gale, cloudy, fleet 

C W.S.W. W. Fine breeze, 
C cloudy, fume riin 
5 VV. Fine hr, cloudy, a little 
d rain at night 
VV. Fine br. cloudy, much rain 



^z- 7 38 42 \- 



az. 8 26 37 



az 


-7 


4.S 


' 














— 


— 




az 


9 


56 


59 


az 


1 1 


38 


3 


az. 


II 


48 


00 


a^. 


11 


53 


39 


ir. 


13 


8 


12 


.1Z. 


1 1 


8 


4 "5 


az. 


1 1 


38 


5' 


az. 


10 


45 


19 



8,0 

10,0 

10,2 

9 ° 

9,0 

9>^ 

12,0 

,12,5 

13,0 

14 8 



■ 27 

27 

.28 

18 



60 
94 
■')'j 
30 

2'7 



27 11,0 



103 
7,5 



27 ii;5 

28 0,5 
28 30 
i8 4.0 



14,8 jzS 3,5 
15,0 J28 0,3 



140 

15,0 

15 o 

J5;5 

16 o 
16 4 

17,0 
J 8,0 

18,0 



■ 7 no 



28 



xo o 

0.5 

2 5 

3>o 
2.3 

-»9 

3 •- 

3 4 

3.5 
3)6 



S.W.. Squally, rain, fleet 
N. M 'derate breeze, fair 
N. Mod. breeze, hazy 
W. Little wind, fair 
Calm, c'oudy, fome rain 
Amjita cea-l ca m, fair 
f Caim, a-br ft: N. wmd, ftrene, 
i atterwards h izy 
i^.VV. S.\f\\ Crilk, cl. foaie rain 
S.vV.S.S.vV Smii-tg. cl. fleet 
CS.S.E. ;.Mna;t ^aie, very un- 
i ravoiiiabk weath-r ' , 

ii. S.S.E. Mod br. cl. tlnn clear 
.^. Mod. br. t.iv 

S.W. N.W. Light br. fair 
5N.N.W Littii vvinl, after- 
t wards nio .. br. tar hazv 
tN.N.W. N.N.E. Gulh of 
t wmd, ci. rain m the nigut 
i N. W. Very varia'tue, 1i tie 
I wind, fliormy, cio idj, r in , 

J VV. S. Moc. br. haz), fl«.et 

^.W, Fme br. hdzy 

S. W.^Mod. br. hazy 

S.W. LioJK br thtn calm, cloudy 

W.N. W.N.N ^V.Ligntbr.fair 

i\.W. VV. .Mod. br. ta.. 

\V. W.S.W. Light b'. hazy 
4 W.-^.W. W.N.W Li^;htbr. 

I atcciwa <is cai::i, ci'udy 

-. Vv . Vt:ry lit' e win '. cloudy 

W.S.W. Light or; lerene 



S^ 



^^ APPENDIX. 

TABLES OF THE ROUTE OF THE ESPI:RA.K'C^. 



Dhts. 

1792. 



At New 
J;tland, 



Siiu;h by 
Obferva-i .r.. 



LatHuJc 
Sputh by 
li>fr. utaiion 






, 


// 


■zz 


4-9 


3B 


23 


4 4^ 


zz 


4.2 


i3 


22 


6 


42 


21 


49 


34 


21 


3^ 


i^ 


21 


45 


27 


21 


3« 


19 



21 


^2 


5S 


21 


20 


4f 


20 


s8 


00 


20 


6 


^ 


?9 


26 


49 


18 


47 


54 


i2 


9 


16 


17 


21 


18 


16 


46 


5i 


15 


45 


48 


14 


27 


39 


'2 


48 


16 


10 


52 


34 


S 


51 


14 


7 


26 


43 


6 


59 


32 


6 


13 


24 


5 


43 


14 


5 


5 


53 


4 


5« 


£ 


4 40 


5S 


1 


2 


51 


39 


2 


43 


45' 


2 


^Ir 





22 56 2 

22 59 4 

23 4 4^ 

2i 39 00 

22 9 34 
21 44 36 

3^ 34 
3/ a;^ 
30 4S 

32 44- 
24 26 
29 44 

9 14 

19 27 54 

18 57 00 

iS 5 52 

17 32 46 

16 45 48 

15 54 48 

14 17 59 
12 48 46 

10 56 19 

8 47 17 
7 31 4 
6 58 44 

6 37 26 

6 24 52 

5 44 34 
5 22 4 

5 5 30 

4 4S Oc 



4 41 P' 

4 4 31 

3 4^ 00 

a 53 1.5 
a 29. 36 



Longituue 
. Enft by 
. 'bfVrvati 



164 4-^. oc 
i-!4 35 3J 
164 7 4+ 

164 7 9 
163 36 52 



162 49 38 

iSz 46 2 

162 39 28 

162 36 39 

162 22 2^ 

161 27 30 



Longitodt 

Eai\ by 

Cornputition 



V>riatio • jl the 
JNCtdlc Eaft. 



i6i 


9 48 


i6o 


34 6 


^59 


56 44 


159 


32 36 


^57 


38 2 


155 


59 ^ 


154 


34 7 


152 


54 9 


15^ 


18 12 


15- 


9 4^ 


152 


5 li'' 


152 


6 


15J 


8 4. 


150 


J7 3 


148 


18 43 


147 


9 7 


145 


44 52 







65 3 oc (T. 10 34 54 
64 24 37 ciJ. 10 17 46 

64 16 41 vio. 10 38 12 

63 24 50 

63 29 3^ 
63 00 00 

62 49 }2 
62 38 

6z 29 
62 14 
61 43 



01 >2 
61 19 

60 40 
00 48 

JO IT. 
60 22 



'o 33 
I a 26 
10 34 

10-54 
io 00 

1 u 'J 

9 45 

q 6 



?o 

24 

S 

7 

00 

48 
38 



5^ 

59 34 40 

58 54 8 

57 49 !<> 
36 18 44 

55 17 14 

54 34 
53 8 17 

52 46 18 

52 30 4 

S"' 5 44 
52 2 54 
5152 8 
51 35 

SO 33 



150 24 00 
149 36 4 

148 48 40 



147 S 

146 36 22 



(10. 9 14 19 

do. 8 17 4S 

(.io. 8 9 38 

Uo. 8 34 00 

do., 3 ]+ CO 



fri 6 44 26 



do. 6 19 38 
fl". 6 4^ 38 



AFPENDIX. 



TABLES QP THjE i^OVTE QP THE ESPERANCE. 



D.lTE, 


"— --r 


V-iriirii-.n ot th 






' 


1:92- 




Nepdle Eiift. 


Tnerni. 


B.iromcier. 


Wind and State of the Weather. 


June, 


17 


' " 
fr. II 59 ?, 




i8,o 


p. 1. 

i8 2 6 


S.W. Very little wln(^, dark 




iS 


1.. 11 4 37 


18,0 


iS 2,0 


S.W. Light Hieeze, very fine 
Cb.S.W. W.S.W. Ligiu br. 
I lair, theu ha/y. 




19 


fr. 10 52 39 


17,0 


i8 1,9 












JS. S.3.W. Light br. briflc, 
^ h.izyi tail - 




20 


— " — ' 


16 < 


zS 1,9 




21 


IV. 10 8 CO 


17,0 


18 3.3 


$.3 W.S.S.E.Mod.br.ha2y,fair 


^ 


22 


.... 


17 7 


^■i 3.3 


!j.E. Ligiu breeze, hazy 




25 


,_ «__^ 


18,0 


•8 1,0 


*:. N.eI^ N. Lig-.t br. hazy, f ir 


w 




fr. 10 8 00 


18,0 


8 !i,o 


KiMmv^.VV. oS.W'. Mod.br. lair 




25 


az. 10 4 3c 


18, c 


^8 3.U 


^.W. S S.W. Md- br. ttir 




26 


fr. 9 53 38 


18,0 


8 2,3 


S.W. Mod. br. lighibr. hazy 




»7 




17,9 


'.8 3»5 


S-S W. Li':;h'- bieeze, hazy 




2g 


, 


17,0 


■-3 4.0 


5.S.I5. i^ine breeze, lleet 








iS 


■8 4.0 
^3 4'0 

l3 2;9 


^ E. E.S.fc. Fiiu br. bnflc, hazy 

Ji;..S.E, .4o... b: . hizy, licet, ram 
ci.S.E. E. Mod. br. cu rain 




29 




18,3 

19,0 


J«5y. 


30 






J 




20 


'8 5,5 


E. Mo *. br. c uudy 




3 


- 


2 1,0 


28 ^-;3 


f£.N.E. N.E. Light br. cloudy 
CE.N'.E. N.E. Light br, ci. 
I a'ti-rwar 's I'erene 




4 


fr. 9 $ 00 


22, c 


.8 *,Q 












cN £ S.b.E. S E. Light br. 
I clouoy, ih n lerene 




5 


fr. 9 4. 00 


io,4 


3,8 Jji 




6 




20,0 


28 i>i 


6.E. $.S E. Mud. br. hazy 




7 




20,0 


28 ^>6 


S.E. h.S.F^. Mod. br. hazy, rain 
fS.S.E. Mod. br. rain, after- 
l w.irds lertne 












8 




20,5 


aS ijS 








9 


37, ? 23 15 


21,0 


23 Jj4 


i.S.E. Mod. br. tloudy, hazy 




10 




21 


2,^ i>o 


b.S E. Mod. i->r. clouJy, hazy 




11 




21,6 


iS o>5 


5 S.E. Bnlk gale, cloudy, v/ith 
l fiiowtis of rain 
















^ S.E. E.S.E. Bri^ gS'f* c5. 
I with fhowers of rain 




17 




22,0 


23 i>o 




53 

15 




210 


^;^ 1-4 
. >j 1 .0 


"i.e. E.S E. Fair breeze, cloudy 
S.E. E.S.E. Fine br. rather ci. 






2Z 




az. 4 48 7 


22;0 


'0 * 5^ 

i8 I50 


E.S.E. S.S.E. Finpbr. fair 




j6 




22,0 


28 I'O 


j S E. S. F ne br. rain, after- 








l wards fair 




17 


, 


22,0 


28 1.3 


S.S.E. Fine br. cloudy 




24. 




2 2 


8 1-4 


SS E, Mod. br. violent rain 




»5 





21,.-' 


'.3 i,S 


J. S.E. Med. hr. cloudy, fleet 




26 




21, C 


'.S 0,9 


. E.S.E. S.E. Fine br. cloudy. 










I pretty fair 






■' 


' 21 ^ 


28 06 


c S.E. Fine breeze, ftonny, af. 
\ terwards fair, variable 




27 


IV 1. 


21,2 




a8 


5 24 49 


22,0 


i3 0,4 


S.E. Mod. breeze, fair 



86' APPENDIX.- 

TABLES' OF THE ROUTE OF THE . ESPERANCK. 



Liti'uJe I Lititjdc: 
South hy I Somh .y 



25 
30 

3' 

X 

2 
3 
41 

5 
6 

7 
S 



13 

14 

-'5 
16 

jS 

19 
20 
21 

22 
23 



2 19 5. 
I 45 oc 

J 56 00 

252 

I 32 o 
I 37 17 

I 36 5 
I 18 00 

o 45 39 

o 17 24 

o 3 19 

N rth. 
o 9 oc 

o 17 5?. 

o 26 39 






ro 


37 


South 







5 


3 




N 


6 

01 th 


34 





7 


29 





14 


12 





9 


4 


Sc 


uth 







'7 


30 





13 


46 





12 


37 





2S 


46 





46 


i4 



s iS 3^ 

2 6 34 

2 912 

s 10 '5 

I 35 3 
I 4y 47 

I 49 5 
1 I 3 4 J 

P 53 39 

o 26 34 

o 7 47 

o 1 00 

North. 



Loogiiu^e. 

i,Jlt by - 

Ob(erv.i'.i6n, 



145 44 4(_ 
145 28 43 
144 59 46 
,143 4i 3^ 

142 34 10 
141 I a. 






10 


£2 





i2 


43 


So 


iitli 


. 





I 


32 





17 


3!^ 





17 


34- 





6 


^^ 


Nc 


jrtii 







2 


14 


So 


uth 


. 


6 


8 


38 


c 


18 


14 





19 


29 





^9 


14- 





15 


37 





33 


59 





55 


19 



i-S 


P 58 44 


I 


!9 25 j6 


I 


7 46. 30 


i^ 


6 38 12 


^35 59 43 


135 16 54 


134 38 12 


133 32 oc 


133 3s 26 


13 


3 13 46 



13- 19 12 

i3'i 57 36 

331 45 ic 



130 54 3 

J 30 24 46 

130 6 15 

1-9 35 34 

128 56 33 



Longi ude 

La It by 

C 'tDpur;! ion 



145 49 46 

145 18 4c 

144 5Z 46 

144 13 36 

141 ^3 18 
141 49 4 

141 22 12 
139 24 56 

137 59 -6 

136 36 8 
135 55 46 

^5 19 44 

134 36 8 
134 9 38 

133 36 38 

133 ^a 54 
'32 39 56 

132 18 I 

132 2 2: 

131 48 3' 



Vai lacion o tne 



u . 6 629- 
00. 6 4 00 

do. 5 59 CO 



do. 



5 12 14 



; fr. 4 8 36 

ff. 3 17 45 

do. 4 iQ 30 

■do. 4 6 18 

do. 4 5 4 

do. 2 54 16 

do. 2 i3 26 



do. 3 4 36 

do. 2 6 16 

do., 2 24 17 

do. 2 28 46 



do. 2 6 



44 



131 i3 17 do. 1 43 36 



130 55 2 

130 24 48 

130 12 15 

129 39 35 



do. I 36 24 

cio. I 14 6 

do. o 49 4 

129 2 34 do. o 48 54 



APPENDIX. 87 

TABLES OP THE EOUTE OF THE ESPERANCE. 



/ariafiOn of .h 
NeeJie Eait 



-f 



az. 6 4-? 4.8 



Jr. 6 24 36 



az. 4 36 49 



4| az. 3 49 8 

5I fr. 4 8 4A 
) 

6'j Tr. ' 3 22 

fr* 3 9 5S 

fr. 3 8 45 



fr. 2 36 6 
ir. 2 58 36 



az. 2 14 4 
az. ,2 36 54 

az. 2 36 I 



16 fr. 2 16 48 



J7 az. 2 16 38 
18 

20 az. I 18 34 

ai f. . I 58 

fr. 1 1 9 1 1 

£3] ..z. p 42 5 



rh 



22,3 
2 1,2 

22:4 



22 5 
22,6 



2Z,5 

22. <; 



i3>3 



23,8 

23,2 

24,1 
*3>3 



23 

28 
28 
28- 

28 

S,8 

28 



1. 
0,6 

0,8 

1.2 

1 3 
Ij3 

1 2 



1^4- 



^8 



28 1,6 



1.7 



23,0 



'3>' 



28 



i;4- 



17 



Wind and St.^, c ofthe Weather. 



1 3 



i>4 



S.E. Mod br. fair 

^S.S E. S.E Mod.br. cloudy, 

I (liowtTi or rain ai intervals 
i).E. Mo J. l-.r. cl.Midy 

5 S.E. S.S.E. Light br. br'dk, 

I hazy 

S.E. S.S.E. Mod. br. hazy 
Di to 

^ VV.S.W. S E. GuTsofwiiid, 

i r::iii :i:rcr a'lls very 'air 
E.S.E. Md. br. h'zy, tair 

CE.S.E. E.N.E. Mod. breeae, 

I \lg\n ! r hazy, fair' 

tS.S.h.. S.E. Very light br. 

I Very fine 

D.E. E. Vtry light br. very fair 

.E. E. Very light br. very fair 

i E.S.E. E.N.E. Very light br. 
t very ftiir 

cS-S.E. Mod. br. afterwards 
I c;i'm, very fine 

CN.E. N.W. W. Gufls of 

t wind, fair 

C W.N.W. W. W.S.W.Guffs 

1 of wind, fair, fleet 

j.VV, S.S.V/. S.S.E. Cuds of 

VA ind, cloudy 
S.S.E. V3riable> liitle wind, d. 

^ S.S.E. E. Very little wind, 

2 cloudy, atterwaids ierene 

^S.E. N.N.E. Light br. fair, 

1 atcervvards ra-n 

C S.E. N.E. Variable, light br. 
C clciidy, rai.i 

CE N.E. W.S.W. Li'-'htbr. 

2 c;din, cl. aiterwards clear 

S. E.N.E Vrrylittie wind, clear 
C S E. N.E. LiUL wind, lior- 
l ry, then tair, very variahie 
cN.E. S.V7. b.E. Little wind, 
I hi.fk, lair 

5. S.J.E.Mvd. br. fair 



S3 



Al'?&Nt)i:5L 



^A&LfiS d£ tHE ROUtE OF trfL ftsf fefatf^E. 



Date. 




Latitude 


Latitude Longitude 


Longiiudc 


Viriarioii of th: 


1791. 




South by 


South by 


Lift by 


Lil\ by 


Kecdic Eaft, 






0';f::rvdrion 


Computarion 


Oblervation 


Jomputition 








' " 


' /' 


' /' 


' ' 


f 1, 


Auguft. 


24 
^5 


53 4S 

1 19 36 


d 56 i< 

I 29 3. 


) 128 24 i( 
) 127 45 li 


128 28 J< 
127 41 I J 




iff. 49 53 




26 


I 43 i« 


I 39 4^ 


> 127 26 3^ 


127 2S lr>| do. 28 32 














w.rt. 




»7 


* 59 56 


i 4 16 


127 2 35 


127 13 3i 


do. 26 ? 

Eaft. 




28 


2 S2 34 


a 28 3S 


127 12 6 


127 6 ; 


do. 4 13 




29 


2 28 38 


- 39 15 


127 13 5: 


127 I 4S 


clo. 54 58 




30 


■ 2 39 48 


2 42 38 


127 4. 52 


126 56 54 


. do. I 9 36 




31 


2 40 81 


2 46 11 


126 49 46 


126 42 46 


do. I 4S 38 


September. 


1 


2 46 37 


2 52 47 


126 28 54 


126 24 52 


do. 1 34 10 




•• 


* 52 34 


2 45 38 


126 4 48 


126 8 44 


do. I 8 54 




3 


3 14 6 


2 10 34 


' i25 35 g 


125 48 32 


do. J 19 3 




4 


3 35 46 


3 28 6 


'25 49 3 


125 40 24 





- 


5 
6 


3 43 36 
3 40 39 


3 55 35 


^25 52 15 
126 9 54 


125 2 2S 


i do. 47 29 












At Amboyn 


a. 












Oaober. 


14 


3 48 46 


3 48 3 


125 57 4 


125 55 8 


Weft. 




1*5 


4 29 00 


4 33 43 


125 14 8 


125 36 2 


do, 37 8 
Eafi. • 




16 


5 24 54 


5 26 19 


124 36 g 


124 38 49 


do. 16 00 


. 


57 


6 12 13 


6 26 23 


123 52 6 


124 3 2 


do. 4 19 
Weft. 




18 


7 a 24 


7 4 44 


^23 9 34 


»23 35 9 


do. 34 36 
Eaft. 


- 


'9 


7 25 36 


7 18 24 


123 3. 46 


123 2 46 


do. 29 34 

Weft. 




20 


8 15 27 


8 9 29 


123 29 IC 


123 23 10 


do. 58 54 




21 


8 44. 38 


8 29 36I 


122 56 6 


123 28 36! 


do. 26 3 




22 


9 3 li 


8 56 44 


122 34 8 


122 44 7 


do. 28 56 




33 


9 17 49 


9 8 29 


122 17 12 


122 19 19 


do. I 33 12 




24 


9 18 48 


9 16 19 


121 39 34. 


122 4 8 


ff. 1 48 54 


\ 


25 


9 44 48 


9 22 42 


120 58 46 r 


121 36 47 


it, I 14 11 




26 


lo 6 00 


9 55 37 


120 23 12: 


I20 46 12 


do. 1 17 26 




»7 


10 23 54 


10 14 00 


119 52 14 


120 15 18 


do. 56 34. 




28 


10 42 00 


10 42 47 


118 49 18 


119 19 34 


do. 54 36 




29 


10 50 48 


10 58 38 


it8 7231 


ri8 34 23 


I'r. I 14 48 




30I 


1138 


II 3 00 


117 >9 54 


117 48 28 


ff. I 26 8 



APPENDIX 89 

TABLES OP THE ROUTE OP THE ESPERANCE. 



24 
^5 
26 

27 

28 
29 

30 

3' 

I 
2 
3 
4 
5 

6 

J4 

15 
16 

17 



24 

26 

27 
28 
29 

3t' 



Variation of the 

Needle E.ift, 



fr. I 2 
Weft 



8 8 



Therm. Barometer. 



Ir. 


40 24 
Eaft. 


fr. 
fr. 


22 54 

1 28 34 


fr. 


56 28 


fr. 
fr. 


I 23 54 
I 8 36 




Wtft. 


az. 


I 14 26 






fr. 


Eaft. 
18 44 

Weft. 


fr. 


38 36 




Eaft. 


az. 


24 59 
Weft. 


az. 
fr. 
fr. 


32 56 
26 54 
33 56 


fr. 


24 22 


az. 


I 26 12 


az. 


I 9 11 


fr. 


29 38 



az. o 52 36 



fr. I 56 44 



21,6 
21,1 

21,7 



Wind and State of the Weather. 



1,8 

2,0 



•8 1,7 



22,6 
22,2 



1,2 
2,2 



22,628 

22,oU8 
22)0 I28 
22,0 28 



22,0 



I,S 

1 = 5 
Ij7 
2.1 



28 2,2 



22;4l2! 



1.5 



2,1 




S.S.E. Mod. br. calm, brifk, fair 
CS.S.E. S. Mod. breeze, little 
C wind, fair 

CE. S.E. S. Light br. fair, fome 
I fleet 

S.W. Variable, light br. fair 

E. N. S.E. Variab. light br, fair 
E. N. Var. very little wind, fair' 

CE.N.E. S.E. S.S.W. Very 

t little wind, fair 

I E.N.E. S.S.E. Light breeze, 

i afterwards calm, dark 
S.E. N.R.N. Brifk, light br, fair 
S.S.E. W.N.W. Light br. fair 
S.S.W. E. Light breeze, fair 
S.S.W. S.E.E. Little wind, fair 
S.S.E. E.S.E. Mod. br. hazy 

E, N.E. S.S.E. Light br. hazy 

E.S.E. Light br. fair 

E.S.E. S.S.E. Light br. cloudy 

E.S.E. S.S.E. Mod. br. cloudy 

E.S.E. S.E. Mod. br. cloudy 

: E.S.E. S.S.W. Mod. br. 
'. light br. cloudy 

Calm, E. N.E. light br. cloudy 

E.S.E. E.E. N.E. Light br. cl. 
S.E. N.W. Light br. very fine 
S.S.E. N.N.W. Light br. fog 
S.S.E, N.N.W. Very little 
wind, foggy 

Ditto 

^From S.W. to N.W. Very 

i little wind, foggy 

CW.S.W. S.S.W. Very little 

I wind, foggy 
S.S E. Veiy little wind, foggy 
S.E. Very light br. foggy 
S. E. S. S.E, Light br, ferene 
S.S.E. S.S.W, Light br. ferene 



go APPENDIX. 

TABLES OF THE ROUTE OF THE ESPERANCE. 



Date, 

i79i. 



Oaober. 

November. 



December. 



Latitude 

South ov 

Obfervation. 



V 



9 

10 

II 

12 

13 
14- 
15 
i6 

17 
i8 

'9 

20 
21 

aa 

23 
24 

25 
26 

27 



29 
30 

I 

2 

3 
4 
5 
6 



Latitude 

South by 

Computation. 



ir 24. 16 

11' 4.5 38 

n 14- 54- 
12 35 28 

12 36 33 

13 28 44 

14 58 00 

15 59 00 

16 45 34 

17 15 

17 46 12 

^8 5 

18 7 

18 38 

19 42 34 

20 42 44 

21 26 34 

22 28 38 

23 34 26 

24 42 00 

25 47 38 

26 24 00 



30 4 00 

31 4 47 
30 48 24 

30 48 23 

30 59 37 

31 4 12 

31 24 

32 29 54 

32 56 16 

33 23 54 

34 16 14 
34 10.34 
34 45 36 



38 

39 14 
23 46 



Longitude 

Eaft by 
Obi'ervation. 



11 36 6 
iz 19 33 

12 46 54 

i^ 55 43 

13 28 42 

14 45 33 

15 5 
16 

17 

17 5^ 34 

18 15 26 
18 15-24 

18 38 52 

19 41 34 

20 42 II 

21 46 42 

22 30 46 

23 33 26 

24 49 00 

25 46 54 

26 18 19 

27 18 4 

28 23 6 

29 32 7 

30 44 49 
30 49 36 

30 52 53 

31 2 
31 9 17 

31 24 

32 26 30 

33 8 16 

33 28 19 

34 32 4 
24 26 8 

34 34 36 



117 
116 

"5 

114 
113 
113 

1 12 
1 1 1 
no 
109 
107 
106 
106 
105 
105 
104 
102 

lOI 

lOI 
ICO 

99 
99 
98 



Longitude 

Eali by 

Computation 



Variation of the 
Needle Weft. 



6 38 

19 32 

28 4 
36 12 

48 48 
3 56 

5 28 

29 36 
34 4? 
15 4? 

49 27 
59 34 
26 38 
56 12 
15 24 
26 32 

44 II 

45 34 

6 16 
15 8 
26 34 
36 8 
29 34 



117 19 

116 42 

115 39 
114 52 
114 
113 26 
112 26 
III 39 
no 54 
109 24 



96 56 7 



98 8 46 

99 I i 54 
99 46 

100 26 54 

loi 28 36 
103 14 54 

105 00 t6 

i05 53 14 
108 58 38 

112 2 3 

113 38 56 



54 

34 

6 12 

56 

34 
36 
46 



48 (T. 



108 
107 



106 34 

106 5 

105 22 

104 25 

103 16 

loi 54 

100 58 

100 29 

99 26 

99 28 

98 39 

97 44 

97 36 

97 8 

97 35 



95 14 54 

99 49 54 

100 9 54 

loi 24 32 

103 14 54 

104 2 18 

105 23 34 
108 19 18 
III 36 3 

"3 4 56 



(T. 

do. 

do. 
fr. 
do. 
do. 
do. 

do. 



do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 



48 3S 

34 19 
45 3^ 
36 18 

39 49 

44 36 
52 30 

52 00 
34 26 
18 14 

39 9 

54 16 

26 24 

3 9 

T2 14 

22 36 

38 24 

42 36 

28 17 



do. 8 32 2 

do. 9 36 54 

do. 10 4 9 

do. 9 22 3 

do. 9 38 5+ 

do. 9 38 S3 

do. 9 36 44 

do. 9 36 12 

do. 7 38 14 



APPENDIX. 91 

TABLES OP THE ROUTE OF THE ESPERANCE. 



Date. 

1792. 



Oaober. 

November. 



Decsmber. 



Variation of the 
Needle Weft. 



31 



3 
4 
5 
6 

? 
8 

9 
10 
n 

32 

13 
14 

I <; 
16 

17 
ig 

19 
ao 
21 
22 

23 

24 

^5 
26 



29 



I 23 36 



Therm 



1 28 4.6 
I 6 8 


2 59 49 


1 19 36 

2 59 56 


3 18 14 


3 36 52 


6 23 54 


■ ■■ 


7 46 34 


8 8 12 


8 9 6 


9 58 19 


9 4 7 


8 48 52 


10 26 J 6 


9 38 36 
9 5^ 54 
JO 14 2 





19.4 



19' 



i8,4 



Barometer. 



28 



Wind and State of the Weather. 



28 2,6 



3>i 



28 



19. 



14,2 



J35O 
14,0 



4>i 



a. 3 



h2 



C S.S.W. S.S.E. Moderate br. 
2 rather hazy 
S.S.E. S. Light breeze, hazy 
S.S.E. S.E. Light br. hazy 
S.E. S. Light br. hazy 
S. E. S.E. Very little wind, hazy 
E. E.S.E. Light br. rather hazy 
E. E.S.E. Mod. br.hazy 
|£. S.E.E. Mod. br. hazy 
E.S.E. S. Moderate, fereiie 
S.S.E. S^'S.E, Fine br. very fair 
S.E. S.E. I S. Fine br, cloudy 
Si S.E. S.E.iE.Mod. br. cK 

S.W. S.E. Light br. cloudy. 
ti.S.E. E.S.E. Light br. cloudy 
S.Ei E. S.E. Moderate br. cl. 
S.E. S.S.E. Mod. br. cloudy 
S.S.E. E.S.E. Mod. br. cloudy 
S.E. Fine br. cloudy 
Ditto 

S.E. E.S.E. Violent fqualls, cl. 
S.Ei E. S.E| S. Mod. br, fair 
S. S.E|: S. Mod. br. cloudy, fair 
E.S.E. S.Ei S. Fine br. clondy 
S.E. E.S.E. Mod. br. cloudy 
S.EJ S. El N.E. Mod. br. d. 
V E.N.E. S.S.E. Variable, little 
I wind, cloudy, and feme rain 
C S.S.E. S.W. Little wind, 
i rather cloudy 
C S.S.W. Si S.E. Light breeze, 
I very fine 

CS.S.W.S. S.E.N. Little wi35\!, 
\ very fine 

X N.N. W. W. Little wind, very 
I fine 

W. N.N.W. Moderate, very fine 
CN.W. S.W. Mod. br. fair, 
I afterwards a little rain 
S.W. Light br. very fine 
N.W. S.W. Light br. very fine 
W.N.W. W.S.W. Finebr. hazy 
W.S.W. Fine breeze, hazy 
c W.S.W. W.N.W. fine br. 
i hazy 



92 APPENDIX. 

TABLES OF THE llOUTE OF THE ESPERANCE. 



Date, 

179a. 


Latitude 

Soutli by 

Obfervation. 


Latitude 

South by 

Computation. 


Longitude 

Eaft by 

Obfervation.- 


Longitude 

Eaft by 

Computation 


Variation of the 
Needle Weft. 






/ " 


' " 


t ' /> 


/ '/ 







/ // 


December. 


7 


35 i6 46 


35 a 36 


115 10 14 


114 48 46 








"""' 






8 

9 

10 


34- 48 34 
34 9 36 
34 I ^^ 


34 5^ 45 
34 14 19 
34 9 42 


116 51 28 

118 21 48 

119 26 34 


116 59 24 

117 46 26 

118 54 8 


fr. 


7 
5 
7 


52 36 
47 6 

8 00 


^ 


II 


33 55 16 


33 54 5^ 


119 32 19 


118 56 34 


do. 


' 6 


i§^ 18 


At the Bay 
Legrand 


of 

J8 
19 

zo 


34 ^2 54 
34 16 18 

34 26 16 

35 12 00 

35 4 34 


34 i^ 54 
34 J 8 49 

34 32 16 

35 9 ^8 

34 59 14 


119 21 30 
119 30 14 
119 33 6 


3i8 49 36 
119 8 45 
119 4 4 
119 35 2 
119 28 36 


"do. 
do. 


5 
6 


36 52 
4 16 




2Z 


119 54 36 


do. 


5 


19 34 




as 


34 ^4 53 


34 28 54 


120 22 36 


120 3 38 
















24. 


34 13 42 


34 14 42 


123 1 3 


120 55 2 


do. 


5 


8 2 




25 
26 


33 40 46 
33 3 58 


33 48 46 
33 J2 54 


322 4 8 

122 35 7 


3 22 84 
122 35 38 


do. 
do. 


4 

4 


58 00 
18 3 




27 


32 33 19 


3^ 3^ 34 


123 23 46 


123 16 44 














, 


28 


32 17 5a 


32 a4 38 


124 52 16 


324 45 16 


do. 


4 


8 58 




S9 


31 59 00 


32 4 36 


X26 4 7 


125 58 14 


do. 


3 


58 19 




30 


32 16 40 


32 9 18 


126 39 46 


126 48 46 
















31 


32 9 34 


32 5 4 


127 2 38 


127 4 14 


do. 


a 


58 3 


January, 
1793. 


a 


31 53 8 
31 47 4 


31 S9 17 
31 48 19 


127 20 54 
127 58 46 


127 29 52 
127 58 54 


fr. 
,do. 


a 

3 


47 38 
38 44 




3 


3T 42 00 


31 44 52 


128 54 32 


128 53 36 


do. 


3 


39 a8 




4 
5 
6 

7 
8 

9 


31 52 00 

32 52 46 

34 28 54 

35 31 48 

36 33 32 

37 00 8 


31 55 44 

32 59 15 

34 24 52 

35 32 46 

36 16 12 
36 48 34 


129 9 48 

128 8 4 
127 44 52 
127 18 54 
126 22 2 


129 34 42 
128 18 36 
128 6 54 
127 38 8 
326 46 58 
127 12 16 


do. 

do: 

do. 


I 

2 

3 
a 


49 2 
16 39 
38 6 

14 6 












30 


37 16 36 


37 36 48 


128 34 44 


128 45 19 


fr. 


3 


28 7 




■II 


37 12 34 


37 34' 36 


329 6 54 


129 8 54 


do. 


2 


48 36 




32 


37 36 15 


37 38 34 


129 38 36 


129 28 34 


fl". 


2 


6 19 




13 
14 


38 S3 16 

39 18 24 


38 44 16 

39 28 46 


131 32 54 
131 56 8 


131 34 5: 

132 4 36 


do. 


I 


29 54 










15 


40 iS 3S 


40 9 00 


132 az 28 


332 32 58 









APPENDIX. 93 

TABLES OP THE ROUTE OF THE ESPERANCE. 



27 



Variation of the 
Needle Weft. Therm. 



9 8 44 

8 18 29 
8 19 16 
6 49 1 8 

5 4^ 52 



az. 5 58 54 
az.i 6 34 I 



a; 5 36 

32. 5 18 

az. 4 5 

az. 4 34 

ff. 3 36 

az. 2 42 

az. 2 58 

az. 2 36 

az. 2 19 

az. 2 53 

az. 2 17 



az. I 24 

az. o 34 

az. o 36 

az. 2. 28 



^7.. 3 37 

az. 2 47 

az. I 58 

az. I 48 

Eart. 
fr. o 16 



14,0 

14 2 

13-5 
14,0 

14,2 



15.5 



'5>2 
16,0 
15,6 
15,0 

15,0 



Barom. 



p. I. 

28 2,5 

28 1,8 

28 2,7 

28 0,5 

28 2,4 



28 3,0 
28 3,0 



28 1,5 

28 1,5 

28 0,5 

27 11,9 

28 2,3 
8 1,0 

18 0,3 



16,0 
16,0 

16,9 

17,0 

i7>o 

15,0 
14,5 



13,4 



13.0 



28 3,0 

8 2,0 

8 0:0 

28 1,8 

28 0>I 

iS 1,0 

^-8 4,2 

i8 5,0 



28 



3.0 



2>3 



I J, 4 



Wind and State of the Weather. 



5 W.N.W. W.S.W. A fmart 

I gale, rain, afterwards fair 
W.N.W. Mod. br. cloudy 
W.S.W. Finehr. mod. br. ferene 
W. W.S.W. Moderate br. hazy 

fV/.S.W. S.W. Smart gale, 

I brifk, cloudy 



E. E.N.E. Mod. br. fair 

E. S. Mud. br. fair 

S.E. S.S.W Light br. fair, hazy ' 

S.S.E.E. E.N.E. Mod.br. cL 

CE. S. Brifk, then very little 

i wind, fair 
S.E. E. Mod. br. cloudy, foggy 

5E.S.E. N.E. N.W. S.W. 

i Biifk, foggy, afterwards clear 
S.W. W.S.W. Smart gale fair 
E. E.S.E. Mod. br. fair 

5 E.S.E. S.S.E. S.S.W. Mod. 

I br. hazy 

5 S.S.W. Very brilk, after- 

\ wards little wind, hazy 

C S. E. N. W. S.W. Light br. 

\ very fine 

E. E.N.E. Fine breeze, very fair 

< E. E.N.E. Mod. br. light br. 

\ very fine 

cE. N. W.S.V/. Light br. 

I ftorniy, afterwards foggy 
W. N. E. Little wind,ltormy,fog 

5 S.E, E. N.E. Pretty brilk, 

I tempeltuous, afterwards foggy 
S.E.S.Mod br. temp, then foggy 
S.S.E. E.S.E. Mod. br. hazV 
E . S . E. E . E . N .E . Mod . br. hazy 
Ei N.E. S.E. Pretty briik, hazy 
S.E.E. Light br. cloudy ~ 
E. N. W. S.W. Little wind, cl. 

.; W. S. W. S. S.S.E. Light' 

I br. a little rain, then fair 
S.S.E. Little wind, then ca. fair 

5 S.E. E.N.E. Very little wind, 

1 light br. fair 

N.E. N. N.W. Brifk, little w. fair 
N.W. S. W. S.E. iMod. br. hazy 



5 E.S.E. N.W. Light br. then 
^'^ \\ calm, brilk, hazy, fleet 



94 



APPENDIX. 



TABLES OF THS ROUTE OF THE ESPERANCE. 



Date, 

■ ■i793- 


Latitude 

South by 

Obfcrvation. 


Latitude 

South by 

Computation. 


Longitude 

Eall by 

Oufervation. 


Longitude 

Eall by 

Computation. 


VariatJosi of the 
Needle Eaft. 


\ 




' >> 


' 1' 


/ '/ 


' /' 




' " 


Janitary. 


-1 6 


40 58, 34 


41 12 4 


135 4 18 


J35 18 34 










17 


4-1 39 37 


41 48 19 


137 44 37 


'37 38 17 


fr. 


3 54 37 




18 
J9 


42' 3,8 52 
42 51 -19 


42 52 36 
4^ 56 5?- 


141 6 46 

142 49 i8 


141 8 56 

142 32 46 
















2C 


43 22 34 


43 28 24 


143 29 6 


143 14 4 


ff. 


6 53 4 




SI 


. 43 44 48 


43 4S 36 


144 16 52 


144 2 6 












22 


43 3S 1 




144 46, 3, 




fr. 


7 24 5^ 








At Pieman' 
Land. 
Febriiaiy. 
March,. 


5 

28 
I 

a 


43 22 2S 

-42 56 52 

42 32 34 






145 40 00 

147 55 8 
151 13 8 


Ir. 




4^ 59 4 
42 25 8 


T47 57 6 
151 I 8 


6 4 32 
9 16 8 




3 


42 21 38 


42 12 49 


153 14 16 


153 21 38 


ff, 


10 44 46 




4 
5 
6 


42 10 54 
; 40 23 8 


42 24 
41 42 8 

4Q 2 I 54 


15 1 s 


155 42 3.6 
157 35 8 
159 26 4 


ft-. 


11 38 00 
















7 
8 

9 


i, 3.9 2.7 19 

\ 37 S3 43 
1 36 24 36 


39, ,26 28 

37 44 46 
36 28 56 


161 7 53 
163 33 56 
165 48 19 


160 38 2 

163 27 26 
165 35 19 


fr. 


13 8 00 












3 


35 36 li 


35 43 3 


166 52 59 


166 43 19 


fT. 


13 19 00 




n 

12 
13 
14 


34 26 18 

; 34 23 36 

, 34 7 46 

33 15 54 


34 22 29 
34 12 26 
34 '2 36 

33 5 54 


168 35 s^ 

170 18 32 

171 54 26 
174 13 52 


168 17 56 

170 2 34 

171 26 34 

174 8 38 


ff. 


12 48 54 












'5 

16 


32 38 44 


32 28 52 
31 41 32 


176 26 14 
178 34 53 


176 12 17 
178 29 34 

V 


ff. 


II 23 23 




31 55 19 








17 


30 19 17 


30 18 27 


179 49 27 


179 42 24 


ff. 


II 46 4 




j8 


29 34 36 


29 22 36 


J 79 54 26 
Weft. 


Weft. 
179 59 28 


fr. 


II 49 34 




19 


28 T 8 49 


28 28 18 


179 9 19 


179 18 36 


fT. 


10 56 54 




20 




27 9 4 
25 53 36 


178 7 14 
176 18 4 


178 38 44 

178 32 46 
176 5 3 


ft". 


11 17 36 




25 58 36 

24 19 26 




21 








22 


24 9 34 






' 


23 


22 8 39 


22 9 48 


176 26 7 


176 aa 8 


IT. 


9 48 16 



APPENDIX. gs 

TABLES OP THE ROUTE OP THE ESPERANCE. 



Date, Variation of ihc 

1793. Needle Eatt 



January. 1 6 



Febraary. 
March o 



17 

19 

20 az. 

21 az. 

22 fr. 



28 



34 5? 

1 52 14 

8 9 17 

7 5» 56 
€ 13 19 



Therm, 



az. 7 28 z8 



37. 9 17 00 

fr. 12 44. 00 



4- 
5 


az. 


12 38 00 






6 







7 


az. 


J 3 19 00 


9 


az. 


13 4.4. 00 


10 


az. 


12 46 19 


11 
12 

»3 


az. 


12 59 00 






14 


az. 


n 43 56 


'^.5 


az. 


10 49 26 


16 






'7 


az. 


10 36 26 


18 


az. 


10 44 30 


J9 


fr. 


10 13 19 


20 

21 

22 


fr. 


10 33 46 






asj 


az. 


8 4/5 54 



10,3 

12,5 

12,7 



14,0 



14,4 



15. 1 



16,1 
17,2 



16,8 



17,0 



i8,6 



Barometer, 



Wind and State of the V/esther. 



28 



z8 



i»4 
3)0 



2,4 



5 W.S. W. W. W.N. W. Mod. 

I br. hazy. 

W. W.N.W. Mod. br. haxy, 

a little rain 

N.W. W. S.W. Flnebr.ha. fleet 

S.W.S.S.W.S.Finebr.hazyjfleet 

5 S.W. Mod. br. afterwards 

I calm. W. S.W. Briik, ha. fair 

N.W. Bri(k, then calm. W. 

Li gilt br. fair 
E. N. Little wind, mod, br, 
very fine 



23 1,6 



28 



0,2 

0,2 



28 



S.S.W. Mod. breeze, hazy, fair 
0,4 JN.N.W. Mo.br. light br.veryfair 
N.W. W. S.W. Fine br. ha. fair 
W.S.W. N.N.W. Light br. 
mod. br. fair 
N.N.W. Fine breeze, hazy 
N.N.W. N.W. Fine br. cl. fo?. 

( W.S.W. S.S.W. S.S.E. Fine 

i breeze, fos:2;y 
S.S.E. S.V/. W. Mod.br. dark 
N. W. W. 8- W. Fine br. cloudy 
S.S.E. S.S.W. Mod. hr. fair 

SS. W.N.W. Light br. mod. 

I br. very fine 
W. W.N.W. Mod. br. very fine 

W. W.N.W, Mod, br. fo^ray 

W.N.W. Light br. foggy "^ 
N.W. Mod, br. fog2;y 
C N.W. N.N.W. Light breezev 
I mod. breeze, fosjgy 
r N.W. IN. S. W.^Smart gale* 
1 mod. br. fome rain 
C W.S.W. S.W. S, S.W. Mod. 
C br. hazy 

S.S.E. S, S.S.W, Light br.haty 

^S. S.S E. S.E. E.S.E. Light 
C br. fair, rather hazy 
f S.E. E.S.E. E.E.iN.E. Lt. 
i br, fair, afterwards cl. rain 
5N.E. N.W. Light br. mod. 
I br, cloudy, rain, then fair 
S.S.W. S. Fiiiebr. hazy, fair 
f S.S.E. S,E. E.S.E. Mod. bf. 
i rather hizy, fair 



3>5 



95 



APPENDIX. 



TABLES OF THE ROUTE OF THE ESPERANCS. 



Date, 
1793- 



Cal-edonia. 
May. 



24 



March. 
At Tongata 
boo. 
April. I o 



14 
16 

18 

19 

20 



June. 



I 

17 
18 

»9 



22 

33 
24 

as 
26 

.27 
28 



Latitude 

South by 

Oblcivation. 



2055 23 
20 12 38 



19 37 50 
19 52 16 

19 53 8 



Latitude 

South by 

Computation 



J-orgituje I 1-ongitude 

V\'ell by Weil by 

Obfcrvation. [Computaiion, 



20 


22 


35 


20 


9 


B''^ 


20 


16 


46 


20 


10 


48 


19 


50 


24 


18 


53 


33 


18 


31 


13 


17 


38 


59 


16 


3J? 


00 


14- 


42 


59 


IZ 


55 


54 


II 


3S 


17 


II 


15 


4R 


10 


55 


54 


10 


39 


38 


10 


3» 


25 


10 


48 


19 


10 


53 


42 


10 


33 


10 


9 


53 


34 


9 


58 


56 


10 


7 


16 












/ 


// 


21 


10 


32 


20 


52 


23 


■io 


18 


54 


20 


16 


6 


20 


8 


16 


20 


9 


.4 


20 


9 


34 


20 


15 


2 


20 


28 


54 


20 


39 


?6 


20 


16 


56 









177 26 40 
179 34 40 



Eaih 
172 4 2 
169 43 10 

167 54 30 

165 4^ 19 
162 55 4 
161 58 53 



20 12 3S 
19 54 i4 

19 13 6 

18 38 54 
17 56 29 
16 38 56 

14 47 54 

13 52 li 

12 58 44 

II 39 54 
II 12 39 

10 56 49 

10 47 17 
10 36 34 
10 32 54 

10 5S 36 

11 , 8 47 
10 58 34 

ID 18 47 

9 58 54 
ip 12 52 
10 32 56 
10 12 18 



Variation of the 

Needle Er.lL 



177 i6 9 ff. 9 44 17 



162 


15 


18 


162 


2 


52 


161 


25 


12 


161 

i6i 


6 
6 


26 
55 


163 


4 


15 


162 


39 


15 


163 


13 


52 


163 


32 


25 


163 


39 


3' 


163 
163 


32 
21 


35 
10 






160 

159 
158 


J7 
40 

57 


35 

30 

5 


159 


7 


40 


158 
158 


45 


50 
"6 


J 





177 25 56 

179 42 24 

Ealh 

177 45 46 

175 37 16 

172 48 33 

169 48 16 

167 44 18 

165 58 i6 

163 9 z 

162 4 53 



102 33 46 
162 36 49 

161 42 54 

161 38 8 

161 34 6 

162 14 36 

163 18 34 

163 24 36 

163 14 46 
163 38 54 
163 39 37 

163 52 14 

163 45 54 
163 48 34 
J63 34 46 
»62 14 6 

160 52- 34 

159 43 17 
158 52 8 

158 54 56 

159 4 50 
158 3 56 
157 52 26 



do. 



9 14 00 



do. 9 47 14 
do. n 26 14 
do, II 16 19 



ir. II 19 4 
00, 8 34 10 



fl'. 



9 44 5' 



do. 8 38 56 

do. 10 4 32 
do. 9 32 24 
fr. 9 58 36. 



do. 9 54 36 



do. 

ir. 



9 43 40 
2 18 46 



do. 10 12 16 



fr. 



9 14 45 



do. 9 45 36 
do, 8 54 la 



APPENDIX. gr 

TABLES OP THE ROUTE OP THE ESPERANCE. 



Variation of the 
Needle Eaft. 



az. 9 46 36 



az. 9 16 54 



9 ^4- 5^ 
9 4.6 12 



9 38 16 

9 14 36 

10 12 54. 

9 ^5 ^6 

az- 9 44- 5+ 



fr. 

fr. 

fr. 
fr. 



9 24. 14 
9 36 16 



az. 9 36 16 



9 42 17 
8 49 36 
7 54- 36 



8 52 18 



Therm 



20,8 



20,7 



20,0 
2.0,3 
20,4 

20.1 



10,4 



20,7 



23,0 

22,5 
23,0 
22,0 
22,0 
22.5 
22,8 
22,6 

22,5 

22,2 

22)0 
22, f 



Barometer. 



3.2 



2,7 



28 



2>3 



28 1,2 



28 2,0 
28 2,2 
28 2,5 



28 



^.3 



28 2,6 



28 



28 



3>5 
2,4 



1,0 

i.o 
0,0 
0,8 
I.I 

0.5 
0.2 
0,2 

0,5 

»,^ 
1,0 

D>6 



Wind and State of the Weather. 



M.E. S.E. Mod. br. hazy, fair 



E. E.S.E. Mod. br. hazy, fair 
E, Fine br. hazy, fair 

E. E.S.E. Fine br. hazy, fair 
E.S.E. Fine br. cloudy, fomerain 

E. E. S.E. Fine br.cl. then ferene 
E. Ei S.E. Mod. br. ha7y, fair 
fEi S.E. S.E.i E. Mod. br. 
1 hazy, fair 

5.E. Mod. hr. afterw. finebr.fair 
E.S.E. E. Fine breeze, cloudy 
Ditto 
Ditto 

E.S.E. S.SE. light br. fair 
f NE. S.E. Variable, very little 
i wind, fair 

CS.S.E. Light br. afterwards 
I fmart gale, fair 
S.E. Very litt'e wind, fair 
S.E. Littlewind, then light br.fair 
E.S.E. Bvilk, thtn fine br, hazy 
E.S.E. Fine breeze, hazy 
C S.E.E. N.E. Gutts of wind, 
I tcmpeltuous, cloudy, rain 
f E.N.E. E. E.S.E. Mod. br. 
X hazy, afterwards fertne 
E. E. S.E. Mod.br. hazy 
C E.S.E. N.E. N.W. Little w. 
I tempeftuoiis, rain, aft. ferene 
C E. N. S.E, Little wind, fair, 
I fome rain, fair 
E.S.E. N.E. N. Little w. hazy 
i,. S.E. Little wind', hazy 
^S.Ei Light breeze, hazy, rain 
R. Fine br. cloudy,-rain \ 

E.S.E. Fine breeze^ hazy 
\L. Fine breeze, hazy 
E. Fine breeze, hazy 
^ E. Mod. hr. afterwards calm, 
l|i W. little wind, hazy 
W. Squally, hazy, fleet, rain 
■N. N.E. E.NE. Light br. hazy 
E.N.E. Mod. br. hazy 



g[S APPENDIX. 

TABLES OP THE ROUTE OP THE ESPERANCE* 



Date. 

1793- 



June. 



July. 



9 

JO 

J I 

12 

13 

H 

15 
i6 

17 
J8 

'9 
ai 

22 
»3 

24 
25 

a6 

27 

28 

29 



Latitude 

South by 

Obfervation. 



3 6 



9 27 43 

9 6 39 

8 56 54 

8 49 56 

9 18 45 

10 8 19 

11 29 54. 
II 6 46 
II 00 00 
II 14 34 

10 58 32 

10 36 32 

10 24 29 

10 12 56 

9 54 39 



9 42 44 

9 46 6 

8 53 29 
8 14 48 

8 16 9 

8 16 38 
8 8 17 
7 36 38 

6 54 42 



7 8 48 

7 8 43 

5 39 36 

5 15 16 

49 56 

47 ^4 

4 38 

51 14 

38 36 



4 42 ]8 
4 22 44 
3 46 39 
3 13 36 

2 42 54 



Latitude 

South by 

Computation 



9 52 ^4 

9 59 4 

9 32- 14 

9 ^■^ 37 

9 2 34 

8 48 16 

9 14 46 

10 4 

11 9 36 
II 24 52 
II 43 36 
II i6 38 

II 18 14 

10 38 6 

10 39 47 
IP 12 56 

4 59 

55 24 
52 36, 



10 



9 6 34. 
8 36 54 
8 26 46 

8 28 9 

8 tS 42 

7 41 37 

7 3^ 18 



7 13 44 
6 

5 

5 

4 

4 51 34 

4 54 



25 14 
18 36 

J2 58 

47 36 



4 42 8 
4 38 36 

4 i^ 54 
3 48 18 

3 16 34 

a 52 33 



Longitude 

Eaftby 
Oblervation. 



158 7 32 



57 15 10 
56 35 45 



55 9 

55 12 30 

54 49 5 

54 37 42 

53 33 15 

52 14 50 

51 54 *5 
'51 18 32 

50 18 35 

52 20 10 

49 42- 36 
4^ 14 22 

49 7 55 

49 2* 30 
49 18 24 
48 59 40 

48 17 15 

47 22 54 
46 37 25 

46 13 44 
45 31 35 
45 47 10 



51 45 
26 20 

31 55 
15 30 
53 36 
57 40 
36 15 
55 50 



49 9 -5 



19 34 
18 35 
49 10 



Longitude 

Eaft by 

Coniputation 



47 a 46 



57 53 

57 36 

55 44 

56 54 
55 56 
55 33 



36 



55 12 i^ 



54 49 
54 38 
53 44 
52 28 
5^ 5 



51 29 37 



51 4 

50 19 
49 56 
49 13 



49 8 34 



49 i^ 
49 8 
49 8 



48 24 42 



47 33 
46 47 
46 19 



45 33 3*^ 
45 45 ^9 

45 36 34 

45 56 37 

46 54 58 

47 12 18 

47 48 56 

48 9 52 
48 28 19 
48 43 36 

48 54 19 
6 18 
8 36 

17 



49 
49 8 
49 43 



47 59 6 



Variation of the 
Needle Eaft. 



ff. 8 00 00 



do. 
do. 
do. 

do. 

do. 
do. 
do. 



8 12 47 
8 14 18 

8 38 54 



7 48 35 

7 19 36 

7 14 3<S 
7 26 44 

7 34 5* 
7 -8 19 

7 36 44 

6 54 48 

7 38 44 



fr. 6 34 00 



do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 

do. 

do. 
do. 
do. 



6 42 46 
6 38 44 

6 14 55 
6 42 38 
6 37 36 
6 8 36 

6 22 54 

6 42 34 

6 34 3 
6 38 44 



APPENDIX yg 

CABLES GP THE ROUTE OF THE ESPERANGB. 




Wind and State of the Weather. 



From S. to E. light br. cl. rain 
CFrom S. to E. Gufts ct wind, 
I light br. cloudy, ftoimy 
E.S.E. Mod. br. hazy 
S.E. Fine breeze, hazy 
S.E. Fine br. haiy, rain, fleet 
Ditto 

V S.E.N.E.N.W.S.W.S.Light 
1 br. hazy, raia, afterwards fair 
S.E. E.S.E. Mod. br. hazy, rain 
E. E.N.E. Lt. br. fair, rain, fleet 
S.E.S.W. Lt.br. fair, rain, fleet 
S.E. Light br. fair, fome fleet 
S.E. Light br. fair, then rain 
f E.S.E. S.S.E. Light br. fair, 
t afterwards rain 
S.E. Light br. fair 
E.S.E. S.E. Light br. fair 
S.E. S.S.E. Light br. fair 
S.E. S.S.E. Light br. very fair 
C E.S.E. Little wind, afterwards 

1 calm, very fine 
Ditto 

S.E. Mod. br. very fine 
S.E. S.S.E. Mod. br. very fine 

C S.S.E. S.E. Gulfs of wind, 

2 fleet, hazy, rain 
S.E. Mod, br. hazy 
S.E. Mod.br. then light br, hazy 
S.E. Light br. hazy 

c E.S.E. S.E. Light br. then 

t fine br. ileet, rain 

CW.N.W. N.W. Light br. 

i hazy, fleet, rain 

5 S. S.S.E. Light br. hazy, rain, 

I then fair 

S. S.S.E. Mo.br. then finebr.Iia. 
'S.S.E. Mod. br. var. then ca. fine 
S.E. E.S.E. Mod. br. fair 
S. S.E. Brifkj very little w. fair 
Calm, S, light br. fair 
Ditto 
S.E. Stormy, light br. fair 

5 N.W. Light br. then calm., 

I cl. flormy, rain, then lerene 
S.S.E. Light br. fair 
Ditto 
Ditto 

5 S.E. Light br. fqually, hazy, 

Z rain, then fair 



100 APPENDIX. 

TABLES OF THE ROUTE OP THE ESPERANCE. 



Date, 
1793. 


Latitude 

South by 

Obfervation. 


Latitude 

South by 

Computation. 


Longitude 

Eaft by 

Obfervation. 


Longitude 

Eart by 

Computation. 


Variation of the 
Needle Eaft. 






/ " 


' // 


' " 


' " 




of" 


July. 


J2 

13 


2 31 36 


2 38 14 

2 12 47 
I 12 j8 

52 48 
49 18 


147 4 zp 
146 30 55 

145 42 3c 
144 5 6 
144 35 40 


147 5 48 
146 24 54 

145 54 48 
145 3 43 
144 26 38 


fr. 


6 17 54 




2 9 49 

I 5 36 
6 53 39 
52 18 








14 
16 














17 
18 


36 54 
39 lO 


33 14 
26 8 


144 5 15 
143 23 52 


143 54 li 
143 7 Sf> 


do. 


5 24 18 


. 


19 




31 19 




142 46 48 


(T. 


4 54 37 








20 
21 
22 

23 


38 54 
4a 18 

43 34 
14 18 
North. 


22 26 
27 44 
26 39 
13 24 
North. 


143 9 26 
143 a 12 
142 53 36 
142 25 35 


142 38 46 
142 39 36 
142 26 16 
142 4 12 


fr. 
fl-. 
fr. 
ff. 


4 18 19 

3 38 19 

4 18 17 

4 32 54 




24 


2 34 
South. 


I 43 


141 22 45 


141 13 46 


fr. 


4 54 18 


t 


•a5 


8 39 


1 38 
South. 


140 36 ac 


140 28 38 


ff. 


4 18 47 




26 


0126 

North. 


7 46 
North. 


139 12 50 


139 54 32 


fr. 


4 18 00 




«7 
»8 

29 
30 
31 

I 
2 
3 
4 


8 54 

2Z 14 

South. / 
8 58 
8 14 


3 58 
16 36 
South. 

5 54 
14 4z 
23 6 
25 47 
8 24 

5 41 

15 36 


139 32 30 
139 14 51 

138 9 40 

138 43 15 

^35 56 50 
134 51 25 
134 30 00 


138 59 8 
138 34 36 

138 38 7 
138 8 34 
137 19 17 

135 14 19 
134 38 12 
134 9 46 
133 56 34 


fr. 
ff. 
do. 

do. 
do. 
fr. 


4 17 18 




3 4 36 
3 22 37 
3 38 19 

2 28 00 
2 48 9 
2 44 36 


Anguft. 


8 46 

5 34 
5 42 








5 
6 


■■■■"-■" 


9 18 
6 34 
I 38 




133 44 52 


ff. 


a 38 16 








13 23 
North. 

18 34 




133 22 1 2 

132 2 8 








7 


132 30 20 








3 
9 


18 58 
9 26 


North. 

15 37 
South. 

3 5 


132 36 55 
131 56 30 


igz 4 36 

131 38 34 
131 4 36 
130 38 24 


do. 
do. 


1 36 44 

2 38 14 




ro 


033 


5 10 
8 29 


131 ^5 5 








1 1 


1 32 








* 


12 


15 5* 


5 18 


129 18 5 


130 12 14 


fr. 


I 44 xS 



APPENDIX. 101 

TABLES OP, THE EOUTE OP THE ESPERANCE. 



Variation of the 
Needle Eaft. 



Therm. 





' 1' 






az. 


5 4^ oo 






az. 


4 37 oo 



az. 4- 38 00 
az. 3 59 00 
fr. 4 14. 00 



fr. 4 8 



az. 3 33 00 



az. 2184! 
az. 2 24 5! 



az. 2 49 36 



az. I J9 46 



^3,2 

13,2 



22,8 
^3>4 



25,6 
22,8 



24,1 



23,8 



H.o 



23»7 
23,2 

24,2 



21,9 



Barometer. 



p. 1. 



28 0,6 
28 0,9 



28 1,0 
28 0,7 



'.% 0,9 
^8 1,1 



28 1,3 



2S 1,4 



25 1,2 



28 1,3 



^% 0,6 



28 0,9 



Wind and State of the Weatlicr. 



fE. S.S.E. Gufts of wind, 

t hazy, rain, then fine 

5 S.E. Gults, light br. hazy, 

\ rain, then fair 
S.E. Gufts, light br. hazy 
E. Very light br. hazy 

CN. N.V/. S.S.E. Light br, 

\ hazy, rain, cloudy 
Ditto 
E. N. Gufts, hazy, rain, cloudy 

fS.E. E. N. N.W. Gufts, 

\ hazy, rain, cloudy 
W. S. S.E. Very little wind, hazy 
S. S.E. Little wind, very fine 
Ditto 
E.S.E. Light br. very fine 

Ditto 

E. E.N.E. Light br. haiy 

E. S.E. Little wind, ftormy 

E. S. Gufts of wind, ftormy 
S. W.N.W. Guits, fleet, rain 

W. S.W. Mod. br. hazy 
S. E. Little wind, mod. br. hazy 
S. E. N. Gufts, cloudy, rain 
5. S.E. E. Mod. br. hazy 
E. N. Light br. then calm, hazy 
N. W. S.W. N. Little wind, fair 
W. W.S.W. Light br.hazy,rain 
CW.S.W. W.N.W. Light br. 
1 hazy, rain 

W. S. W. S. Light br. hazy, rain 

C S. S.W. Fine br. light br, 
\ hazy, rain 

S.W. S.S.E. Bi ilk gale, fair 

ii. S. Light br. hazy 

CS. S.W. W.S.W. Light br. 

\ then fine br. rain 
W.S.W. S. S.E. Light br. rain 

CS. S.W. S.S.E. Light br. 

t hazy, fair 



I0:i 



APPENDIX. 



TABLES OP THS route OF THE ESPERAlSrCE. 



Date, 

1793- 



Latitude 
North by 
)bfcrvatJon. 



Auguft: 



At Waygiou. 



September. 



AtBourou. 



13 

j6 
28 

30 
31 



^3 
*5 



In the Strait 
of Bouton. 



Oaober. 



Latitude 

North by 

Computation. 



o 12 39 
South 

o 2 36 
North 

o I 27 



o 3 44- 
South, 

o 6 56 

o 33 38 

56 16 

1 38 29 

2 14. 42 

2 4S 43 

3 i8 24 



2 48 54 

2 51 52 

3 28 00 

3 28 46 

4 14 37 
4 18 14 

4 18 56 

4 22 4 



4 3^ 38 



4 38 34 

4 36 3^' 

4 38 36 

4 43 14 

4 47 22 



Longitude 

£..(1 by 

Obfervaiion. 



064 

o 00 49, 

O 00 36 
South 

o 00 39 



o 14 16 
o 38 19 

58 14 

1 29 37 

2 3 42 

2 38 00 

3 8 32 



346 

2 58 32 

3 25 36 

3 33 3 

4 8 36 
4 28 34 

4 32 46 
4 28 16 



129 48 2 
129 34 3 



Longitudfe 

Eaft by 

Computation. 



Variation of the 
Needle Eaft. 



129 15 2 

128 33 8 
127 24 16 
127 14 6 
127 2 36 
126 28 36 



125 46 
125 22 



124 52 16 
124 8 36 

122 54 

123 19 43 

122 36 48 
122 3 16 

121 38 46 

121 8 16 



129 32 16 
129 26 j6 

129 8 19 

129 2 4 

129 14 54 

128 37 44 

127 52 16 

127 16 19 

127 8 4 

126 52 24 

126 14 
125 48 4 



124 54 16 
124 42 36 



ff. I 18 39 

fl'. I 48 36 

(T. I 38 44 

ff. o 44 48 



fT. 



8 7 



iT. o 44 12 

fr. o 34 18 

ff. o 46 8 

Wett. 

fr. o 8 48 

ff. o 8 44 



120 46 2 



122 
122 


48 34 

8 26 


121 


32 46 


121 


18 16 











fr. 
ff. 

ff. 
ff 

.''r. 
ff. 

ff. 



I 36 18 
o 17 42 

Eait. 
o 13 19 
o 36 38 

Welt, 
o 4 38 
o 43 48 

o 41 39 



ff. o 34 42 



120 59 4 



fr. 





46 


35 


ff 





26 


18 


fr. 





46 


54 



APPENDIX. 

TABLES OP THE ROUTE OF THE ESPEE4NQE. 



103 



Date, 
1793- 



Auguft. 



September. 



Oclober. 



13 

16 

28 

29 
30 

3^ 



Variation of the 
Needle Eaft 



az,, o 24. I 



az. o 48 14. 
az. o 14 4 



Weft, 
az. o 6 44 



o 18 44 

Eaft. 

o 18 47 
o 22 10 

Weft, 

o 18 36 

o 12 16 



az. o 16 36 



az. o 6 29 

az. o 48 3^ 
az. o 34 53 



Therm. I Barom. Wind and State of the Weather. 



22,4 

22=3 



21,9 



22,6 



22,4 



22,5 



22;! 

22,3 



22,0 
22,4 



22,6 



22,8 



22,7 
22.5 
22,7 
23,0 



p. 1. 
28 1,3 
28 06 



2S 1,0 



28 1,1 

8 1,4 



28 



1.3 



8 1,6 



2.Z 



28 



I;7 



1.5 
2,0 

1.7 
0.7 



28 



z8 



1,6 

1.7 
1.3 
1.5 



S.W. S.E. Little wind, rain 
S.W. S.E. Little wind, cloudy 

N.W. W. Gufts of wind, 
i light br. rain 

S.W. Gufts, fair 



S.W. Light breeze, hazy 

S. S.S.E. Fine br. hazy 
S. S.S.E. Mod. br. hazy 
S. S.S.E. Lis;htbr. hazy 
S. S.S.E. Mod br. h.tzy 
S.E. W. Light br. hazy 

E.S. Light br. then calm, hazy 
S.E. Mod. br. hazy 



E.S.E. Mod. br. then calm, fair 
E.S.E. Very little wind, fair 

S S E. Mod. br. fair 
Ditto 

S.SE. S.E. Mod.br. fair 
S.S.E Light breeze, fair 

f S.S.E. E.S.E. Very little 

I wind, fair 
S. 8. S.W. Very little wind, fair 

C From N. to E. Gufts of wind, 

I inh- 

CFrom E.S.E. to W.S.W. 

i Moderate br. fair 



S.E. Mod. br, fair 

E.S. E.N.E. Mod. br, fair 

E. Lioht br. fair 



104 APPENDIX. 

TABLES OF THE ROUTE OF THE ESPERANCE. 



Date, 

1793- 


Latitude 

South by 

Obfervation. 


Latitude 

South by 

[Computation. 


Longitude 

Eaft by 

Obfervation. 


Longitude 

Eart by 

Computation. 


Variation of the 
NeedleWel^. 


Oflober, 


3 
4 
5 
6 

7 
S 

9 

lO 

11 

12 

J3 

14 

15 
j6 
17 
18 


' " 


' " 


' '1 


' '1 


fT. 
do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do, 
do. 
do. 
do. 
fr. 

do. 
do. 
do. 





/ /' 














c 




34 10 
38 7 
j8 37 
29 44 












5 ^8 4 
■ 5 47 56 

5 45 43 

6 5 34 
6 16 38 
5 53 36 

5 44 5* 

6 18 34 
6 52 36 
6 52 16 

6 55 4 
6 56 44 
6 58 00 




120 44 8 

"9 38 34 
118 43 56 
117 25 14 

116 2 36 
114 54 16 
113 42 34 
112 45 34 
III 56 5^- 

111 28 12 

110 59 54 
no 48 46 
no 54 38 


119 42 38 
n8 46 38 
117 32 7 

"6 4 35 

114 53 38 
113 44 56 
n2 58 37 
n2 2 45 
III 28 12 
no 59 18 
no 52 7 


e 


5 54 56 

5 52 44 

6 12 8 

6 12 38 

5 56 48 

5 53 54 

6 26 34 
6 53 46 
6 52 28 
6 56 4 
6 58 32 


1 





I 

G 


1 


37 46 
18 36 
3 6 
36 24 
5^ 6 
18 46 




I 

I 
Z 


34 J8 
26 48 

as 00 


At Surabaya 







APPENDIX. 

TABLES OF THE ROUTE OF THE ESPERANCE. 



105 



Date, 

1793- 



Oaober. 



3 
4 
5 
6 

7 
9 

TO 
1 I 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 

17 



Variation of the 
Needle Weft. . 



Their 



fr. 



fr. 

fr. 
Ir. 
fr. 
ir. 



» 9 34 



58 52 

56 38 

56 44. 

23 47 

4.8 9 



23>3 

22,2 



22,3 

22,1 

22,4. 

22,0 

22,8 
22,5 

=13.5 

23,0 
23,0 
23,6 

a3>7 
23,6 



Barometer 



Wind and State of the Weather, 



S.S.E.E.S.E. Mod. br. fair 
S.S.E.E.S.E Gufls of wind, fair 

CFrom S. to W.S.W. Mod. 

I br. fair 
S.E. Mod. br. fair 

iFrom E. to S.E. Mod. br, 

i very fair 

E.S.E. S.E. Mod.br. fair 
E.S.E. Mod. br. fair 
Ditto 
Ditto 
Ditto 

N.E. Mod. br. fair 
N.W. Mod. br. fair 
N.N.W. N. Mod. br. fair 
N.E. S.W. Fair 



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